Page images
PDF
EPUB
[blocks in formation]

Prefix initial letter to b for dable, gable, gible, (j,) cable, (kg) mable, rable, sible, table, tible. Prefix initial letter to s for dist, list, mist, pist, rist, list.

[blocks in formation]

30. In accordance with the general principle of abbreviation stated in par. 14, all words of the SUBORDINATE grammatical classes-articles, prepositions, pronouns, and connectives—are written WITHOUT FULL SIZED CONSONANTS. This, with the accentual mode of writing other words, renders each sentence emphatic to the eye, and distinguishes between subordinate and principal words which have the same consonants; such as during and daring, till (adverb) and till (verb,) very and vary, soon and sign, none and nun, &c.

31. The most common of the subordinate words are written altogether in tick size ; in other cases, those letters which have no preceding vowel are written in tick-size, and those which have a preceding vowel, are written larger, or in half size. The auxiliary verbs HAVE, SHALL,

and Will, are denoted by their initial letters in full size. The W for will may

be written either thick or thin. 32. The following Table contains words represented by single consonants. The first column consists chiefly of pronouns and prepositions, the symbols for which are written in tick size. The second column contains words represented by half sized letters. Some of these do not properly belong to this class of symbols, such as d for did, w for with, y for yes, &c., half sized consonants, according to the general rule implying a vowel after them. In these cases therefore it may be necessary to insert a vowel dot to distinguish the words of the regular class -at least in those few instances where the context would not render the distinction sufficiently manifest. The words in the third column are represented by full sized characters, which according to the fundamental principle imply a preceding vowel. All the words are regular in this respect, except have, shall, and will ; the symbols for which are perfectly distinctive, as these full sized letters never occur as the single element of a word, except in the one instance of sh in the word ash.

[blocks in formation]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

33. Almost every word of more than one syllable has a perfectly pictorial individuality of form, according to our peculiar principle of writing, and it is rarely, except in the case of monosyllables, that the same consonant outline can be representive of more than one word. In the case of single-letter words, however, it is sometimes otherwise. In the following Lists all the words that could be denoted by the different single letters are collected, so that the writer may see at once the extent of possible ambiguity in the omission of vowels, and the cases in which it may be expedient to insert the vowel symbols.

I. Half-Size. b-bay, bee, buy, bow, boy ; ch-chew; d-day, die, doe, dough ; f-fay, fee, fie, foe; g-gay, guy; h-hay, high, ho, hoe, hoy ; j-jaw, jay, jew, jo, joy ; k-cow, coy, quay ; l-lay, lea, lie, lo, low ; m-maw, mow; n-nay, nigh, knee ; p-pay, pea, pie ; r-ray, roe, row, rue, wry ; s-say, sea, see, sigh, sow; sh-shoe, show, shy; t-tea, tie, toe, tow, toy ; th-thigh ; v-vie, vow; wh-whey ; w-wav, woe, woo.

II. Full-Size. B-ebb ; CH-etch, itch ; D-add, aid, ode; F-oaf; G-egg; J-age, edge; K-ache, eke, oak ; L-ail, ale, eel, isle, oil, owl; M-aim ; N-auln, awn, inn ; P-ape, ope; R-air, ear, ere, ire, oar, ore ; S-ace, ass, ice ; SH-ash ; T-ate, eat, oat ; TH-oath ; V-eve; Z-ease,

ooze.

34. In the two following Tables are collected the subordinate words of more than one letter : I. Those written altogether in Tick Size : II. Those written in the relative proportions of Tick and Half Size. The lists include a few common adjectives, verbs, &c., besides the words of the regular classes. All the consonants in each word are written, unless contractions are specified.

I. Words written altogether in Tick size.

mr

mrs

about above alone also altogether it g always 1 w because b k before bf behind b b below b1 beneath bn besides bs between bt betwixt btw beyond by best better br both come cross kr dear down downward

d nw during enough first fst firstly fs 1 forth fth forthwith fth w forward fw from fr

fully-y
midst

therefore th f
great gr
mine

these th z
greater grr Miss

this
greatest grst Misses

till
hardly hd 1
mong

together tg
her
mongst

towards tw
his
Mr

until
into (thin)
Mrs

unto
indeed nd
much

upon
judge jd
next nk

upper
judgement j ment none

very
justly jl
nor

well
large lj

nothing n ring what largest ljt notwithstanding when last

nws ring

where
lastly 1s 1

whereas
like-ly
rather

whereat
likelihood Ik hood rather than

wherein
likewise 1 kw saint st

whereon
little
sir

wherefore
long
some

wherewith whr w longer 1 ring r

something 8 m ring wherewithal (add 1) longest l ring t sometimes 8 m t whether wb th madam

whether or no (add master mst sooner

neg.-see par. 37.) meantime

mnt
soonest
snt

while
meanwhile mn wh square

sk

whilst
Messrs msrs street str

whole h 1
middle
such

wholly (add dot) middling m 1 ring than

your mid that

yours

one

Wn

rr

rrn

mm

soon

[ocr errors]
« PreviousContinue »