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INTRODUCTION.

The New Principle of Stenography, which IMPLIES THE VOWELS, by the relative size of the consonants in words, constitutes the mere ALPHABET OF CONSONANTS, on this basis, a very brief, perfectly legible, and, at the same time, a Universal System of Shorthand. With but few special variations, the same characters may be employed to reduce to universally legible phonetic writing the myriad dialects of the earth. To the natives of any country, who, of course, are familiar with the words of their language, the use of vowel points is, by this principle of notation, rendered quite unnecessary, and the simple consonant writing possesses all the advantages of highly abbreviated Tachygraphy; while by the insertion of vowel marks, the writing of any language, as pronounced, may be rendered legible all over the world. The alphabet with its associated principle of notation presents the ready vehicle of a Universal Language.

The aim of the present work, however, is not to furnish a system of Shorthand for all nations, but to adapt for the fleet exigencies of the

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Words written altogether in tick size,
Words written without full sized characters,
Junction of Subordinate Symbols, (par. 35-37.)
Centre dot before Small Consonants,
Compound Words and Phrases,
Numeral Phrases,
Analogical Symbols,

Punctuation,
REPORTING, OR LOGOGRAM STYLE,

A distinctive Position for Logograms,
Single Letter Logograms,
TABLE OF ALPHABETIC LOGOGRAMS,
Dot Logograms,
Ring and Circle Logograms,
Double Dot Symbols,
Subject Symbol,
Comment Symbols,
Foreign Sounds,
NUMBERS,
Titles, Business Phrases, &c.
Examples of Transverse Abbreviations,
Principles of Logogram Construction,

Examples and Explanations,
VOCABULARY OF LOGOGRAMS,

Postscript to Vocabulary, Directions, &c.,
Recapitulatory Table of Prefixes,

Key to Plates,
PLATES.

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INTRODUCTION.

The New Principle of Stenography, which IMPLIES THE VOWELS, by the relative size of the consonants in words, constitutes the mere ALPHABET OF CONSONANTS, on this basis, a very brief, perfectly legible, and, at the same time, a Universal System of Shorthand. With but few special variations, the same characters may be employed to reduce to universally legible phonetic writing the myriad dialects of the earth. To the natives of any country, who, of course, are familiar with the words of their language, the use of vowel points is, by this principle of notation, rendered quite unnecessary, and the simple consonant writing possesses all the advantages of highly abbreviated Tachygraphy ; while by the insertion of vowel marks, the writing of any language, as pronounced, may be rendered legible all over the world. The alphabet with its associated principle of notation presents the ready vehicle of a Universal Language.

The aim of the present work, however, is not to furnish a system of Shorthand for all nations, but to adapt for the fleet exigencies of the

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Reporter the system of “ Popular Stenography,” on the rudiments of which the construction of an interpopular system of writing would really be both feasible and easy.

This Manual is not designed exclusively for students who have already mastered the Curt Style of the system. It has been thought better to adapt the Work for the use of those also who have not previously studied the system at all—either in the Lessons in the “Popular Educator,” or in the improved separate re-publication“ Bell's Popular Stenography.” The whole system is therefore here given with such improvements in the various Styles as experience has suggested. The abbreviations made use of throughout the system do not consist of arbitrary modes of writing particular words, but of definite principles of notation applicable to whole classes of words. These being collected here in a form convenient for reference, the Work will it is hoped, prove more useful both to former students and new learners than if it had been limited to the Improvements and Additions it embodies.

The following synopsis of the PRINCIPLES OF CONTRACTION employed will manifest the simplicity and compactness of the entire system, qualities for which the Full and Curt Styles have been universally acknowledged to stand pre-eminent.

FULL, OR SYLLABIC STYLE. I. Vowel marks rendered unnecessary, and the number of syllables in words manifested to the eye, by the fundamental principle of consonant notation.

II. Final syllables ending in vowels denoted by their consonants alone, without vowel marks.

III. Twelve Prefixes and Terminations represented by six symbols.

CURT, OR ACCENTUAL STYLE. I. The accented syllables in words and the primary or emphatic words in sentences manifested to the eye without the use of any separate symbol.

II. Prefixes and Terminations of numerous definite species represented by their first consonants written in distinctive positions.

REPORTING, OR LOGOGRAM STYLE. I. Logograms, or abbreviations of primary words, written in a position which distinguishes them from the contractions of subordinate words.

II. Titles, Business Phrases, Comments, &c. written in distinctive modes.

III. Arbitrary symbols—of such forms as cannot occur in Alphabetic writing-employed for definite classes of abbreviations.

The Improvements on the formerly published portions of the system consist in the addition, to the First Style, of consonant symbols in a central vowel position for final syllables ending in vowels; and in the extension of the same principle to the exact vowel positions, in the Curt Style; together with the addition of tick-sized crossing symbols for other classes of Prefixes and Terminations.

The first sketch of this system was published in 1849 in a chapter on Phonetic Notation in the Author's “ New Elucidation of the Principles of Speech." In 1852 the first separate and complete edition of the system was issued under the title of “Steno-phonography.” This was followed in 1852–3 by the “Lessons in Phonetic Shorthand” in Cassell's “Popular Educator," for which Periodical the system was selected for its philosophical simplicity and superiority over all competitors.' In 1854 the system was explained in a Paper read before

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