The Poetical Works of Charles Mackay: Now for the First Time Collected. Complete in One Volume

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F. Warne and Company, 1876 - 626 pages

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Page 268 - Old Tubal Cain was a man of might, In the days when earth was young; By the fierce red light of his furnace bright, The strokes of his hammer rung ; And he lifted high his brawny hand On the iron glowing clear, Till the sparks rushed out in scarlet showers, As he fashioned the sword and spear. And he sang — " Hurrah for my handiwork ! Hurrah for the spear and sword ! Hurrah for the hand that shall wield them well, For he shall be king and lord ! " To Tubal Cain came many a one.
Page 1 - But it is not the lie that passeth through the mind, but the lie that sinketh in and settleth in it, that doth the hurt such as we spake of before. But...
Page 1 - ... a natural though corrupt love of the lie itself. One of the later school of the Grecians examineth the matter, and is at a stand to think what should be in it that men should love lies : where neither they make for pleasure, as with poets; nor for advantage, as with the merchant; but for the lie's sake.
Page 237 - For him the axe be bared ; For him the gibbet shall be built; For him the stake prepared ; Him shall the scorn and wrath of men Pursue with deadly aim ; And malice, envy, spite, and lies, Shall desecrate his name. But truth shall conquer at the last, For round and round we run, And ever the right comes uppermost, And ever is justice done.
Page 588 - Thou'rt wrong, my friend," said old King Hal, "Thou'rt wrong as wrong can be; For could my heart be light as thine, I'd gladly change with thee. And tell me now what makes thee sing With voice so loud and free, While I am sad, though I am king, Beside the river Dee." The miller smiled and doffed his cap; "I earn my bread...
Page 366 - Under the greenwood tree Who loves to lie with me, And tune his merry note Unto the sweet bird's throat — Come hither, come hither, come hither! Here shall he see No enemy But winter and rough weather. Who doth ambition shun And loves to live i' the sun, Seeking the food he eats And pleased with what he gets — Come hither, come hither, come hither!
Page 211 - There's a fount about to stream, There's a light about to beam, There's a warmth about to glow, There's a flower about to blow ; There's a midnight blackness changing Into grey ! Men of thought and men of action, Clear the way!
Page 211 - With the right shall many more Enter smiling at the door : With the giant wrong shall fall Many others, great and small, That for ages long have held us for their prey. Men of thought and men of action, clear the way ! CHARLES MACKAY.
Page 209 - Is the day breaking? comes the wish'd-for hour? Tell us the signs, and stretch abroad thy hand If the bright morning dawns upon the land.
Page 3 - The appropriate business of poetry, (which, nevertheless, if genuine, is as permanent as pure science,) her appropriate employment, her privilege and her duty, is to treat of things not as they are, but as they appear; not as they exist in themselves, but as they seem to exist to the senses, and to the passions.

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