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CONGRESS APPROPRIATIONS FOR FISCAL YEARS ENDING JUNE 30,

1899, 1900 AND 1901.

Title.
Agriculture
Army
Diplomatic and

consular
1Dist. of Columbia.
Fortification
Indian
Legislative, etc...
Military Academy.
Navy
Pension
?Postoffice
River and harbor.
Sundry civil..

Estimates, ’01. |Law, 1900-1901. | Law, 1899-1900. Law, 1898–1899.

$4,306,257 001 $4,023,500 00 $8,726,022 001 $3,509,202 00 127, 712, 133 55 114, 220,095 55 80,430,204 06 23, 193,392 00

1,895,848 76 1,771,168 76 1,714,533 761 1,752, 208 76
7,657,773 31 7,577,369 31 6,834,535 77 6,426,880 07
11,728,938 00 7,383,628 00 4,909,902 001 9,377,494 00

6,800,526 52 8,197,989 24 7,504,775 81 7,673,854 90
25,019, 269 91 24, 175,652 53 23,410,840 79 21,625,846 65
702, 292 99
674,306 67
575,774 47

458,689 23 74,245,509 15 65,140,916 67 48,099,969 58 56,098, 783 68 145, 230, 230 00 145, 245, 230 00 145,233,830 00 141, 233,830 00 110,777,800 00 113, 658,238 75 105,634,138 75 99,222,300 75 319,993,741 31

4560,000 00 616,091,841 94 670,072, 708 28 765,319,915 45 848,385,930 86 1548,490,212 26 $606,143,028 78 $557,948,010 .93 $492,552,299 791 $419,062, 694 30

14

deficiency

8,995, 292 16

Totals Urgent

military & naval es tablishments,

etc. Urgent deficiency,

naval establishment, etc.... Urgent deficiency,

United States

courts, etc.... Deficiency, 1900,

and prior years..

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Grand total, regular and permanent annual ap

appropriations $767,355,248 78| 12$710,150,862 88 | 13$674,981,022 29| 18$893,231,615 55 Amount of estimated revenues for fiscal year 1901.

.$560,000,000 00 Amount of estimated postal revenues for fiscal year 1901.

107,773,253 92 Total estimated revenues for fiscal year 1901....

$667,773,253 92 10ne-half of the amounts for the District of Columbia payable by the United States, except amounts for the water department (estimated for 1901 at $135,341), which are payable from the revenues of the water department.

2Includes all expenses of the postal service payable from postal revenues and out of the Treasury.

3This amount is exclusive of $15,582,626 68 to meet contracts authorized by law for river and harbor improvements included in the sundry civil estimates for 1901.

In addition to this amount the sum of $12,200,605 75 is appropriated in the Sundry Civil act to carry out contracis authorized by law for river and harbor improvements for 1901, and $3,500,000 additional for river and harbor improvements for 1901, making in all $16,260, 605 75 for rivers and harbors for 1901.

bIn addition to this amount the sum of $8,918,197 is appropriated in the Sundry Civil act to carry out contracts authorized by law for river and harbor improvements for 1900.

This amount includes $15,582,626 68 to meet contracts authorized by law for river and harbor improvements for 1901.

7This amount includes $12,200,605 75 to carry out contracts authorizod by law for river and harbor improvements for 1901, and $3,500,000 additional for river and harbor improvements for 1901; in all, $15,700,605 75.

sThis amount includes $8,918,197 to carry out contracts authorized by law for river and harbor improvements for 1900.

This amount is approximated. The amount of deficiency estimates does not include $47,602,332 61 estimated for but reappropriated out of unexpended balances of former appropriations for military and naval establishments.

10 This amount includes $20,000,000 to carry out the obligations of the treaty between the United States and Spain, concluded December 10, 1898, and $3, 146, 143 97 for payment of claims under the Bowman and Tucker acts and French spoliation and other claims.

11 This is the amount submitted by the Secretary of the Treasury in the annual estimates for the fiscal year 1900, the exact amount appropriated not being ascertainable until two years after the close of the fiscal year.

12In addition to this amount, contracts are authorized to be entered into, subject to future appropriations by Congress, as follows: By the District of Columbia act, $259,500; by the Naval act, $52,334,374; by the Sundry Civil act, $4,717,500; by miscellaneous acts, $1,129,000; in all, $58,440,374.

13In addition to this amount, contracts are authorized to be entered into, subject to future appropriations by Congress, as follows: By the District of Columbia act, $563,000; by the Naval act, $44,454,500; by the River and Harbor act, $23,866,324 13; by the Sundry Civil act, $6,088,450; by miscellaneous acts, $2,075,000; in all, $77,047,274 13.

14 No river and harbor bill passed for 1899, but the sum of $14,031,613 56 is appropriated in the Sundry Civil act to carry out contracts authorized by law, and $235,836 additional for river and larbor improvements for 1899; in all, $14,267,449 56. The General Deficiency act also appropriates $360,000 additional for river and harbor improvements, making in all for river and harbor improvements in Sundry Civil act for 1899 and in General Deficiency act, $14,627,449 56.

15 This amount includes $14,031,613 56 to carry out contracts authorized by law for river and harbor improvements for 1899, and $235,836 additional for river and harbor improvements for 1899; in all, $14,267,449 56.

16This amount includes $329,661,795 77 on account of expenses of war with Spain, and $8,070,872 46 on account of payment of pensions fiscal year 1898.

17This is the amount submitted by the Secretary of the Treasury in the annual estimates for the fiscal year 1899, the exact amount appropriated not being ascertainable until two years after the close of the fiscal year.

18Includes $361,859,927 26 on account of expenses of war with Spain. In addition to this total amount contracts are authorized to be entered into, subject to future appropriations by Congress, as follows: By the District of Columbia act, $230,000; by the Naval act, $23,366,156; by the Sundry Civil act, $352,500; by the Urgent Deficiency act, $225,000; in all, $24,173,656.

TRADE-MARK LAWS. The following classes may obtain registration: (a) Any person, firm or corporation domiciled in the United States or located in any foreign country which, by treaty, convention or law, affords similar privileges to citizens of the United States, and who is entitled to the exclusive use of any trade-mark and uses the same in commerce with foreign nations or with Indian tribes. (b) Any citizen or resident of this country wishing the protection of his trade-mark in any foreign country the laws of which require registration in the United States as a condition precedent. An application for the registration of a trade-mark will consist of a statement or specification, a declaration or oath, and drawing, which must follow rules laid down. These should be preceded by a brief letter of advic requesting registration and signed by the applicant.

The statement should announce the full name, citizenship, domicile, residence, and place of business of the applicant (or, if the applicant be a corporation, under the laws of what State or nation incorporated), with a full and clear specification of the trademark, particularly discriminating between its essential and non-essential features. It should also state from what time the trade-mark has been used by the applicant, the class of merchandise, and the particular goods comprised in such class to which the trade-mark is appropriated, and the manner in which the trade-mark has been applied to the goods. The declaration should be in the form of an oath by the person, or by a member of the firm, or by an officer of the corporation, making the application, to the effect that the party has at the time of filing his application a right to the use of the trade-mark described in the statement; that no other person, firm, or corporation has a right to such use, either in the identical form or in such near resemblance thereto as might be calculated to decei:e; that such trade-mark is used in lawful commerce with foreign nations or Indian tribes, one or more of which should be particularly named; and that it is truly represented in the fac-simile presented for registry. The oath may be taken within the United States before a notary public, justice of the peace, or the judge or clerk of any court of record. In any foreign country it may be taken before the secretary of a legation or consular officer of the United States, or before any person duly qualified by the laws of the country to administer oaths, whose official character shall be certified by a representative of the United States having an official seal. A fee of $25 is required on filing application, except in cases named in the following: Owners of trade-marks for which protection has been sought by registering ther. in the Patent Office under the act of July 8, 1870 (declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Court of the United States), may register the same for the same goods, without fee, on compliance with the foregoing requirements. With each application of this character a specific reference to the date and number of the former certificate is required. Applicants whose cases were filed under the act of 1870, either prior to or since the decision of ihe Supreme Court declaring it unconstitutional, which are now pending before the office, are advised to prepare applications in conformity with the law and foregoing rules. On the receipt of such an application, referring to the date of the one formerly filed, all fees thereon will be duly applied. Those who have paid only $10 as a first fee are advised that the law does not provide for a division of the legal fee of $25, and that the remainder of the entire fee is required before the application can be entertained.

LEGISLATURE OF NEW-YORK.

The following is a summary of the most important laws enacted by the New-York Legislatura in 1900:

The rapid increase in the deleterious use of "preservatives" in milk induced the Legislature ta amend the Agricultural law by making it a misdemeanor to sell such

chemicals. The law as amended now reads: "No person Preservatives

shall sell, offer or expose for sale any butter or other dairy in Milk.

products containing a preservative, but this shall not be

construed to prohibit the use of salt in butter or cheese, or spirituous liquors in club or other fancy cheese or sugar in condensed milk.

No person or persons, firm, association or corporation shall induce or attempt to induce any person or persons to violate any of the provisions of the Agricultural law. Any person, firm, association or corporation selling, offering or advertising for sale any substance, preparation or matter for use in violation of the provisions of the Agricultural law shall be guilty of a violation of this act.”

Section 23 of Chapter 338 of the Laws of 1893 had the following paragraph added to it: “Whenever manufacturers of butter or cheese purchase milk upon the basis of

the amount of fat contained therein and use for ascertainTests for Ascertain- ing the amount of such fat what is known as the Babcock ing_the Amount of test, the bottles used in such test shall before use be exFats in Milk. amined by the director of the Geneva Experimental Station,

If such bottles are found to be properly constructed and graded so as to accurately show the amount of fat contained in milk, each of them shall be legibly and indelibly marked 'S. B.' No bottle shall be so marked except as herein provided nor shall be used in any such test by such manufacturers, unless so examined and marked. The acid used in making such test by such manufacturers shall be examined from time to time by competent chemists employed by the Commissioner of Agriculture and if found not to be of sufficient strength the use of such acid shall be prohibited. The Commissioner of Agriculture or persons employed by him for that purpose may at any time assist in mailing tests of milk received at a butter or cheese factory for the purpose of determining the efficiency of tests usually made at such factory. All persons using other than standard bottles or acid which is not of the required strength to accurately determine the amount of fats in milk shall be subject to the penalties prescribed by section 37 of this article, and shall be guilty of a misdemeanor."

Section 37 of Chapter 338 of the Laws of 1893 was amended to read: "A person who brings or causes to be brought to a butter or cheese factory owned or operated by a co-operative association milk diluted with water

or Penalties for

any unclean, impure, unhealthy, adulterated or unwholeDiluting Milk.

some milk, or milk from which any of the cream has been

taken, except pure skim milk to skim cheese factories, shall forfeit to the people of the State for the first offence the sum of $50 and for each subsequent offence the sum of $150; upon recovery of the penalt: so prescribed, onehalf thereof shall be paid into the State Treasury, one-fourth shall be paid into the county treasury, and the remaining one-fourth shall be paid to the treasurer of the co-operative association owning or operating such butter or cheese factory, to be divided among the members thereof in the same manner as the other receipts of such association."

Chapter 344 of the Laws of 1900 appropriates $50,000 to promote sugar beet culture.

By Chapter 346 of the Laws of 1900 a State Fair Commission of eleven members was created, to consist of the Lieutenant-Governor and Commissioner of Agriculture

ex officio, a member of the New-York State Grange, State Fair Com

member of the New-York State Association of County mission.

Agricultural Societies, one a member of the Union Associa

tion of Agricultural Societies, and the others to be selected at will by the Governor. It is made the duty of the State Fair Commission to hold a State Fair and authority is given it to make, alter, suspend or repeal needed rules relating to such fair, including the times and duration thereof, the terms and conditions of entries and admissions, exhibits, sale of privileges, and payment of premiums, At the close of each fair the Commission is to pay to the State Treasurer any balance remaining in its hands received in connection with the State Fair.

Chapter 737 of the Laws of 1900 amends Section 57 of the Laws of 1899 so that the Attorney-General, independently of the Governor, can assign counsel to prosecute

crimes against the elective franchise in New-York City. Extending Authority The section as amended reads as follows: "The Attorneyof Attorney-General. General shall assign one or more of his deputies to act as

counsel for the State Superintendent of Elections and to take charge of prosecutions arising in any county included within the metropolitan elections district as described in Chapter 676 of the Laws of 1898 under said chapter and Title 5 of the Penal Code. Such deputy shall represent the people of this state in all such prosecutions before all magistrates and in all courts and before any Grand Jury having cognizance thereof; and shall act as special counsel and adviser to said State Superintendent of Elections in the performance of his duties. The deputies SO assigned shall be appointed pursuant to Section 51 of this act. They may be specially

a

appointed thereunder for the purpose of such assignment and for the performance of the duties herein described."

Chapter 739 of the Laws of 1900 amends Section 68 of Chapter 565 of the Laws of 1890 so that it reads: "All steam railroads hereafter constructed across the tracks of

any other railroad and any street surface railroad hereafter Railroad Grade constructed across a steam railroad shall be above, below, Crossings.

or at grade of such existing railroad as the Board of Rail

road Commissioners shall determine, and such Board shall in such determination fix the proportion of expense of such crossing to be paid by each railroad.'

Under Chapter 517 of the Laws of 1900 Section 65 of Chapter 565 of the Laws of 1890 has the following paragraph added to it in relation to railway grade crossings:

"No claim for damages to property on account of the Claims for Grade change or abolishment of any crossing under the provisions Crossing Damages. of this act shall be allowed unless notice of such claim is

filed with the Board of Railroad Commisioners within six months after completion of the work necessary for such change or abolishment."

Section 6 of the General Corporation Law is amended by Chapter 704 of the Laws of 1900 so as to read: "No certificate of incorporation of a proposed corporation having

the same name as an existing domestic corporation, or a Corporate Names. name so nearly resembling it as to be calculated to deceive,

shall be filed or recorded in any office for the purpose of effecting its incorporation. A corporation formed by the reincorporation, reorganization or consolidation of other corporations or upon the sale of the property or franchises of a corporation, may have the same name as the corporation or one of the corporations to whose franchises it has succeeded. No corporation shall be hereafter organized under the laws of this State with the word trust, bank, banking, insurance, assurance, indemnity, guarantee, guaranty, savings, investment, loan or benefit as part of its name, except a corporation formed under the banking law or the insurance law."

Section 32 of the General Corporation law is amended so as to have included in it the following paragraph, under Chapter 177 of the Laws of 1900: “If all the stock of

a corporation other than a corporation formed under or Extension of Cor- subject to the banking law, or an insurance corporation, porate Existence. or a turnpike, plank road or bridge corporation shall be

lawfully owned by another stock corporation entitled by law to take a surrender and merger thereof, the corporate existence of such corporation whose stock is so owned may be extended at any time for the term of the corporate existence of the possessor corporation, by filing in the office or offices in which the original certificate or certificates of incorporation of the first mentioned corporation were filed a certificate of such extension executed by its president and secretary and by such corporation owning all the shares of its capital stock."

Chapter 80 of the Laws of 1900 amends the Liquor Tax law of 1896, making the following provision: "No corporation or association incorporated or organized under

the laws of another State or country; provided, however, Liquor Licenses for that if such corporation or association be acting as a comRailway Companies, mon carrier or be operating dining, buffet, parlor or sleep

ing cars in this State, it may be granted a liquor tax certificate under subdivision 4 of Section 11 of this act."

Chapter 498 of the Laws of 1900 appropriates $2,400 to extend the Bertillon method for the identification of criminals by authorizing the Superintendent of Prisons “to file, index and classify Bertillon descriptive cards received from other sources.".

The Legislature of 1900 repealed a section of the Penal Code which virtually permitted prize fighting in the State. An amendment was made to Section 458 of the

Penal Code by Chapter 270 of the Laws of 1900, so that it Horton Sparring will read: "Prize fighting and sparring exhibitions, aiding Act Repealed.

therein, et cetera. A person who, within this State, engages

in, instigates, aids, encourages or does any act to further a contention, or fight, without weapons, between two or more persons, or a fight commonly called a ring or prize fight, either within or without the State, or who engages in a public or private sparring exhibition, with or without gloves, within the State, at which an admission fee is charged or received, either directly or indirectly, or who sends or publishes a challenge or acceptance of a challenge for such a contention, exhibition or fight, or carries or delivers such a challenge or acceptance, or trains or assists any person in training or preparing for such a contention, exhibition or fight, is guilty of misdemeanor."

Chapter 588 of the Laws of 1900 amends Section 642 of the Penal Code, to punish especially those persons who make public the papers, for instance, found on the body

of one who has

committed suicide. The section, Punishment for amended, reads as follows: "Section 642 of the Penal Code, Opening and

as amended by Chapter 287 of the Laws of 1895, is hereby Publishing Private amended to read as follows: Section 642. A person who, Papers.

willfully, and without authority, either 1. Opens or reads,

or causes to be opened or read, a sealed letter, telegram, or private paper; or, 2. Publishes the whole or any portion of such a letter, or telegram, or private paper, knowing it to have been opened or read without authority; or, 3. Takes a letter, telegram or private paper, belonging to another, or a copy thereof, and publishes the whole or any portion thereof; or, 4. Publishes the whole or any portion of such letter, telegram or private paper, knowing it to have been taken or copied without authority; or, 6. Publishes or causes to be published, or connives at the pub

as

lication of any letter, telegram, or private paper or of any portion of any letter, telegram, or private paper found on, or among the effects of, any person who has been dangerously wounded, or who has' committed suicide, or who has 'died suddenly, or who has been found dead, unless such letter, telegram, or private paper shall have been produced pursuant to law before a coroner at an inquest and the publication of such letter, telegram, or private paper, or of such portion of such letter, telegram, or private paper shall have been declared by that coroner in writing to be necessary to aid in the discovery of a crime, or of the identity of the wounded or deceased person, is guilty of a misdemeanor.”

Chapter 658 of the Laws of 1900 authorizes the State Controller to appoint five persons in the county of New-York, two persons in Kings County and one person in Erie County to appraise inheritance taxes.

Chapter 381, Laws of 1900, harmonizes the general ballot act with the town meeting act, by providing that the ballots of the town meetings may be deposited at the

polls on the general Election Day. It says: "In towns in Town Meetings on which town meetings are held on election day, additional General

ballot boxes shall be provided, one to be marked 'box for Election Day. town ballots,' in which shall be deposited ballots cast for

candidates for town offices, and one to be marked 'box for town propositions,' in which shall be deposited ballots cast on town propositions and questions. Ballots for the submission of town propositions and questions to be submitted at town meetings held on election day shall be printed in the manner provided by this section, but shall be indorsed 'town proposition submitted.' The number of official ballots of each kind to be provided for each polling place for a town meeting, held at any time or a village or city election held at a different time from a general election, shall be one and one-half times as near as may be the number of persons who will be entitled to vote thereat, as nearly as can be estimated by the officer charged with the duty of providing such ballots. If the town meeting is held in general election day ballots and sample ballots for town officers and propositions shall be provided by the town clerk in like manner and in the same form as at a town meeting held at any other time and such town clerk shall also furnish inspectors' and ballot clerks' return sheets for making returns of the election of town officers and on town propositions or questions." Under Chapter 711 of the Laws of 1900 each inspector of election in the cities of

New-York and Buffalo is to receive $7 50 a day, instead of Increase Pay for $5, on registration days and election day; and $5 a day Election Officers. for the count and return of votes. The poll clerks have

their salaries increased to the same compensation as that of the inspectors. The ballot clerks have their compensation increased from $5 to $8 a day.

Chapter 648, Laws of 1900, amends Section 8 of Chapter 379 of the Laws of 1897 so that it reads: "A town or a ward of a city containing less than four hundred

electors may, at least thirty days before the election or Division of Election appointment of inspectors of election of such town Districts.

ward, be divided into election districts by the board

other body charged with such duty en, in the judgment of such board or body, the convenience of the electors shall be promoted thereby.”

Chapter 202 of the Laws of 1900 amends the Primary Reform act by declaring: "In case nominations for city or ward offices are made in primary election districts

under a rule adopted as prescribed in this section, cerPrimary Election tificates showing the result of the votes for the several Law.

candidates for nomination in the several districts shall be

made by the boards of inspectors thereof and filed in the office of the custodian of primary records who shall determine from such certificates the persons nominated for such offices." Chapter 533 of the Laws of 1900 provides that the employers of waitresses in a

hotel or restaurant "shall provide and maintain suitable Seats for Women seats for the use of such female employes, and permit the in Restaurants. use thereof by such employes to such an extent as may be

reasonable for the preservation of their health." Chapter 675 of the Laws of 1900 provides that “whenever a municipal Civil Service Commissioner has been removed by the unanimous vote of the three State Commis

sioners, with the written approval of the Governor, or Civil Service

whenever any municipal Commissioner shall resign or be Commissioners. removed by the Mayor pending an investigation by the

State Commission of the administration of the civil service of the city in which such person is a municipal commissioner, or whenever any municipal commissioner shall resign or be removed by the Mayor pending a hearing by the State Commission of charges preferred against such municipal commissioner, the State Commission and not the Mayor of such city shall have power to appoint persons to fill such vacancies, and such persons so appointed by the State Commission shall hold office as municipal Civil Service Commissinners of such city until the expiration of the term of the Mayor then in office and until their successors are appointed and qualify." Chapter 70 of the Laws of 1900 says: "Any person who solicits from a candidate

for an elective office money or other property as a conSoliciting Money sideration for a newspaper or other publication supporting from a Candidate any candidate for an elective office, is guilty of a misfor Office,

demeanor.'

or or

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