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linons ed for the Lady's Magazine,

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Londen Hiblish2 as the dat directe April 195807 by 6.Robinson Paternoster Row

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Hondosn del,

London, Hublished as the Act directs. June 14 2807. bv G. Robinson. Putemost P**

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THE

LADY'S MAGAZINE.

FOR AUGUST, 1807.

BOTANY FOR LADIES

By Dr. Thornton.

TENTH LBSSON,

MY fair reader has been hitherto be first trod, before we arrive at the fatigued by the explanation of bo- pleasant, tanical terms.

The fair reader will by this time Every science has its peculiar feel anxious to know the uses of the Language.

parts of flowers. Music has also its gamut, treble, The calyr is intended for the bass, flats, sharps, naturals, common protection of the flower at its first and triple time, semibrede, minim, opening. crochet, quader, semiquaver, demi Hence it is caducous, from the semiquuper, major and minor keys, Latin word cadere, to fall, dropping &c. &c. the meaning of which are sometimes immediately upon the to be understood, before the player expansion of the corolla, as with can have the satisfaction to delight the poppy. a circle by the varied and exquisite Usually it rolls back its leaves, or charms of music.

segments, as in the Meudia, vide So it is with botany.

plate 15.1. b. and often again closes The ancients invented a fable to them upon the fruit for its protecillustrate this necessary union. tion, as is seen in the same flower,

They represented Vulcan as mar vide pl. 15. l. c; and then not unsied to Venus, the Goddess of Beauty frequ-ntly increases to a considerato the God of Deformity.

ble size, as in the Egg-plant, vide The rugged path of science must pl. 15. i. & ande.

HAPPINESS.

Pale ere with many a crimson streak, Soft fading, tip'd the lime-invested hill;

And through blue steams emerging from the A FRAGMENT.

lake Rolls curling on, and hovers o'er the rill;

The smoke ihar slow evolves its pillar'd form By Sr.

From yonder straw-roof'd cottage, sweetly

throw'd MARY resides in a pleasant rural O'er my hush'd bosom a superior charm.' vale, upon the verge of a winding

As I walked with Mary, my ideas river. I had once the felicity to visit the virtuous maid. Her circumstan

were awakened; and I recollected ces are truly respectable. Her lowly like the present. The heart-rending

past pleasures, methought not un. yet happy cot is overspread with a canopy of jessamine ; – çirclet of spirits, and I endeavoured to forget

thought threw a damp upon my honey-suckles decks the door; a goldánch and a canary are the them, and with a sigh I began a

conversation. Mary was not inathappy, cheerful occupiers of this sil

tentive to my situation; she bade van arch.

me yet hope the time would come In shadier bower,

when ny sincerity would be rewardMore sacred and sequester'd, though but ed. We walked gently on. Pan or Sylvanus never slept, por nymph Nor Faunus haunted.'

Enamour'd walk, where odorous scents

disclose She reigns the beauty of the villa; The hidden jassamine, eglantine, and rose; by all beloved, by all respected; too 'Here whisperd love, and breath'd che sapo kind to injure, too good to distress, And stole a kiss unseen by vulgar eye.' ready to alleviate, and willing to oblige. Her form boasts the image

As we gat under the shade of a of loveliness, and all the elegance of Willow, I stole from her fingerike cleanliness; her temper. mild and golden pledge. As I viewed its glitpleasing. Mary is adorned with tering form, my aching bosom swell

every grace that renders lovely wo-ed and recoiled with a sigh: I could man truly amiable. :

have wished I might be allowed to

return, another to Mary-return a Graceful she moves, with more than mertal promise of connubial bliss; but I taein,

dared not entertain the hope. Haplo form an angel'

- py and blest (exclaimed I) is the When Milton 'speaks of Paradise, fortunate youth that claims you as and describes Eve, and the impres- his own! sión Adam felt when he first beheld

"Oh! were it mine to win this maiden's her, that impression was not more

heart, forcible than were my feelings at Mary, whose enlightend soul is pure the first interview I had with Mary. And spotless, as her form is beautiful; The friendship I conceived for her

Then, heavenly Love, thee would I celebrate,

In numbers noc unworthy of tbe theme: might soon have been converted into From stotny passions, rage, ambition, frce, lore, had I not known a gentle The whirlwind and the tempest of the soul; gwain pleaded his addresses. I saw

Free from the fury passions, and serene

As this blest season's mildness, we would rove himmi congratulated him, and with Through Nature's wilds romantic, hills, 'valo, a frankness worthy of him, he put

woods, his Mary under my care, and we The grace peculiar of the rural scenes,

And marking to each other as we stray'd set out for a walk.

Thus joining voicus, raptur'd sing of whee.'

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