The works of Francis Bacon, Volume 5

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

To the lord keeper ibid 20 To the lord keeper
218
To the lord keeper ibid 22 A letter to the lord treasurer Burghley recom mending his first suit touching the Solicitors place
219
To the lord keeper
221
To the lord keeper
222
To the lord keeper ibid 26 To the lord keeper
223
To the lord keeper
224
To the lord keeper
225
To the lord keeper ibid M To the lord keeper
226
To the lord keeper
227
To my lord of Essex ibid 33 To my lord of Essex
233
To Sir John Stanhope
235
To my lord of Essex
236
To my lord of Essex
237
To the queen
238
To Sir Robert Cecil
239
To Sir Robert Cecil
240
To Foulk Grevil MI
241
To my lord of Essex
242
To Sir Robert Cecil
243
A letter of advice to the earl of Essex to take upon him the care of Irish causes when Mr secretary Cecil was in France
244
A letter of advice to the earl of Essex upon the first treaty with Tyrone before the earl was nominated for the charge of Ireland
246
A letter of advice to my lord of Essex immedi ately before his going into Ireland
248
To my lord of Essex
252
A letter framed as from the earl in answer
261
To my lord of Canterbury
270
To the earl of Northumberland recommending
271
A letter to the lord of Kinlosse upon his
277
To the earl of Southampton upon the kings
281
To Sir Thomas Bodeley upon sending his book
287
To the lord chancellor touching the History
293
Another letter to the earl of Salisbury touch
299
To Mr Matthew imprisoned for religion 804
304
To Sir Thomas Bodeley after he had imparted
310
To Mr Matthew upon sending to him a part
318
To the Prince of Wales dedicating his Essays
324
Of helps of the intellectual powers
332
To the king touching Peachams cause ibid
338
To the king touching my lord chancellors
350
justice Coke
353
To the king
361
To the king concerning the new company
363
To Sir George Villiers about Ropers place
366
To the king ibid 125 To the king advising him to break off with the new company
369
To the king touching the chancellors sick ness
371
To the king ibid 128 A letter to the king of my lord chancellors amendment and thedifference begun between the chancery and kings bench
374
To Sir George Villiers
376
To Sir George Villiers about swearing him into the privy council
377
To the king of the chancery and kings bench
378
To Sir George Villiers
387
To his majesty about the earl of Somerset ibid 135 To his majesty about the chancellor s place
389
To Sir George Villiers about the earl of So merset
390
To Sir George Villiers about the earl of So merset
393
A letter to the king with his majestys obser vations upon it
395
139 To Sir George Villiers about the earl of So merset
398
To Sir George Villiers qj Somersets arraign ment
400
To the king about Somersets examination
402
An expostulation to the lord chiej justice Coke
403
To Sir George Villiers
411
To the kingabout the Commendams
412
A memorial for his majesty 1616
414
To Sir George Villiers
420
Touching the Commendams
421
To Sir George Villiers
435
To Sir George Villiers
436
To Sir George Villiers
438
To the king
441
To Sir George Villiers on sending his bill for viscount
442
To Sir George Villiers on sending his patent
443
To the king ofSir George Villierss patent
445
To Sir George Villiers on sending his patent sealed
446
To Sir George Villiers acknowledging the kings favour
447
To the king ibid 161 To the lord ViscountVilliers
448
Reasons why the new company is not to be trusted and continued with the trade
448
cloths
449
To the lord ViscountVilliers
451
To the lord viscount Villiers
452
To the earl of Buckingham
466
To the king about the Spanish match
467
To the earl of Buckingham 469
469
An account of council business and other matters
470
referred to in the foregoing letter
474
To the lord keeper ibid
475
To the earl of Buckingham
476
To thenar I of Buckingham ibid 182 To the king
478
To the earl of Buckingham
481
To the king
482
To the earl of Buckingham
483
A memorial for his majesty
484
187 To the earl ofBuckingham
486
To the earl of Buckingham
487
To the earl of Buckingham
488
To the lord keeper
489
To the earl of Buckingham ibid 192 To the earl of Buckingham
491
To the king
493
To the marquis of Buckingham
495
To Mr Matthew about reading and giving judgment upon his writings
496
To the Marquisof Buckingham ibid 198 To the lord chancellor
499
To the king ibid 200 To the lord chancellor
500
To the marguis of Buckingham
501
To the Marquisof Buckingham
502
To the Marquisof Buckingham
503
To the marquis of Buckingham
505
To the Marquisof Buckingham
507
To the Marquisof Buckingham
508
To the marquis of Buckingham ibid
511
To the Marquisof Buckingham
514
To the lord chancellor
515
To the marquis of Buckingham 5
516
To the Marquisof Buckingham ibid 219 To the lord chancellor
517
To the lord chancellor
518
To the Marquisof Buckingham ibid 222 To the lord chancellor
520
To the Marquisof Buckingham ibid 224 To the lord chancellor
521
To the marquis of Buckingham v
522
To the marquis of Buckingham
523
To the Marquisof Buckingham
524
To the marquis of Buckingham ibid
525
To the Marquisof Buckingham ibid 231 To the lord chancellor
526
To the Marquisof Buckingham
527
To the Marquisof Buckingham
529
To the marquis of Buckingham ibid 237 To the marquis of Buckingham
530
To the king ibid
531
To the marquis of Buckingham
532
To the lord chancellor
534
This letter was written with the kings own hand to my lord chancellor Verulam upon his lordships sending to his majesty his Novum Organum
535
243 To the marquis of Buckingham ibid 244 Draught of a proclamation for a parliament referred to in the preceding letter
536
To the lord chancellor
541
Lord of St Albans to Mr Matthew
542
To Mr Matthew believing his danger less than he found it
543
To Mr Matthew owning his impatient atten tion to do him service
544
To the marquis of Buckingham ibid 252 To the marquis of Buckingham
546
To the lord chancellor
548
To the lord chancellor ibid 255 To the Marquisof Buckingham ibid 256 To the king
549
To the king
550
To the kings most excellent majesty MI
551
To the prince of Wales
552
To the king
553
To the Marquisof Buckingham
554
To the marquis of Buckingham
556
To the Marquisof Buckingham
557
To the king
558
To the lord St Alban
559
To the lord St Alban
560
To the lord St Alban ibid 271 To the lord St Alban
561
To the Marquisof Buckingham ibid 273 To the kings most excellent majesty
562
To the lord marquis of Buckingham high admiral of England
563
To father lledtmpt Baranzan
564
To the king
566
277 To Mr Matthew employing him to do a good office with a great man
571
To the lord Digby on his going to Spain
572
An expostulation to the marquis of Buck ingham
573
To the lord St Alban
575

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 355 - Fulke Greville, servant to queen Elizabeth, counsellor to king " James, and friend to Sir Philip Sidney.
Page 150 - ... envy, made it generally rather talked than believed that all was but the king's device. But howsoever it were, hereupon Perkin, that had offended against grace now the third time, was at the last proceeded with, and by commissioners of oyer and determiner, arraigned at Westminster, upon divers treasons committed...
Page 204 - Anaxagoras did, who reduced himself with contemplation unto voluntary poverty.: but this I will do; I will sell the inheritance that I have, and purchase some lease of quick revenue, or some office of gain that shall be executed by deputy, and so give over all care of service, and become some sorry book-maker, or a true pioneer in that mine of truth, which (he said) lay so deep.
Page 189 - He was born at Pembroke castle, and lieth buried at Westminster, in one of the stateliest and daintiest monuments of Europe, both for the chapel and for the sepulchre. So that he dwelleth more richly dead, in the monument of his tomb, than he did alive in Richmond, or any of his palaces.
Page 202 - MY LORD, — With as much confidence as mine own honest and faithful devotion unto your service and your honourable correspondence unto me and my poor estate can breed in a man, do I commend myself unto your Lordship. I wax now somewhat ancient: one and thirty years is a great deal of sand in the hour glass.
Page 90 - But in this she found him of himself so nimble and shifting, as she trusted much to his own wit and readiness ; and therefore laboured the less in it. Lastly, she raised his thoughts with some present rewards, and further promises ; setting before him chiefly the glory and fortune of a crown, if things went well, and a sure refuge to her court, if the worst should fall. After such time as she thought he was perfect in his lesson, she began to cast with herself from what coast this blazing star should...
Page 539 - I have brought unto you gemitum columbcz from others ; now I bring it from myself. I fly unto Your Majesty with the wings of a dove, which once within these seven days I thought would have carried me a higher flight. "When I enter into myself I find not the materials of such a tempest as is comen upon me. I have been, as Your Majesty knoweth best, never author of any immoderate counsel, but always desired to have things carried suavibus modis.
Page 63 - For she was not only publicly contracted, but stated, as a bride, and solemnly bedded ; and after she was laid, there came in Maximilian's ambassador with letters of procuration, and in the presence of sundry noble personages, men and women, put his leg, stript naked to the knee, between the espousal sheets ; to the end, that that ceremony might be thought to amount to a consummation and actual knowledge.
Page 58 - The ordinance was, that all houses of husbandry, that were used with twenty acres of ground and upwards, should be maintained and kept up for ever, together with a competent proportion of land to be used and occupied with them...
Page 94 - Queen, in that he did not reign in her right. Wherefore they said that God had now brought to light a masculine branch of the house of York, that would not be at his courtesy, howsoever he did depress his poor lady. And yet...

Bibliographic information