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of a wealthy landed proprietor in the neighbour. Mrs. Welford, deceived and blinded by her mahood of Fairdale, between whom and the parents ternal love, saw only the most graceful refinement of Alice there had always existed the warmest in her daughter ; while Mr. Welford, good man, friendship-a bond which seemed to unite even although he was at first somewhat puzzled, and more closely the hearts of their children. In child. was heard once or twice to utier an impatient hood they were inseparable, and until Frederick “pish !” at length concluded these new-fangled left for college, scarcely a day passed that the airs were all right, so seuiled himself contentedly three friends did not meet. Frederick was a down to his day-book and ledger. young man of promising talents, enthusiastic in Although many of her most intimate friends now his attachments, generous and noble in his feel. shunned the society of Alice, there were some who ings. He would not, it is true, have been consi- not only fancied they admired, but who also strove dered the beau ideal of manly beauty, yet there to imitate her every word and motion. Among was a charm in his frank ingenuous countenance, these Matilda Grant shone conspicuously; and which drew all hearts in his favour.

nature having innocently placed a languishing blue Although some years older than Alice, Frederick eye in her little head of light flaxen ringlets, and deemed it no reason why he should not continue given a gentle lisp to her tongue, the mantle of to love the beautiful girl ; as to falling in love, he affectation fell not ungracefully around her white never did :-he had adored ber with his whole dimpled shoulders. heart and soul from the time she first lisped his Could these young ladies but have seen themname. Nor was he by any means the only one selves as others saw them, how little would their fascinated and made captive by her charms. There self-love have been flattered ! for nowhere does was not a youth in the village but felt suicidal if affectation appear more odious than when she she but smiled upon another; and many were the comes with mincing step and languishing simper lines, now lost to fame, penned by some "mute amid the homely scenes of country life. inglorious Milton," which were inspired by her “God made the country, and man made the beauty.

town," are words which fell from the pen of the At leach_vacation, how gladly did Frederick inspired Cowper. It is in the gay thoroughfare hasten to Fairdale, sure of always meeting a joy- of ihe city, therefore, in the glitter of the ball. ful welcome from Alice! He witnessed with room, in the brilliant saloon, or amid the artificial delight the gradual development of her mind and allurements of fashionable life, that affectation may person in his eye she was perfection. No one be tolerated, although she is everywhere to be touched the piano with such 'skill; there was no despised. But let her shun the country-the very voice so sweet. No pencil but that of Alice could school of nature, where grace may be learned even have given that living glow to the landscape ; and from the tall grass as it meets the kiss of the her writing--ah! surely some elfin sprite must have summer wind, and where the little blue violet, and guided her little hand!

the spotless lily of the valley, teach lessons of Upon leaving college, Frederick commenced modesty and purity.

Music!-can the opera the study of medicine in Philadelphia. There, send forth sweeter notes than morn and eve day after day, night after night, did the young meet your ear from yonder grove?

Hark to student toil on in unceasing study, to make for the robin, and the merry bob-o'-link, or bimself a reputation and a name worthy his beloved the lark trilling her hymn of praise far up in Alice; for not until then, he resolved, would he the azure vault of heaven! The silvery rill, 100, offer either heart or hand to her acceptance. as it leaps and dances over its pebbly bed, will

But in the meanwhile, o'er the heaven of Alice teach you cheerfulness, and bright-eyed health and Welford's beauty a cloud was rising—a mere speck exercise transfer to your cheek the lovely tints of at first, yet ever increasing, until it overshadowed the rose. her whole lovely person! It was at first difficult to tell why she was less pleasing—for less pleasing Nearly a year of arduous study was passed by she certainly was. Her companions looked from Frederick Waldo ere he again visited 'Fairdale; one to the other, and silently wondered ; for so but now, with love, hope, and joy glowing at bis well did they all love her, that each one strove to heart, he once more pressed the green sward of his conceal her thoughts within her own bosom. native village. About this time Alice was invited to pass a few As soon as the affectionate greetings of kindred months in the city, and upon her return affectation were interchanged, he flew to the residence of Mr. stood forth too palpable to be longer mistaken! Welford, where he was received with the most

She was now suddenly distressed by fogs and cordial kindness. The natural feelings of Alice moonlight. She took to siglis and sentiment, and triumphed for a while over all affectation, and with in that vein her eyes were set, deep-rolling, tearful. a blush as of old, and a sparkling eye, she extended Her voice was now so fine,“ no sound could live her hand to meet the warm pressure of her early, 'twixt it and silence," and if she smiled (for now friend. For that evening Alice was herselfor if away with laughter), it was with manner con- perchance some few of her newly acquired graces strained and sickly. A beautiful mouth 100 had shone forth, they were eclipsed in the eyes of her Alice, and beautifully while were the little teeth lover by her more artless manner, and he left her within; yet somehow or other “ the pink portico presence intoxicated with love and happiness. with an ivory door" was arded by a strange But when the next morning Frederick saw Alice, fanciful porter! Her manners and conversation she was languidly reclining upon a sofa, apparently partook also of the same unnatural change. 100 much absorbed in reading to notice bis ap

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proach. With the prettiest little start in the world, I laying “ the flattering unction to his soul,” he was iherefore, she raised her head as his hand fell soon by the side of Alice. lightly upon her raven tresses, and exclaiming with “It is evening, Alice, the hour for music. You great pathos

will now sing to me." “Oh, tell me, have you read it ?" buried her face “Oh yes, with pleasure," she replied ; and then in her handkerchief.

seating herself wiih the most studied gracefulness “What is it, my dear Alice, that distresses you ? at the piano, arranging her profusion of long ring, Read what? What sudden calamity has befallen lets, with many other pretty little airs, she turned

in a languishing manner to Frederick, and inquired "Oh! no calamity to myself—but think of the in a soft voice what song he would prefer. A fasufferings of the poor wretched Sophie! Ah, is it vourile air from La Sonnambula' was named, not enough to rend the heart! But you must have with which Alice had olien charmed his ear. read · Sophie ?'”

Running her fingers lightly over the keys, the "I confess I have not,” replied Frederick, really fine voice of Alice coinmenced. “Still so smiling. “ But come, I cannot allow fictitious gently o'er me stealing.” Poor Frederick looked woes to prevent us from enjoying this fine morning. and listened with strangely commingled feelings of Bessie and I have planned a little excursion on pleasure and disgust. It was surely Alice—it was horseback (ever your delight, I remember), and her bird-like voice which fell on his ear! yet so I have called to ask you to accompany us." distorted, perverted by theatrical tone and manner,

Really, you are very kind, Mr. 'Waldo,” re- that he could hardly trust his senses. plied Alice; “but nothing could tempt me to Oh sweet! bewitching ! heavenly !". cried leave this charming book.”

Matilda Grant, clasping her hands, and rolling her “Indeed !" answered Frederick, evidently pretty eyes in ecstasy, piqued by her refusal ; “I flattered myself the Frederick merely bowed his thanks, and then society of a long absent friend might be of more named a simple Scotch air; but here, alas ! the value to you. But come, Alice," resuming all his most beautiful song of Burns was wonted frankness of manner,“ do lay aside your founded” with affected simplicity; and after many book. Recollect, for nearly a year Í have been vain attempts to elicit some chord which might pent within the walls of a city, and now feel as vibrate to his heart as in other days, Frederick if released from a galling bondage. I wish to turned sorrowfully away, and soon after took leave, enjoy every moment of nature and of you, my dear more unhappy than he had ever felt before, and friend."

perhaps less in love ! “Oh! pray take your ride-do, I beseech of Frederick remained a week in Fairdale. He you,” she replied, laying her hand on his arm, saw Miss Welford but seldom, yet each time they and pushing him gently from her. “Do go; did meet served only to disenchant him the more; but pray leave me to my delightfully absorbing and when he returned to Philadelphia, to pursue Sophie !"

those studies which for her sake had been so sweet, « Alice !"

life to the young student seemed disrobed of half “I believe I am very nervous this morning,” she its charms. added, as she felt that look of wounded affection fixed upon her; then rising, and slightly blushing, Room now for the elegant Julius Adolphus she walked to the window.

Bubble! Step aside, oh all ye village swains, ye “Since, then, you refuse me the happiness of home-spun youths ! Doff now your caps in your society, you will at least favour me with humble submission, and come not " betwixi the music-one song, Alice,” said Frederick.

wind and his nobility." “How can you ask me to sing in the inorning? Matilda Grant had a brother; this brother had It really is so outré, so désagréable, as the French a friend, and that friend was Julius Adolphus say; but since you wish it, I will play a favourite Bubble. He came from the far“ sunny south," to air of Matilda Grant's: Have you seen sweet inhale the cool breezes of a northern clime-to rusMatilda ? the loveliest creature! Yet I must say, ticate in the native village of his friend. Ah! to attempt eliciting harmony at such an unseason- favoured Fairdale, to receive beneath your rural able hour, does not coincide with my taste." shades this specimen exquisite the inimitable

“Then pray, Miss Welford, do not disturb Bubble! In the words of Carlyle, he may be best yourself on my account," replied Frederick, and described. coldly bowing, he left the room.

“ Elegant vacuum) serenely looking down upon As might be expected, there was no riding that all plenums and entities ! The doom of fate wasday. Frederick felt deeply hurt by the conduct “ Be thou a dandy! Have thy eye-glasses, operaof Alice; it was so strange, so unlike herself. glasses_iby Long Acre cabs, with white-breeched For the whole day he remained moody and silent, tiger—thy yawning impassitives, pococurantisms but at length, with all the generosity of true love, -fix thyself in dandyhood undeliverable. It is he accused himself of being unjust Alice. thy doom.”

to leave a story in which she was so much interested signation by the nature-befitted Julius. merely for a ride, which she can enjoy any day ; When first he met the soft blue eyes of Matilda, and as to music, why truly it does seem out of he swore she was “an angel !" When he encoun. place in the morning. I wonder how I could be so tered the bewitching languor of Alice Welford's absurd as to feel so much offended." And thus dark rolling orbs, he laid his hand where his heart

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was selfish ini mengh a fhbeignet me just to expect her to the condoom which was met with wonderful re

of a wealthy landed proprietor in the neighbour. Mrs. Welford, deceived and blinded by her mahood of Fairdale, between whom and the parents ternal love, saw only the most graceful refinement of Alice there had always existed the warmest in her daughter; while Mr. Welford, good man, friendship--a bond which seemed to unite even although he was at first somewhat puzzled, and more closely the hearts of their children. In child- was heard once or twice to utler an impatient hood they were inseparable, and until Frederick “pish!" at length concluded these new-fangled left for college, scarcely a day passed that the airs were all right, so settled himself contentedly three friends did not meet. Frederick was a

down to his day-book and ledger. young man of promising talents, enthusiastic in Although many of her most intimate friends now his attachments, generous and noble in his feel. shunned the society of Alice, there were some who ings. He would not, it is true, have been consi- not only fancied they admired, but who also strove dered the beau ideal of manly beauty, yet there 10 imitate her every word and motion. Among was a charm in his frank ingenuous countenance, these Matilda Grant shone conspicuously; and which drew all hearts in his favour.

nature having innocently placed a languishing blue Although some years older than Alice, Frederick eye in her little head of light flaxen ringlets, and deemed it no reason why he should not continue given a gentle lisp to her tongue, the mantle of to love the beautiful girl; as to falling in love, he affectation fell not ungracefully around her while never did :-he had adored her with his whole dimpled shoulders. heart and soul from the time she first lisped his Could these young ladies but have seen themname. Nor was he by any means the only one selves as others saw them, how little would their fascinated and made captive by her charms. There self-love have been fallered! for nowhere does was not a youth in the village but felt suicidal if affectation appear more odious than when she she but smiled upon another; and many were the comes with mincing step and languishing simper lines, now lost to fame, penned by some "mute amid the homely scenes of country life. inglorious Milton," which were inspired by her “God made the country, and man made the beauty.

town,” are words which fell from the pen of the At (each vacation, how gladly did Frederick inspired Cowper. It is in the gay thoroughfare hasten to Fairdale, sure of always meeting a joy- of ihe city, therefore, in the glitter of the ball, ful welcome from Alice! He witnessed with room, in the brilliant saloon, or amid the artificial delight the gradual development of her mind and allurements of fashionable life, that affectation may person-in his eye she was perfection. No one be tolerated, although she is everywhere to be iouched the piano with such 'skill; there was no despised. But let her shun the country—the very voice so sweet. No pencil but that of Alice could school of nature, where grace may be learned even have given that living glow to the landscape ; and from the tall grass as it meets the kiss of the her writing--ah! surely some elfin sprite must have sumn:er wind, and where the little blue violet, and guided her little hand!

the spotless lily of the valley, teach lessons of Upon leaving college, Frederick commenced modesty and purity.

Music!--can the opera the study of medicine in Philadelphia. There, send forth sweeter notes than morn and eve day after day, night after night, did the young meet your ear from yonder grove? Hark 10 student toil on in unceasing study, to make for the robin, and the merry bob-o'-link, or to bimself a reputation and a name worthy his beloved the lark trilling her hymn of praise far up in Alice; for not until then, he resolved, would he the azure vauli of beaven! The silvery rill, 100, offer either heart or hand to her acceptance. as it leaps and dances over its pebbly bed, will

But in the meanwhile, o’er the heaven of Alice teach you cheerfulness, and bright-eyed health and Welford's beauty a cloud was rising—a mere speck exercise transfer to your cheek the lovely tints of at first, yet ever increasing, until it overshadowed the rose. her whole lovely person! It was at first difficult to tell why she was less pleasing-for less pleasing Nearly a year of arduous study was passed by she certainly was. Her companions looked from Frederick Waldo ere he again visited 'Fairdale; one to the other, and silently wondered; for so but now, with love, hope, and joy glowing at his well did they all love her, that each one strove to heart, he once more pressed the green sward of his conceal her thoughts within her own bosom. native village. About this time Alice was invited to pass a few As soon as the affectionate greetings of kindred months in the city, and upon her return affectation were interchanged, he flew to the residence of Mr. stood forth too palpable to be longer mistaken! Welford, where he was received with the most

She was now suddenly distressed by fogs and cordial kindness. The natural feelings of Alice moonlight. She took to siglis and sentiment, and triumphed for a while over all affectation, and with in that vein her eyes were set, deep-rolling, tearful. a blush as of old, and a sparkling eye, she extended Her voice was now so fine, “ no sound could live her hand to meet the warm pressure of her early 'twixt it and silence," and if she smiled (for now friend. For that evening Alice was herselfor away with laughter), it was with manner con- perchance some few of her newly acquired graces strained and sickly." A beautiful mouth 100 had shone forth, they were eclipsed in the eyes of her Alice, and beautifully white were the little teeth lover by her more artless manner, and he left her within; yet somehow or other " the pink portico presence intoxicated with love and happiness. with an ivory door” was guarded by a strange But when the next morning Frederick saw Alice, fanciful porter! Her manners and conversation she was languidly reclining upon a sofa, apparently partook also of the same unnatural change. too much absorbed in reading to notice his ap

you ?

worse con

proach. With the prettiest little start in the world, | laying “ the flattering unction to bis soul,” he was Therefore, she raised her head as his band fell soon by the side of Alice. lightly upon her raven tresses, and exclaiming with “It is evening, Alice, the hour for music. You great paihos

will now sing to me.” “Oh, tell me, have you read it ?" buried her face "Oh yes, with pleasure," she replied ; and then in her handkerchief.

seating herself with the most studied gracefulness "What is it, my dear Alice, that distresses you ? at the piano, arranging her profusion of long rings Read what? What sudden calamity has befallen lets, with many other pretty little airs, she turned

in a languishing manner to Frederick, and inquired “Oh! no calamity to myself—but think of the in a soft voice what song he would prefer. A fasufferings of the poor wretched Sophie ! Ah, is it vourile air from La Sunnambula' was named, not enough 10 rend the heart! But you must have with which Alice had often charmed his ear. read • Sophie ?'”

Running her fingers lightly over the keys, the "I confess I have not,” replied Frederick, really fine voice of Alice coinmenced “Still so smiling. “But come, I cannot allow fictitious gently o'er me stealing.” Poor Frederick looked woes to prevent us from enjoying this fine morning. and listened with strangely commingled feelings of Bessie and I have planned a Jiule excursion on pleasure and disgust. It was surely Alice-it was horseback (ever your delight, I remember), and her bird-like voice which fell on his ear! yet so I bave called to ask you to accompany us,

distorted, perverted by theatrical tone and manner, “Really, you are very kind, Mr. Waldo," re- that he could hardly trust his senses. plied Alice; “but nothing could tempt me to “Oh sweet! bewitching ! heavenly !" cried leave this charming book.”

Matilda Grant, clasping her hands, and rolling her "Indeed !” answered Frederick, evidently pretty eyes in ecstasy. piqued by her refusal ; “ I fattered myself the Frederick merely bowed his thanks, and then society of a long absent friend might be of more named a simple Scotch air ; but here, alas ! the value to you. But come, Alice," resuming all his most beautiful song of Burns was wonted frankness of manner, “ do lay aside your founded” with affected simplicity; and after many book. Recollect, for nearly a year I have been vain attempts to elicit some chord which might pent within the walls of a city, and now feel as vibrate to his heart as in other days, Frederick if released from a galling bondage. I wish to turned sorrowfully away, and soon after took leave, enjoy every moment of nature and of you, my dear more unhappy than he had ever felt before, and friend."

perhaps less in love ! “Oh! pray take your ride-do, I beseech of Frederick remained a week in Fairdale. He you," she replied, laying her hand on his arm, saw Miss Welford but seldom, yet each time they and pushing him gently from her. “Do go; did meet served only to disenchant him the more; but pray

, leave me to my delightfully absorbing and when he returned to Philadelphia, to pursue Sophie !"

those studies which for her sake had been so sweet, * Alice !"

life to the young student seemed disrobed of half “I believe I am very nervous this morning,” she its charms. added, as she felt that look of wounded affection fixed upon her; then rising, and slightly blushing, Room now for the elegant Julius Adolphus she walked to the window.

Bubble! Step aside, oh all ye village swains, ye “Since, then, you refuse me the happiness of home-spun youths ! Doff now your caps in your society, you will at least favour' me with humble submission, and come not á betwixi the music-one song, Alice," said Frederick.

wind and his nobility.” “How can you ask me to sing in the inorning? Matilda Grant had a brother; this brother had It really is so outré, so désagréable, as the French a friend, and that friend was Julius Adolphus say; but since you wish it, I will play a favourite Bubble. He came from the far“ sunny south," to air of Matilda Grant's. Have you seen sweet inhale the cool breezes of a northern climeio rusMatilda ? the loveliest creature! Yet I must say, ricate in the native village of his friend. Ah! to attempt eliciting harmony at such an unseason- favoured Fairdale, to receive beneath your rural able hour, does not coincide with my taste." shades this specimen exquisite—the inimitable

“Then pray, Miss Welford, do not disturb Bubble! In the words of Carlyle, he may be best yourself on my account,” replied Frederick, and described. coldly bowing, he left the room.

“ Elegant vacuum! serenely looking down upon As might be expected, there was no riding that all plenums and entities ! The doom of fate was— day. Frederick felt deeply hurt by the conduct “ Be thou a dandy! Have thy eye-glasses, operaof Alice; it was so strange, so unlike herself. glasses—thy Long Acre cabs, with white-breeched For the whole day he remained moody and silent, tiger—thy yawning impassitives, pococurantisms but at length, with all the generosity of true love, -fix thyself in đandyhood undeliverable. It is he accused himself of being unjust io Alice. “If thy doom." was selfish in me," thought he, “to expect her to And a doom which was met with wonderful releave a story in which she was so much interested signation by the nature-befilled Julius. merely for a ride, which she can enjoy any day ; When first he met the soft blue eyes of Matilda, and as to music, why truly it does seem out of he swore she was “an angel !" When he encoun. place in the morning. I wonder how I could be so tered the bewitching languor of Alice Welford's absurd as to feel so much offended.” And thus dark rolling orbs, he laid his hand where his heart

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IN A GREAT MIND.

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the creative powers of the handmaids of fashion. May the history of Alice Welford prove a warnThe purse of Mr. Welford seemed inexhaustible. | ing to those young girls who, in possession of Nothing was spared to render the trousseau of the youth and beauty, still strive by artificial manners fair bride worthy her illustrious destiny.

10 augment their charms; while, to those whom But the Grants tossed their heads in high dis- nature may not have so richly gifted, may it teach dain, and vowed they neither would nor could stay that natural simplicity, ingenuousness of speech, in the place to witness such disgraceful proceed and gentleness of manner, prompted by the ings; so they packed up their clothes, and were feelings of the heart, are charms which not even a off 10 Saratoga, seeking probably a Leihe in the brighter eye or a more rosy cheek can enhance, or waters.

the want thereof diminish. “ On Thursday, then, he will be here,” cried Alice, as she placed a highly perfumed letter upon her dressing-table. Then taking a magnificent sprig of pearls, she placed it in the tresses of her dark hair, and stood before the mirror contem- ARCADE'S COMPLIMENT TO ULISSE. plating with much satisfaction its effect.

Observe now how she smiles, bows, then courts FROM METASTASIO'S ACHILLE IN SCIRO, UPON THE sies as if she were receiving the homage of some VARIOUS COLOURING OF THOUGIT DISPL prince--again, with all the hauteur to be observed to the canuille ; while the beauteous image in the mirror reflects back to her vain mind the comme il faut air with which all must be performed to pro

(Translated by Mrs. Colonel Marianna Hartley.) duce the sensation she desires.

So varied and painted is Heaven, Tired at length of attitudizing, Alice languidly

When Sol, darting beams thro' the rain, took up a newspaper, and in sympathetic vein, cast

Redresed in new glories has risen her eyes first upon the records of Hymen.

To Iris, and colours her train. A shrill scream aroused Mrs. Welford, who was in an adjoining room. She rushed in, and

For no dove to the eye hath more changes, found Alice pale, nearly fainting, with the paper

In glitt'ring her plumes to the sight, clasped tightly in her trembling hand.

Whilst aloft iu the ether she ranges, mother, mother, read this !” she faltered forth.

And turns her gay wing to the light. Scarcely less agitated than her daughter, Mrs. Welford took the paper, and read as follows :“ Married, in New York, by the Rev. Julius Adolphus Bubble, Esq., of R-, Virginia, to Miss Matilda Grant, daughter of T. ANSWERS TO MRS. ABDY'S CHARADE. Grant, Esq., of Fairdale." It seems the enraged Grants resolved that the

“ The sea, the sea, the open sea," perfidious bridegroom elect should not slip like an

So says the song, but not for me empty bubble thus easily through their fingers.

Haih ocean any charm : They fancied him to be rich, and therefore they

Nor would I send the son I love determined he should be the husband of their not

O'er deep and pathless waves to rove, unwilling daughter. Seeing his name in a list of

Lest he should come to harm. arrivals at New York, they proceeded without delay from Saratoga to that city, and by dint of

Lady, in whoni there brightly shines

The light of human reason, threats soon compelled the frightened Bubble to

I wish you in these answering lines, accede to their demands.

All blessings in their season. Alas for Bubble! Wheresoever he turned his

AN OLD CORRESPONDENT. eyes, he saw “breach of promise" written in letters of flame, and being unable to meet “damages,” the debtor's prison rose dark and gloomy in perspective. And thus Matilda Grant became Mrs. Bubble, each caught in the meshes of the net

Nay, gentle lady, cease to mourn; their own artifice had contrived,

Such tears become not thee:
The dear one in yon vessel borue

Athwart the raging sea

Fears not with danger to contend; Years have since passed, and Alice is still un- One thought still spurs him onmarried. Her beauty is on the wane, and her He goes the orphan to befriend. faults have lost even their power to excite compas- Then weep not for thy son, sion. She will probably fall the prey of some for- But trust in Him whose power can still tune hunter.

The angry billows' foam, Frederick Waldo is now the husband of a young And, in his own good season, will girl, as charming, as upaffected as was once the Restore thy wanderer home. object of his early love.

MARY.

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