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LITERATURE.

attractive brilliancy of his discourse (beside which all other sounded dull and vapid), marked the grace

that gave distinction to trifles, and made the Tue Gambler's WIFE. By the Author of "The slightest action imposing, the most ordinary courYoung Prima Donna, “ The Belle of the Fa- tesy of value-tili the speciousness of exterior mily,' “The Old Dower House,” &c., &c., refinement has dazzled us into almost doubting the 3 vols. (Newby.)—Shall we confess that upon a justness of the world's censure; and in our heart first introduction to these volumes, and while yet we have assoiled him of half the sins society laid our acquaintance was limited to the opening chap- to his charge. ters, we had well nigh pronounced them, “flat,

At first, the mere mischief of displacing Balfour stale, and unprofitable;" but only at first is in Maud's affections, and exhibiting his own 100 it that we find a certain jejuneness of expres- generally allowed irresistibleness, induces the unsion and incident, and a want of keeping in principled young man to affect a sentiment, that in the portrait of the heroine; who proud, passionate, the end becomes real, and awakens all the fervour and self-willed, with the seeds of most indomitable of his cousin's impassioned character ; she finds resolution in her composition, is still represented that until now, she has not known the depth, the as confessing a secret that the most ordinary strength of feeling of which she is capable, and strength of mind enables a woman to suppress, without scruple, almost without regret, she flings confessing an (however desired, yet) unasked for off the lightly assumed bonds that should still fetter passion; and afterwards vacillating with regard to her to the deceived and injured Balfour; and on it, till she finds ultimately she has made a mistake, the very night of his return to his father's house, and that her past indelicacy has not even the plea and at the very instant when he is about to claim of strong affection to extenuate it. When, bow, her promise to him, and the fulfilment of bis own, ever, this part of the story is got over, one is led and her family's hopes, she, in the most cold and on insensibly from page to page, and chapter 10 heartless manner, recalls her past assurances, and chapter, till upon opening the second volume, we rejects him. He has followed her to a conserva, found our interest in the story had so kept pace tory, the scene of many a former tête.d-tèle ; and with the action of turning over the leaves, that it in ihe midst of an ardent flow of protestations and was quite impossible 10 put it down, till we had delight, is interrupted by the false girl's artificial followed the fortune of the “Gambler's Wife” to attempts to exculpate herself from the wayward the very close. The heroine of the tale, Maud heartlessness of her past and present conduct. Sutherland, is a spoilt child, beautiful (as all Arthur offered no interruption, and she contiheroines are), but selfish and intractable, as the nuedevery-day specimens of such persons. She has a

“ Drawn together by past associations of our sister May, the very antipode of her own charac- happy childhood, when we were indeed like broter-meek, submissive, self-sacrificing, full of love-ther and sister, we foolishly chose to fancy our, liness in disposition and manner; as her elder sis-selves in love ; 'I was indeed most blameable, and ter is fascinating from the force of her great per- blush with shame when I remember my conduct. sonal beauty. Having no brother, Maud Suther- But I have been the first 10 awake from my dream. land is the presumptive heiress to her father's You must have observed that I have been most estates; and this gives her no litle importance in unhappy of late; I felt I had, as it were, drawn her own estimation, as well as in that of numerous you into the snare, and that you had worked up unsuccessful suitors during her first season in Lon- your imagination to believe you really loved me; don. A well-born, but poor cousin, Arthur Bal- | I knew that the awaking from the delusion would four, visits them on the return of his regiment from be painful. Is it not therefore more kind in me India, and falls desperately in love with the to arouse you from it at once, than to allow you, haughty Maud, who visibly returns his passion; when too late, when bound by irrevocable ties, to but,

discover how much you had been mistaken in your “ That idol of deceit, that empty sound, estimate of our mutual attachment. I ought to Called honour,"

have said this sooner, both for your sake and that forbids him to take advantage of his bonne fortune, of my parents, who, by my folly, my cowardice, till, as we have before said, the lady conceiving may also have been deceived. Dear Arthur, forhis difficulty, throws aside all womanly reserve, give ine.” More earnestly might she have craved and discloses her partiality for him. Nothing can forgiveness could she adequately have imagined be more in unison with the wishes of her parents, the despair, the agony, with which her cold words who delightedly agree to the maich; and the bad struck upon the heart of her listener, freezing young man leaves them for a few probationary the warm hopes which a moment before beamed months, at the end of which he is to reiurn to claim so gladly in his heart; and the proud girl might bis bride. In the meanwhile the Gambler has have even trembled had she gazed on his counappeared on the scene (another cousin), older by tenance after the first stunning sensation had subsome years than Arthur; and in this, as well as in sided. Could it be Arthur? worldly experience, having the advantage of bim. “ Truly, he could scarcely be recognized as he

The character of this clever, subtle, insinuating, i now stood ; his cheek, besore so pale, flushed to heartless man of the world is well drawn; we re- the deepest crimson; his lips, from which soft cognize it immediately, for every one has met his words of love had tremulously proceeded,' tightly duplicate in society--has felt the fascination of compressed, his eyes sparkling with indignation. those frank, easy, cordial manners-listened to the He felt he had been wronged, grievously wronged,

IN A GREAT MIND,

the creative powers of the handmaids of fashion. May the history of Alice Welford prove a warnThe purse of Mr. Welford seemed inexhaustible. ing to those young girls who, in possession of Nothing was spared to render the trousseau of the youth and beauty, still strive by artificial manners fair bride worthy her illustrious destiny.

to augment their charms; while, to those whom But the Grants tossed their heads in high dis- nature may not have so richly gifted, may it teach dain, and vowed they neither would nor could stay that natural simplicity, ingenuousness of speech, in the place to witness such disgraceful proceed and gentleness of manner, prompied by the warm ings ; so they packed up their clothes, and were feelings of the heart, are charms which not even a off 10 Saratoga, seeking probably a Leihe in the brighter eye or a more rosy cheek can enhance, or waters.

the want thereof diminish. “ On Thursday, then, he will be here,” cried Alice, as she placed a highly perfumed letter upon her dressing-table. Then taking a magnificent sprig of pearls, she placed it in the tresses of her dark hair, and stood before the mirror contem- ARCADE'S COMPLIMENT TO ULISSE. plating with much satisfaction its effect.

Observe now how she smiles, bows, then couit- FROM METASTASIO'S ACHILLE IN SCIRO, UPON THE sies as if she were receiving the homage of some

VARIOUS COLOURING OF THOUGHT DISPLAYED prince--again, with all the hauteur to be observed to the canuille ; while the beauteous image in the mirror reflects back to her vain mind the comme il faut air with which all must be performed to

( Translated by Mrs. Colonel Marianna Hartley.)

produce the sensation she desires. Tired at length of attitudizing, Alice languidly

So varied and painted is Heaven,

When Sol, darting beams thro' the rain, took up a newspaper, and in sympathetic vein, cast

Redresed in new glories has risen her eyes first upon the records of Hymen.

To Iris, and colours her train. A shrill scream aroused Mrs. Welsord, who was in an adjoining room. She rushed in, and

For no dove to the eye hath more changes, found Alice pale, nearly fainting, with the paper In glitt'ring her plume to the sight, clasped tightly in her trembling hand. “Oh,

Whilst aloft iu the ether she ranges, mother, mother, read this !” she faltered forth.

And turns her gay wing to the light. Scarcely less agitated than her daughter, Mrs. Welsord took the paper, and read as follows :“ Married, in New York, by the Rev. Julius Adolphus Bubble, Esq., of R-, Virginia, to Miss Matilda Grant, daughter of T. ANSWERS TO MRS. ABDY'S CHARADE. Grant, Esq., of Fairdale." It seems the enraged Grants resolved that the

“ The sea, the sea, the open sea," perfidious bridegroom elect should not slip like an empty bubble thus easily through their fingers.

So says the song, but not for me

Haih ocean any charm : They fancied him to be rich, and therefore they

Nor would I send the son I love determined he should be the husband of their not

O'er deep and pathless waves to rove, unwilling daughter. Seeing his name in a list of

Lest he should come to harm. arrivals at New York, they proceeded without de

Lady, in whoni there brightly shines lay from Saratoga to that city, and by dint of

The light of human reason, threats soon compelled the frightened Bubble to

I wish you in these answering lines, accede to their demands.

All blessings in their season. Alas for Bubble! Wheresoever he turned his

AN OLD CORRESPONDENT. eyes, he saw breach of promise" written in letters of Aame, and being unable to meet “damages," the debtor's prison rose dark and gloomy in perspective. And thus Matilda Grant became Mrs. Bubble, each caught in the meshes of the net

Nay, gentle lady, cease to mourn; their own artifice had contrived.

Such tears become not thee:
The dear one in yon vessel borue

Athwart the raging sea

Fears not with danger to contend; Years have since passed, and Alice is still un- One thought still spurs him onmarried. Her beauty is on the wane, and her He goes the orphan to befriend. faults have lost even their power to excite compas. Then weep not for thy son, sion. She will probably fall the prey of some for- But trust in Him whose power can still tune hunter.

The angry billows' foam, Frederick Waldo is now the husband of a young And, in his own good season, will girl, as charming, as unaffected as was once the Restore thy wanderer home. object of his early love.

MARY.

LITERATURE.

attractive brilliancy of his discourse (beside which all other sounded dull and vapid), marked the grace

that gave distinction to trifles, and made the Tue Gambler's Wife. By the Author of "The slightest action imposing, the most ordinary courYoung Prima Donna, "The Belle of the Fa- tesy of value-till the speciousness of exterior mily,” “The Old Dower House," &c., &c., refinement has dazzled us into almost doubting the 3 vols. (Newby.)—Shall we confess that upon a justness of the world's censure; and in our heart first introduction to these volumes, and while yet we have assoiled him of half the sins society laid our acquaintance was limited to the opening chap to his charge. ters, we had well nigh pronounced them, "flat,

At first, the mere mischief of displacing Balfour stale, and unprofitable;" but only at first is in Maud's affections, and exhibiting bis own 100 it that we find a certain jejuneness of expres- generally allowed irresistibleness, induces the vnsion and incident, and a want of keeping in principled young man to affect a sentiment, that in the portrait of the heroine ; who proud, passionate, the end becomes real, and awakens all the fervour and self-willed, with the seeds of most indomitable of his cousin's impassioned character ; she finds resolution in her composition, is still represented that until now, she has not known the depth, the as confessing a secret that the most ordinary strength of feeling of which she is capable, and strength of mind enables a woman to suppress, without scruple, almost without regret, she flings confessing an (however desired, yel) unasked for off the lightly assumed bonds that should still felter passion ; and afterwards vacillating with regard to her to the deceived and injured Balfour; and on it, till she finds ultimately she has made a mistake, the very night of his return to his father's house, and that her past indelicacy has not even the plea and at ihe very instant when he is about to claim of strong affection to extenuate it. When, how, her promise to him, and the fulfilment of bis own, ever, this part of the story is got over, one is led and her family's hopes, she, in the most cold and on insensibly from page to page, and chapter to heartless manner, recalls her past assurances, and chapter, till upon opening the second volume, we rejects him. He has followed her to a conserva, found our interest in the story had so kept, pace tory, the scene of many a former tête-à-tête ; and with the action of turning over the leaves, that it in the midst of an ardent flow of protestations and was quite impossible 10 put it down, till we had delight, is interrupted by the false girl's artificial followed the fortune of the “Gambler's Wife” 10 attempts to exculpate herself from the wayward the very close. The heroine of the tale, Maud heartlessness of her past and present conduct. Sutherland, is a spoilt child, beautiful (as all Arthur offered no interruption, and she contiberoines are), but selfish and intractable, as the nuedevery-day specimens of such persons. She has a

“ Drawn together by past associations of our sister May, the very antipode of her own charac- happy childhood, when we were indeed like broter-meek, submissive, self-sacrificing, full of love-ther and sister, we foolishly chose to fancy our, liness in disposition and manner; as her elder sis. selves in love ; 'I was indeed most blameable, and ter is fascinating from the force of her great per- blush with shame when I remember my conduct. sonal beauty. Having no brother, Maud Suther- But I have been the first 10 awake from my dream. land is the presumptive heiress to her father's You must have observed that I have been most estates; and this gives her no little importance in unhappy of late; I felt I had, as it were, drawn unsuccessful suitors during her first season in Lons you into the snare, and that you had worked up

your imagination to believe you really loved me; don. A well-born, but poor cousin, Arthur Bal- | I knew that the awaking from the delusion would four, visits them on the return of his regiment from be painful. Is it not therefore more kind in me India, and falls desperately in love with the

to arouse you from it at once, than to allow you, haughty Maud, who visibly returns his passion ; when too late, when bound by irrevocable ties, to but,

discover how much you had been mistaken in your “ That idol of deceit, that empty sound, estimate of our mutual attachment. I ought to Called honour,"

have said this sooner,

both for your sake and that forbids him to take advantage of his bonne fortune, of my parents, who, by my folly, my cowardice, till, as we have before said, the lady conceiving may also have been deceived. Dear Arthur, forhis difficulty, throws aside all womanly reserve, give me.” More earnestly might she have craved and discloses her partiality for him. Nothing caú forgiveness could she adequately have imagined be more in unison with the wishes of her parents, the despair, the agony, with which her cold words who delightedly agree to the match ; and the had struck upon the heart of her listener, freezing young man leaves them for a few probationary the warm hopes which a moment before beamed months, at the end of which he is to reiurn to claim so gladly in his heart; and the proud girl might his bride. In the meanwhile the Gambler has have even trembled had she gazed on his coun. appeared on the scene (another cousin), older by tenance after the first stunning sensation had subsome years than Arthur; and in this, as well as in sided. Could it be Arthur? worldly experience, having the advantage of him. ; “Truly, he could scarcely be recognized as he

The character of this clever, subtle, insinuating, now stood ; his cheek, before so pale, flushed to heartless man of the world is well drawn; we re- the deepest crimson; his lips, from which soft cognize it immediately, for every one has met his words of love had tremulously proceeded, ' tightly duplicate in society-has felt the fascination of compressed, his eyes sparkling with indignation. those frank, easy, cordial manners-listened to the , He felt he had been wronged, grievously wronged,

BY TIIE COUNTESS OF BLESSINGTON.

those whose admiration for the poem has inclined | romance with the sober lessons of history. It is them, though they have not yet had the opportu- long since we have met with so appropriate a prenity, to commit it to memory.

sent for the young of her own sex as Miss BunThe Annuals.-We purpose reviewing the heroine of the work; and the author has showo no

bury's memoir of Anne Boleyn, for she is the Annuals next month ; meanwhile we extract a

small degree of judgment and skill in handling a clever and sparkling poem from the versatile pen of the accomplished Countess of Blessington. "It subject so fit for an example, and yet so difficult

in the “ Keepsake." appears

properly to treat.

Pawser's Ladies' FASHIONABLE REPOSITORY, “SOLILOQUY OF A MODERN FINE LADY.

for 1845.-(Longman.) Brilliant in scarlet and gold, and enamel, this is by far the handsomest

pocket-book we have seen, Besides almanac “ How dull it is 10 sit all day,

memoranda, &c., it contains several fine engrave With nought on earth to do,

ings, and a vast number of enigmas and conunBut think of concerts, balls, or routs,

drums, some of the latter being really good. We Ai evening to go to !

cannot say much for the original verses, except Perplex'd between a robe of pink,

that their quantity is more remarkable than their Or blue celeste, or white,

quality. Why not select gems of poetry, which Or visits one is forced to pay,

are better worth repeating ihan the fresh effusions Or little notes lo write.

of mediocrity are worth printing? Ilow tedious in the park to drive,

Tue FUNNY Almanac, for 1845.—(Lover, Each day the same dull round,

Bolt Court.) There is certainly more than six. And see the stupid visages

pennyworth of laughter in the “ Funny Almanac." That there are always found;

The sketch by Phiz of “ Fire Insurances Expire," Come home a half an hour too late

though probably suggested by Punch's statues For dinner, dress in haste,

going out of town, is really capital. While husband swears the fish is spoilt, CHRONICLES OF Tur BASTILE, with IllustraAnd ven'son lost its taste !

tions on Steel by Robert Cruikshank.-(Newby.) Ilow vexiug 'tis to have such tastes

From the odd number of this work which has As thousands can't supply,

come before us, we feel sure it is one of no comAnd ev'ry pretty thing one sees

mon power and interest. As may be imagined, no To still be sure to buy ;

richer field for high-wrought romance could have Then meet one's husband's surly glance

been found iban“ Chronicles of the Bastile ;" At each new cap or robe,

though that the terrible must mix with it, is of As if into one's bills he'd

course a painful matter-of-course.

pry, Extravagance to probe!

The Orpian; or, Memoirs op MATILDE. How tiresome then at dinner too

By Eugène Sue; illustrated by Robert CruikTo have no appetite,

shank ; translaled by the Hon. D. G. Osborne. Because a luncheon one has had,

No. 1.-(Newby.)

It is not easy from the first Or corset laced too tight;

number of a serial work to predicate the tone and Then hnd a glass of iced champagne,

character it may afterwards take, and the present, Though mixed with water pure,

with its clever illustration, is no exception to the Has made oue's nose a little red,

general rule; we may, however, say, that the A misery to endure!

opening is niost interesting, and we have sufficient

faith in the power of the author to believe that it How wearying at night to drive

must be ably continued. We hope it may prove To op'ra, rout, or ball,

the sort of work which the English will be right in And find the last is sure to be

transferring to their own tongue. We are not quite The dullest scene of all;

sure of this matter yet. Then tired and cross, at last return

To home with aching head,
And quarrel with one's yawning maid, AMUSEMENTS OF THE MONTH.

Before one gels 10 bed ;
Then find one's couch a sleepless one,

SADLER's Wells.
The pillow all awry,
The downy bed uneven grown,

Phelps and Mrs. Warner continue that great
Enough to make one cry;

run of success and popularity which their efforts Then wake next morn at half-past twelve,

have so richly deserved. The production of the All languid and deprest,

City Madam, and of the Lady of Lyons, has been And know that each succeeding day

greeled with the most liemendous applause. Both Will dull be as the rest!"

of these plays are too well known to require any

comment on our part. The City Madam of The Star of the Court. By Miss S. Bunbury, Phelps and Mrs. Warner, is the Riches of Maauthor of “ Combe Abbey.” (Grant and Grif-cready; and Sadler's Wells need not be ashamed fith, successors to Hurris.)- This is a charming to bold up its head beside any of the larger thealittle volume, combining all the fascination of a tres. Indeed, we almost prefer Phelps to Ma

cready in this part. Bulwer's beautiful play of (Mr. Buckstone), the clerk or servant of Littleton, the Lady of Lyons, with Phelps as Claude Mel is the sympathizing listener to his master's tale of notte, and Mrs. Warner as Pauline, was most woe, when the post brings a letter from the Yorkpowerfully sustained ; and, as a natural conse- shire squire, somewhat unceremoniously rejecting quence of such fine acting, the house is literally an application which Littleton had made for a crammed every night. Several novelties are an- loan, and reproaching him with bis extravagant nounced to be produced here, to which we shall habits. Littleton, like all spendthrifts, is mightily devole ample space, as we are most anxious 10 indignant that another person should be indisposed support, by every means, this most creditable to part with his cash for the purchase of pleasures effort in favour of the national drama, an effort in which he has no participation, but probably which richly deserves some marked public demon- abhors, and votes his brother a bore. Another stration of approbation.

visitor now appears upon the scene, in the shape of DRURY LANE.

Lord Charles Roebuck (Mr. H. Holl), an old Though since our last nothing new in the absent from England. In the conversation that

chum of Littleton's, and who has been some time musical way has been produced, yet has the enter

ensues between Lord Charles and his friend, we prising manager continued to supply a most varied round of popular operas ; the Syren, the Bohemian match which his father, Lord Pompion (Mr. Til

learn that the young nobleman is disinclined to the Girl, the Sonnambula, Der Freischutz, &c., hav-bury), has provided for him in the person of a ing been given in rapid succession. Adele Dumilatre and Mademoiselle Plunket, (Madame Vestris), and is, of course, rapturously

rich and beautiful widow, Lady Alice Hawthorn the former perhaps the best French danseuse, not in love with another, Miss Rocket (Julia Bennett), excepting one, who has visited this country, have the daughter of a peppery East India colonel been exceedingly popular in the very clever ballet of the Beauty of Ghent; which, with the Corsair (played by Mr. Strickland), but who is in opposiand Revolt of the Harem, have been the after- heads together to circumvent the plans of the earl.

tion to Lord Pompion. The young men lay their pieces.

Littleton is to go down to the borough which A new tragic opera will have been brought out

Lord Pompion desires bis son to represent, and, ere this is perused by the public, but too late in the month to give us an opportunity of expressing

by this preconcerted and friendly opposition, to be

returned--Lord Charles offering to help his an opinion of its merits. We shall amply com

friend to the hand and fortune of Lady Alice, if pensate for this next month.

Littleton can aid him in obtaining those of Miss Covext GARDEN.

Rocket, a proposal 10 which, as may be expected, Monsieur Jullien's annual series of concerts com.

the briefless barrister has no objection. While menced a week or so back, and they have hitherto

in conversation, the two friends are interrupted by been attended with that ample success which their

Bob, who alarms his master with the intelligence moderate price, excellent music, and agreeable no

that two persons, whom he takes to be an attorney velties so richly deserve. The bill of fare is nightly

and a bailiff

, are approaching. Exeunt, therefore, most rich and varied, and the performers are of the in, great baste, Littleton, with bis friend Lord first order of merit. Mozart's grand Jupiter Sym- Tom Cohe, who has come to visit his brother, ac

Charles. The new comers, however, prove to be phony we never saw produced under more advantageous circumstances; while Jullien's real companied by Rural (Mr. Farren), a simplePolka is decidedly the best version of that popular minded, well-meaning country parson, who has air. We regret that this cheap and excellent been tutor to both the brothers in their youth. musical entertainment will last for so short a

Their object is to affect a reconciliation between period ; but we invite all who love good music, Tom and Littleton, and to reclaim the latter from admirably played, to avail themselves of this op- the error of his ways; but Bob, still under his portunity of being pleased, nay, delighted. misapprehension as to their real characters, uses

sundry offensive epithets to both ; and Tom, supHAYMARKET.

posing this conduct 10 be the result of his brother's A comedy, by the author of London Assurance, | orders, indignantly retires. The next act brings under the litle of Old Heads and Young Hearts, us 10 the drawing-room of the Eurl of Pompion, has been produced here with very considerable where we are presented 10 the Countess (Mrs. W.

The plot, or effect of the plot, is far less Clifford); and here all the principal characters brilliant than that of its predecessor; though had assemble, and commence their several actions. it equalled in its latter portion the two first acts, it Littleton pays court to the beautiful and eccentric would certainly have been a sterling English | Lady Alice, and succeeds in stealing her heart; comedy, and as it is it will do great credit to the then he poutingly, and like a sulky, underbred author's reputation.

school-boy, rejects the advances for a reconcilia. In the commencement we are introduced to tion which his brother, who is a fine, frank-hearted, Litlleton Coke (Mr. Charles Matthews), a brief- manly fellow, makes towards him. Tom also falls less barrister, seated in his chambers in the in love with Lady Alice, and thus all parties are at Temple, and lamenting that he should have a cross purposes. But at this point we must abanwretched pillance of seven hundred a year, so un- don all hope of unravelling the plot, or following equal to bis ambitious desires, while his brother in up the incidents which lead to the denouementYorkshire, Tom Coke (Mr. Webster), is in the namely, the marriages of Lord Charles with Miss bland enjoyment of coal-pits and cash. Bob Rocket, and of Littleton with Lady Alice for any

success.

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