Page images
PDF
EPUB

attempt at describing the mysterious means by had construed into indisputable proofs of the which these events were brought about could only lady's attachment to liim; the husband, however, reduce our readers to the same hopeless state of trumps every card played by the lover, by disbewilderment with which we contemplated them. closing some stronger mark of Mrs. Lorimer's Something there was of a double elopement, semi- affection for him. The lover at last describes a political, semi-matrimonial, with the beroes dis. scene in which, according to bis belief, the widow guised as grooms and postilions-of a paragraph has lacitly admitted his intrusions. They were in the Morning Post, announcing the elopeinent, alone in the library, Furnival was reading to her indeed correctly, but attaching each lady to the some tale of romance until the clock struck wrong gentleman-of Littleton being returned for twelve; “Then, sir," said he, “I arose, 100k down Closeborough by a great majority over Lord my hat and departed.” “And I,” replied the Charles, but for what purpose we could not see, nor husband, “on similar occasions, hung up my by what means comprehend; and all the confusion hat, and remained." This candid avowal fills occasioned by the simplicity of poor Rural, who goes the young lawyer with indignation, and he insists about with the best intentions possible, interfering, upon the calumny upon the honour of the purest apparently without knowing it, in everybody's of her sex being instantly recanted, which probusiness, wishing to make everybody happy, but duces an acknowledgment from Lorimer somewhat dreadfully discomposed at last, on finding that he in the manner of that rendered 10 Laura's cavalier, has made everybody miserable. Tom Coke is the in Byron's poem of “ Beppo.” best sustained and most complete character in the play. He has singleness of purpose, honesly of

“Sir," quoth the Tuik,“ 'is no mistake at all, mind, and nobleness of heari, and yet he is dis

That lady is my wise!" appointed in his affections ; for Ludy Alice prefers Lorimer, in order to extricate himself from the his brother Littleton, a selfislı, ill-conditioned fel. dilemma in which he has placed himself, now low,

declares that he is ready to renew his allegiance 10 The applause was perfectly uproarious. We Arabella, and marry her. And here the piece shall again see it, and may ihen perhaps give a might have been judiciously ternsinated, but fresh better opinion of its merits than we can from the entangleinents are produced by Mrs. Lorimer stormy excitement of a first

appearance,

planning to punish her husband for his groundless

jealousy, and Furnival for his vanity and fickleness. Princess's.

This she effects by causing Arabella to write a This admirable little theatre continues every letter to her faithless swain, which is so ambigunight to enjoy the privilege of drawing crowded ously worded that he imagines it comes from Mrs. houses, and deservedly; the entertainments being of Lorimer, and instantly relapses into his adoration the most popular and amusing character. The va- for her. The tangled plot is, however, cleared at riety too is singularly great. The Widow Bewilched length; the gay deceiver is obliged to return to his is a most amusing and clever production, full of old love, and the delighted husband finds his wife capital bits and good situations. The plot is to be a pattern of virtue for all widows bewitched. slight, and perbaps flimsy, but being acted with Don Casur de Bazan, which the sterling care. great ability, especially by Mrs. Stirling, was com- less humour and the native under-current of pletely successful. Mr. Lorimer (Granby), for feeling displayed by Wallack bave rendered so some unexplained reason, is obliged to quit completely successful, continues nightly to receive England, and spread a report that he is dead ; his the utmost applause. Perhaps it is the very best wife is consequently supposed to be a widow. drama which France has produced for many years, Clement Furnival (Walter Lacy), a young lawyer, and the version here given is, by far, the most bas been paying his aildresses to Arabella (Miss effective, as well as the best acted. After this, a E. Honner), but attracted by the superior charms very capital ballet, The Enchanted Bell, has been and accomplishments of her aunt, Mrs. Lorimer nightly applauded. We never saw a ballet sup(Mrs. Stirling), he transfers his affections to the ported by more superb and admirable scenes. latter lady. The niece discovers the infidelity of The illusion is perfect, and great credit is due to her lover, and quarrels with him. At this stage the talented artist. A comic opera, The Four of the affair the widow's husband returns, and Brothers Aymon, has been very well received ; as becomes rather uneasy at finding Clement Furni. also Prediction-a new version of Satan. val established on such a familiar footing in the

LYCEUM. house, while the young lawyer, imagining from the easy appearance of the stranger that he is also a The irresistible Keeleys continue to draw candidate for the widow's hand, tells him frankly crowded houses, and to excile roars of laughter. that he is himself in love with Mrs. Lorimer, and To Persons about to Marry, and A Trip to that any one who disputes the prize with him Kissinger, are the only norelties, if we except a must fight him. Lorimer, though he acknow- very ineffective spectacle, The Seven Castles of ledges his passion for the lady, declines this the Passions, which may be put aside at the earliest barbarous mode of deciding their pretensions, but opportunity with advantage to the management. purposes that each shall honestly confess the encou- The light pieces, however, are happy in the ragement that he had received from the widow, extreme. and upon which he had presumed that he was the

STRAND, object of her tender regards. Furnival consents, The Knight and the Sprite; or, The Cold Water and relates various circumstances which bis vanity Cure-of which the plot is as follows has been

cready in this part. Bulwer's beautiful play of | (Mr. Buckstone), the clerk or servant of Littleton, the Lady of Lyons, with Phelps as Clarde Mel is the sympathizing listener to his master's tale of notte, and Mrs. Warner as Pauline, was most woe, when the post brings a letter from the Yorkpowerfully sustained ; and, as a natural conse- shire squire, somewhat unceremoniously rejecting quence of such fine acting, the house is literally an application which Littleton bad made for a crammed every night. Several novelties are an- loan, and reproaching him with his extravagant nounced to be produced here, to which we shall habiís. Littleton, like all spendibrists, is mightily devole ample space, as we are most anxious 10 indignant that another person should be indisposed support, by every means, this most creditable to part with his cash for the purchase of pleasures effort in favour of the national drama, an effort in which he has no participation, but probably which richly deserves some marked public demon- abhors, and votes his brother a bore. Another stration of approbation.

visitor now appears upon the scene, in the shape of DRURY LANE.

Lord Charles Roebuck (Mr. H. Holl), an old Though since our last nothing new in the chum of Littleton's

, and who has been some time musical way has been produced, yet has the enter- absent from England. In the conversation that prising manager continued to supply a most varied learn that the young nobleman is disinclined 10 the

ensues between Lord Charles and his friend, we round of popular operas ; the Syren, the Bohemian Girl, the Sonnambula, Der Freischutz, &c., hav- bury), has provided for him in ihe person of a

match which his father, Lord Pompion (Mr. Tiling been given in rapid succession. Adele Dumilatre and Mademoiselle Plunket,

rich and beautiful widow, Lady Alice Hawthorn the former perhaps the best French danseuse, noi (Madame Vestris), and is, of course, rapturously excepting one, who has visited this country, have the daughter of a peppery East India colonel

in love with another, Miss Rocket (Julia Bennett), been exceedingly popular in the very clever ballet of the Beauty of Ghent; which, wiih the Corsair (played by Mr. Strickland), but who is in opposiand Revolt of the Harem, have been the after- heads together to circumvent the plans of the earl.

tion to Lord Pompion. The young men lay their pieces. A new tragic opera will have been brought out Lord Pompion desires his son to represent, and,

Littleton is to go down to the borough which ere this is perused by the public, but too late in the month to give us an opportunity of expressing by this preconcerted and friendly opposition, to be an opinion of its merits. We shall amply com- friend to the hand and fortune of Lady Alice, if

returned -- Lord Charles offering to help his pensale for this next month.

Littleton can aid him in obtaining those of Miss Covent Garden.

Rocket, a proposal to which, as may be expected, Monsieur Jullien's annual series of concerts com- the briefless barrister has no objection. While menced a week or so back, and they have hitherto in conversation, the two friends are interrupted by been attended with that ample success which their Bob, who alarnis liis master with the intelligence moderate price, excellent music, and agreeable no- that two persons, whom he takes to be an attorney velties so richly deserve. The bill of fare is nightly and a bailiff, are approaching. Exeunt, therefore, most rich and varied, and the performers are of the in great baste, Littleton, with bis friend Lord first order of merit. Mozari's grand Jupiter Sym- Charles. The new comers, however, prove to be phony we never saw produced under more ad Tom Coke, who has come to visit his brother, acvantageous circumstances; while Jullien's real companied by Rural (Mr. Farren), a simplePolka is decidedly the best version of that popular minded, well-meaning country parson, who has air. We regret that this cheap and excellent been tutor to both the brothers in their youth. musical entertainment will last for so short a

Their object is to affect a reconciliation between period ; but we invite all who love good music, Tom and Littleton, and to reclaim the latter from admirably played, to avail themselves of this op- the error of his ways ; but Bob, still under his portunity of being pleased, nay, delighted.

misapprehension as to their real characters, uses

sundry offensive epithets to both; and Tom, supHAYMARKET.

posing this conduci to be the result of his brother's A comedy, by the author of London Assurance, orders, indiynantly retires. The next act brings under the title of Old Heads and Young Hearts, us 10 ihe drawing-room of the Earl of Pompion, has been produced here with very considerable where we are presented to the Countess (Mrs. W. success, The plot, or effect of the plot, is far less Clifford); and here all the principal characters brilliant than inat of its predecessor; though had assemble, and commence their several actions. it equalled in its latter portion the two first acts, it | Littleton pays court to the beautiful and eccentric would certainly have been a sterling English Lady Alice, and succeeds in stealing her heart; comedy, and as it is it will do great credit to the then he poutingly, and like a sulky, underbred author's reputation.

school-boy, rejects the advances for a reconcilia. In the commencement we are introduced to tion which his brother, who is a fine, frank-hearted, Lillleton Coke (Mr. Charles Matthews), a brief- manly fellow, makes towards him. Tom also falls less barrister, seated in his chanibers in the in love with Lady Alice, and thus all parties are at Temple, and lamenting that he should have a cross purposes. But at this point we must abanwretched pillance of seven hundred a-year, so un- don all hope of unravelling the plot, or following equal 10 bis ambitious desires, while his brother in up the incidents which lead to the denouementYorkshire, Tom Coke (Mr. Webster), is in the namely, the marriages of Lord Charles with Miss bland enjoyment of coal-pits and cash. Bob Rocket, and of Littleton with Ludy Alice for any attempt at describing the mysterious means by had construed into indisputable proofs of the which these events were brought about could only lady's allachment to him; the husband, however, reduce our readers 10 the same hopeless state of trumps every card played by the lover, by disbewilderment with which we contemplated them. closing some stronger mark of Mrs. Lorimer's Something there was of a double elopement, semi- affection for him. The lover at last describes a political, semi-matrimonial, with the beroes dis. scene in which, according to bis belief, the widow guised as grooms and postilions of a paragraph has lacitly admitted_his intrusions. They were in the Morning Post, announcing the elopement, alone in the library, Furnival was reading to her indeed correctly, but attaching each lady to the some tale of romance until the clock struck wrong gentleman-of Littleton being returned for twelve; “Then, sir,” said he, “I arose, 100k down Closeborough by a great majority over Lord my hat and departed.” “And I," replied the Charles, but for what purpose we could not see, nor husband, “on similar occasions, hung up my by what means comprehend; and all the confusion hat, and reinained.” This candid avowai fills occasioned by the simplicity of poor Rural, who goes the young lawyer with indignation, and he insists about with the best intentions possible, interfering, upon the calumny upon the honour of the purest apparently without knowing it, in everybody's of her sex being instantly recanted, which probusiness, wishing to make everybody happy, but duces an acknowledgment from Lorimer somewhat dreadfully discomposed at last, on finding that he in the manner of that rendered 10 Laura's cavalier, has made' everybody miserable. Tom Coke is the in Byron's poem of “ Beppo.” best sustained and most complete character in the play. He bas singleness of purpose, honesty of

“Sir," quoth the Tuik, “ 'is no mistake at all,

That lady is my wise !" mind, and nobleness of heart, and yet he is disappointed in his affections ; for Lady Alice prefers Lorimer, in order to extricate himself from the his brother Littleton, a selfish, ill-conditioned fel. dilemma in which he has placed himself, now low.

declares that he is ready to renew bis allegiance to The applause was perfectly uproarious. We Arabella, and marry her. And here the piece shall again see it, and may ihen perhaps give a might have been judiciously terminated, but fresh better opinion of its merits than we can from the entanglements are produced by Mrs. Lorimer stormy excitement of a first appearance.

planning to punish her husband for his groundless

jealousy, and Furnival for his vanity and fickleness. Princess's.

This she effects by causing Arabella to write a This admirable little theatre continues every letter to her faithless swain, which is so ambigunight to enjoy the privilege of drawing crowded ously worded that he imagines it comes from Mrs. houses, and deservedly; the entertainments being of Lorimer, and instantly relapses into his adoration the most popular and amusing character. The va- for her. The tangled plot is, however, cleared at riety too is singularly great. The Widow Bewitched length; the gay deceiver is obliged to relurn to his is a most amusing and clever production, full of old lore, and the delighted husband finds his wife capital bits and good situations. The plot is to be a pattern of virtue for all widows bewitched. slight, and perhaps flimsy, but being acted with Don Casar de Bazan, which the sterling care. great ability, especially by Mrs. Stirling, was com- less humour and the native under-current of pletely successful. Mr. Lorimer (Granby), for feeling displayed by Wallack have rendered so some unexplained reason, is obliged 10 quit completely successful, continues nightly to receive England, and spread a report that he is dead ; his the utmost applause. Perhaps it is the very best wife is consequently supposed 10 be a widow. drama which France has produced for many years, Clement Furnival (Walter Lacy), a young lawyer, and the version here given is, by far, the most has been paying his addresses to Arabella (Miss effective, as well as the best acted. Aster this, a E. Honner), but attracted by the superior charms very capital ballet, The Enchanted Bell, has been and accomplishments of her aunt, Mrs. Lorimer niglitly applauded. We never saw a ballet sup(Mrs. Stirling), he transfers his affections to the ported by more superb and admirable scenes. latter lady. The niece discovers the infidelity of The illusion is perfeci, and great credit is due io her lover, and quarrels with him. At this stage the talented artist. A comic opera, The Four of the affair the widow's husband returns, and Brothers Aymon, has been very well received ; as becomes rather uneasy al finding Clement Furni- also Prediction-a new version of Sutan. val established on such a familiar footing in the

LYCEUM. house, while the young lawyer, imagining from the easy appearance of the stranger that lie is also a The irresistible Keeleys continue to draw candidate for the widow's hand, tells liim frankly crowded houses, and to excite roars of laughter, that he is himself in love with Mrs. Lorimer, and To Persons about to Marry, and A Trip to that any one who disputes the prize with him Kissinger, are the only novelties, if we except a must fight bim. Lorimer, though he acknow- very ineffective spectacle, The Seven Castles of ledyes luis passion for the lady, declines this the Passions, which may be put aside at the earliest barbarous mode of deciding their pretensions, but opportunity with advantage to the management. purposes that each shall honestly confess the encou- Tlie light pieces, however, are happy in the ragement that he had received from the widow, extreme. and upon which he bad presumed that he was the

STRAND, object of iner tender regards. Furnival consents, The Knight and Sprite ; or, The Cold Water and relates various circumstances which bis vanity Cure-of which the plot is as follows-has been 381

FASHIONS FOR DECEMBER.

singularly successful. Sir Hildebrand (Mrs. Wal- | The improbability of the plot is nothing; it tells ter Lacy), the lover of Bertilda (Mrs. Coleman well, and that is the great consideration. Pope), an old baron's only daughter, whose beart and band are also coveted by Sir Florian (Mrs. Montgomery), travelling to execute some difficult

Miss Farrell, whom we discovered a short time enterprise by his lady love's desire, is obliged 10 ago at Margate, has made her appearance in the take shelter during a heavy shower of rain in the metropolis among the “Ilistrionics,'' ai St. James's coltage of Jan Tickletrouiz (Mr. R. Romer), an

theatre. She had little to do, however, in the poor old fisherman, and his frau (Mrs. C. Melville). little part of Kathline in the Poor Soldier, and we There the knight sees and falls over head and ears

hope to see her on a more bustling stage. She in love with Ondine, the fisherman's adopted has a spendid figure, and a pretty Irish face, brimdaughter, whom he had found an infant exposed ming over with droll smiles, that evidently gush on the beach on the very day that he had lost his up from the heart. She has an accurate knowledge own child. Sir Hildebrand marries Ondine, and of stage business, which gives her an air of perfect returns to his “father's hall,” accompanied by his self-possession; and her voice, although it still bride and Dabblehorn (Mr. H. Hall), a being wants some drilling, is both sweet and powerful. described as “half demon half Dutchinan," who acts as a kind of protector 10 Ondine. Meanwhile Bertilda, deserted by one lover, is bestowing

FASHIONS FOR DECEMBER. her hand upon Sir Florian, when an awkward revelation is made by the demon that the lady is

Rue du Faubourg St. Honoré, not the daughter of the baron, but of Tickletroulz,

à Paris, November 24. the fisherman, which causes the match to be broken off. Sir Hildebrand, now a wedded The aristocracy of birth, as well as that of man, begins to neglect his wife, and essays money, are beginning to return to Paris, but as “ particular attention to his former love, Bertilda. yet slowly. In a few weeks more tbe season will He invites her to accompany him on a marine be fairly opened, and Paris will exhibit more than excursion in the Lily steainer, of which Dabble- its usual splendour, for the marriage of the Duc horn acts as captain, and this personage being d'Aumale is expected to be celebrated by a number convinced of the infidelity of Sir Hildebrand to his of public sétes. We have more than usual variety in lawful spouse, causes the steamer to sink with all our promenade costumes, particularly in mandles ; her passengers to the bottom of the sea. The I have sent you some of the most novel, i cold water effects a sudden improvement in the may cite also the manteaux russes, composed of morals of Sir Hildebrand, who upon the appear- velvet, and lined with white satin. They are the ance of Ondine on the deck of the steamer, smallest of the fashionable cloaks, and are worn returns to his matrimonial allegiance, and is only in carriage dress, or for an evening wrap. A instantly transported by her to her private residence good many are trimmed with grébe. The furriers in the well known 'Caves of Coral," Bertilda, are striving to bring their tur again into vogue, but Sir Florian, and the fisherman and his wife, being I don't think they will be very successful. sent up by a special conveyance 10 their former Several satin mantles have a velvei pelerine de. quarters. The fiend Dabblehorn was admirably scending as low as the waist behind, drawn in so played by Mr. H. Hall; it was a bit of genuine as to form a very small jacket just at the back; it burlesque, and told immensely. His imitation of descends in the heart form in front, and is laced 0. Smith when he first rises through the stage, on the shoulders, so that sitting close to the and his song to the bigger air of “Old Dan shape it forms it very gracefully. The manteaux Tucker,” were loudly applauded. Mr. Romer mantelets, also composed of velvet, and lined with also made the part of Jan Ticklètroutz very funny satin, are just introduced; they are made open at by the grave drollery of his pantomime. Mrs. the sides, and laced, as are also the sleeves, which Walter Lacy's part could hardly be termed bur- are very large. A new kind of passementerie is lesque; she played it with great taste.

employed for the lacing, but the round of the

mantelet is always trimmed either with fur or an ADELPOT.

embroidery in chenille. The manteau d'Aumale The Mysterious Stranger, which is as far may be either of velvet or satin ; if the former, superior to Prediction at the Princess's, as their it is lined with satin; if the latter, the Don Cæsar de Bazan is to the Adelphi's, has lining is either gros de Naples, or peluche drawn night after night with unabated interest. de soie. It is made to the shape at the back, It is a most effective piece, and the gentlemanly straight, but not very wide on the bust in front, acting of Hudson, the mysterious doings and dis- with a deep falling collar of fur; the round of the guises of Madame Celesie, and the rich humour of mantle, and the sleeves, which are very large, is Wright, give it double zest. The appearance of bordered to correspond. Ermine is employed for Madame Celeste as Satan, first in the disguise of velvet, and sable for satin cloaks. The paletots a Paris dandy, then a ball-room belle, then a of the form described in my last, are more than French boy, then as a Chinese princess, then as ever in vogue. Mantles are all made with sleeves : a creole officer, and lastly as a very pretty woman, some have very large ones, others are only of an was singularly pleasing to the audience. The easy width; that depends on the fancy of the fright of Wright at bis contact with

Mantles have lost nothing of their width rich, while Celeste acts with her usual talent.) at bottom, but they are narrower than last year at

is very

wearer.

[graphic][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small]
« PreviousContinue »