The Life of Joseph Priestley, LL.D., F.R.S.,etc. Etc: With Critical Observations on His Works

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Wilks, Grafton, & Company, 1804 - 112 pages
 

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Page 87 - Who art thou that judgest another man's servant? to his own master he standeth or falleth ; yea, he shall be holden up: for God is able to make him stand.
Page 70 - The stars shall fade away, the sun himself Grow dim with age, and Nature sink in years, But thou shalt flourish in immortal youth, Unhurt amidst the war of elements, The wreck of matter, and the crush of worlds.
Page 91 - And through the smooth barbarity of courts, With firm but pliant virtue, forward still To urge his course : him for the studious shade Kind nature form'd, deep, comprehensive, clear, Exact, and elegant ; in one rich soul, Plato, the Stagyrite, and Tully join'd.
Page 93 - The man resolved and steady to his trust, Inflexible to ill, and obstinately just, May the rude rabble's insolence despise, Their senseless clamours and tumultuous cries ; The tyrant's fierceness he beguiles, And the stern brow, and the harsh voice defies, And with superior greatness smiles.
Page 62 - I have gratified that curiosity by breathing it, drawing it through a glass syphon, and by this means I reduced a large jar full of it to the standard of common air. The feeling of it to my lungs was not sensibly different from that of common air, but I fancied that my breast felt peculiarly light and easy for some time afterwards. Who can tell but that, in time, this pure air may become a fashionable article in luxury ? Hitherto, only two mice and myself have had the privilege of breathing it.
Page 61 - From the greater strength and vivacity of the flame of a candle, in this pure air, it may be conjectured that it might be peculiarly salutary to the lungs in certain morbid cases...
Page 42 - The chamber where the good man meets his fate, Is privileg'd beyond the common walk Of virtuous life, quite in the verge of heaven.
Page 40 - And you, little thing,' speaking to Eliza, ' remember the hymn you learned ; " Birds in their little nests agree," &c. I am going to sleep as well as you : for death is only a good, long, sound sleep in the grave, and we shall meet again.
Page 61 - ... it might not be so proper for us in the usual healthy state of the body : for, as a candle burns out much faster in dephlogisticated than in common air, so we might, as may be said, live out too fast, and the animal powers be too soon exhausted in this pure kind of air. A moralist, at least, may say that the air which Nature has provided for us is as good as we deserve.
Page 39 - We shall all meet finally: we only require different degrees of discipline, suited to our different tempers, to prepare us for final happiness.

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