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B. Obverse.

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B. Reverse.

The rest of the inscription is taken up with the usual imprecatory verses from the Dharmasastras.

C.-Grant of Jayastambha Deva.

The grant is incised on a single plate of copper measuring 10.3′′ by 7.2′′. There is no seal and the place for the seal, a circular projection to the left of the inscription, is vacant; it measures 2.7" by 2.1". The characters are 7.3" in height. The letters are very neatly incised. The language is corrupt Sanskrit. There are altogether twenty-one lines of writing on the plate, of which seventeen are on the obverse and four on the reverse. The record mentions that there was a king named Kulastambha of the Sulki family. His son was Raṇastambha, and Raṇastambha's son was Jayastambha. The genealogy is :Kulastambha

Raṇastambha

Jayastambha

The grant was issued from Kodāloka, which is same as Kodāla of the Talcher grant. Jayastambha is mentioned as a devout worshipper of Śiva. He is styled Maharājādhirāja, the lord offall Gondrars (Gonds), and master of the five great sounds. The inscription records the grant of the village of Chandrapura in the Konkula Khaṇḍa of the Goilla Visaya of the Kodaloka Mandala, to a Brahmana named Vāvana, who belonged to the Sandilya gotra, whose pravaras were Asita and Devala, who was a student of Kauthuma Sakha of the Chandoga Charana, who was the son of Khambho, and the grandson of the Bhaṭṭa Putra Nirvana, who had migrated from Kolāñca. Kolāñca is mentioned in the genealogical works of Bengal as the place from which King Adisūra obtained Brahmanas versed in the Vedas. It has not been met with in Epigraphic records before and its identification is not certain. Various theories have been put forward none of which are trustworthy. The record is not dated either in any era or regnal year. It was incised by the merchant (Vaņika) Isvara.

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