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Dars

Bank Stock. 2571

EACH DAY'S PRICE OF STOCKS IN SEPTEMBER, 1810.

OCKS SperCt3 per Ct. 4 perc't5 perC+5 perCty Long India India Exchequ., South Sea Old New Om- Irish , Imp. Eng. Lott. English 1. Red. Consols. Cons. Navy 1797.

Ann. Stock. Bonds. Bills. Stock. Ann. Aun. nium, 5perCt.3perCt. Tickets. Prizes. 692 68} 854 994

15.2 734

67 687 23

22 15 0 full money. 68

99 85%

18 1 23 pr. (par 2 pr.

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21 pr.

I d 3 pr.

683

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23 a 24pr. par 2 pi.
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24 a 25pr. I a 2 pr.

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Printed by Nichols and Son, Red Lion Passage, Fleet Street, London.]

BRANSCOMB and CO. Stock-Brokers, 11, Holborn, 57, Cornhill, 58, Haymarket, 269, Strand.

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Do lo Days. Mo.

cloudy

70 79 29-16 mostly cloudy
70 80 29-17 morning some rain, mostly clear
66 70
29-16

cloudy, frequent rain
55 64 09-13

morning rain, cloudy' at times
54 65 29-18 some scattered clouds
63 69 29-19

mostly clear
53 66 30. 3 clear
51 65 30- 1 clear

50 65 30-0 clear
10 61 68 29-17 cloudy in general, some light rain
11 55 56 29-16 cloudy, rainy, windy
J2 52 39 29-17

mostly clear 13 49 66 29-19

rather cloudy 52 70 30. 3 1. cloudy, evening some light rain 15 55 60 30- 5 clear 16 53 65 30- 3

cloudy at times, evening some light rain 17 57 68 30- 1 18 58 70 29-19 morning foggy, then clear 19 54 69 29-19 ditto

ditto 30 53 67 30. O

rather cloudy 21 59 66 30. O ditto

ditto in general 92 58 61 29.19 cloudy, heavy rain, thunder and lightning 93 51 59 29-17 cloudy, some rain, thunder, evening clear 94 49 64 29-19 morning cloudy, mostly clear 56 68 30. O

morning hazy, then clear, 57 68 30- 0 clear 27 54 69 29-18 mostly elear 98 59 67 29-18 clear

56 68 29-18 cloudy at times, evening rainy 30 62 71 29-17 morning cloudy, then clear.

The average degrees of Temperature as nuted at 8 o'clock to the morning, are 58 40-100ths; those of the corresponding month in the year 1809, were 56 76-100ths; in 1808, 45 80-100ths; in 1807, 48 27-100ths ; in 1806, 54 52-100ths; in 1805, 58-100ths; and in 1801, 56 32-100ths,

The quantity of Rain fallen this month is equal to 2 inches 66-100ths; that of the corresponding month in the year 1809, was 4 inches 16-100ths ; in 1808, 4 inches 36-100ths; in 1807, 3 inches 69-100ths; in 1806, 1 inch 81-100ths; in 1805, 1 inck 59-100ths; and in 1804, 28-100ths.

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METEOROLOGICAL Table for October 1810. By W. Cary, Strand. Height of Fahrenheit's Thermometer. Height of Fahrenheit's Thermoineter.

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53 68 54 29, 92 fair 38 55 68 56 ,90 fair 29 51 66 6 30,01 fair SO 56 64 57 29,98 fair Oc. 1 / 58

51 30,11 fais 2 53 68 52 24 \fair

50 64 51 28 tair
52 64 52 25 fair
51 64 52

,09 fair
52 61 50 20,91 {fair
7 48 66 55 ,98 foggy

53 65 56 ,94 air 9 54 61 55 ,90 cloudy 10 55 59 54 ,82 cloudy 11 | 52 59 48 ,90 fair

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Oct.
12 47 57 44 29,85 fair
13 40 57 43 30,05 fair
46 56 46

, 20 cloudy
15 46

19 air 16

4256 55 29,84 cloudy
17 57 62 56

155 showers
18 56 64 55 , 45 fair
1950 59 56 ,78 showery
20 56 64 49 68 rain,
2150 59 60 62 Įrain
22 57 61 48

,35 windy
23 4955 44 ,57 fair
24 46 52

83 fair
25 42 50 40 130, 16 fair
26 39 49

35 fair

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THE GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE,

For OCTOBER, 1810.

Mr. URBAN, York, Aug. 13. are but a cambrous deformity, preYORK TORK deservedly ranks as the se judicial to the health of the City,

cond City in England ; yet it is and that more useful edifices might not the mere established title to be so be erected on their sites! So might called, but the association of ideas, the hallowed melancholy of St. Mary's and the impressions which its own Abbey-precincts be invaded; so might features create, that ratify the justice Clifford's Tower be leveled with the of the claim, and would stamp it with dust ; and all that reminds us of the the appellation, even did no legal magnificence of antieut York, remain right exist for it. But, alas! Mr. only in the beautiful delineations of Urban, the ravages of the grand Mr. Halfpenny. It is not for a destroyer are planting the deep fur. Stranger io behold or understand the rows of age on many parts of its springs which move the conduct of venerable countenance ; and I fear those in whom local administration that some of its features are vanishing resides; he can but reason from what away for ever.

he sees, and from the feelings which I have indulged myself with a Ram- those views excite ; but if it be only ble on a portion of the Walls of the tusle, whether good or bad, that is City, formerly more agreeable, when busy on the occasion, he may then more safe, from North-strect Post: he allowed to express his own sentiern, nearly to Skeldergate Postern; ments, and to confess, that he is but I am sorry to say, that there are rather at a loss to conceive bow a interruptions in the course of it, which circumvallation, which in his idea take much from the pleasure of the operates as a barrier against the acwalk, and which, I think, might be cunulation of buildings, can be acreinedied. It is pot to be expected counted not salutary; and he may

be that these decaying fabricks should perinitted to ask, whether, as the now be renewed ; yet I should think, closenes of the streets cannot be unithat the contemplation of the majestic versally remedied, it is pot counterruins might, at no very considerable balanced by the possession of elevaexpence, be rendered easy and secure, tions, commanding the most interestand that the walk along the ramparts ing scenery,and whereon, could we cermuight be maintained, although the tify the roads in order, the inhabitbattlements theniselves should be ants might walk delighted, and enjoy entirely given up to the silent en- the freshness of the reviving breeze. croachments of Time; and, certainly, that some sylphid zephyr would on the interest of the scene would be in its silken pinions, in language soft as no degree diininished, if these moul the wings that bore it, language that dering rempants, and the sombrous could neither irritate nor offend, confeelings of the Antiquary who con- vey the sorrows and regrets of Antitemplates them, should occasionally quity to those who ought to be the be irradiated by the bright beams that guardians, not the destroyers of dart from blushing Beauty's lustrous these antique piles; and could coneyes. But there are surmises afloat, vince them, that, though unseen, unfounded ones I hope, that it is vot the frowning forms of their foreTime alone that burls down the inassy fathers, caparisoned in all their grim fragments; but that more daring attire of war, stalk terrible along the depredation, if not permitted, is at ramparts of their old defences, ascend least overlooked : and notions are their lofty towers, look down with entertained, that the walls themselves mingled anger and concern, and in their hands raise high those forinida- rest and expatiate : I could not with ble weapons, which they are still not the same ardour have accompanied itto permitted to let fall on their forgetful the Castle ; nor with the same emotions sons ; yet those sons might hear their have contemplated those Judges'comsighs, which float hollow on the winds unissioned by His Majesty to dispense that murmur round the battlements, justice, and maintain order in his and their groans, which mix with the provinces; nor with the same lively tempest, and swell the sullen horrors impression have marked the subseof the storm. O that they would quent transmission of those Judges hear them! O that they would be from the Coach of the Sheriff' of The persuaded,' that, although out of County, to the Coach of the Sheriff's London they can only address their of the City; thus evincing, by a Chief Magistrate by the same title, speaking form, the sensibility of Juyet' that the consceuence of their risdiction, and appealing palpably.to City is of a different description to the surrounding multitude ; many of that of the Metropolis; and that, if whom, perhaps, might not be able they would maintain its real reputa- to discuss the nature of their sensation as the second City of the king- tions, but all of whom could feel them dom, they would, as much as pos- to be just, and that something had sible, preserve the vestiges of former been presented to them of an in porttimes, and not suffer its Antiquity to ance beyond the visible perception of be no more.

the ceremony. Nor without this iinTo absolute necessity, London has posing association of ideas could I yielded much of its primæval gran-' have experienced sentiments so subdeur; to absolute necessity, Ouse- limed, when, on the following Sunbridge must also yield. An air of day, I attended in the Temple of the modernised importance will necessa- Lord, in such a Temple! to hear that rily characterise the seat of modern Liturgy accompanied with all its CaEmpire. But this necessity is indige- thedral magnificence, which, whether nous to the Metropolis; it exiends not thus presented to us in choral sublibither: and the air of grandeur which mity, or sanctified by the unadorned proudly tells us This Is York, is the simplicity of the pious Pastor of the grandeur of ages long ago; of times, Village Church, is always interesting, that we are convinced have been, by and can always reach the heart ; but, the substantial memorials which croud in this place, it was grateful to hear upon the sight; yet how well modern the Commandments of Heaven deliimprovement, when judiciously in- vered from the High Altar, as of old troduced, will harinonize with antient by Moses from the Holy Mountain, interest, let the New Walk, that mo- and to listen to the soft melody of dern glory of the City, testify and responsive supplication, floating confirm. York will ever preserve the among the grand enrichments of pride and boast, how justly merited! this amazing edifice, and ascending, of its unequalled Cathedral; but de- we trust, above its walls, to mix prive it of all other remaids of what with the Hyınn of Praise chanted by it has beep, and though it will pos- Cherubim and Seraphim beyond the sess an object which cannot be viewed skies. It was grateful to have the without the highest admiration ; yet fervour of emotion afterwards brought it would then be viewed alonc, and down to earth and earlh's concerns, the assiciation of ideas, perpetually by a judicious, practical, and imrecurring to us wherever we turn our pressive discourse, presenting the eyes in this venerable City, and which grand outlines of a picture, which it so sreally adils to the contemplation was the duty of the mind to fill up; of the minister itself, would then be and delivered with that plainness wanting to complete the plcasidig which was suitable to the place and picture; and for myself I'must ow, the occasion ; and which, in my inind that without thiş unavoidable asso- at least, and if I niay judge from the ciation, I could not have feil the same attention with which it was received, interest in the Procession of the could not, in the opinions of numbers, Judges into. York, a Procession on have been hсighicoed, had it been which, while passing through this attempted to have been set off by the antient City, the mind could amply unappropriaic aid of forensic energy,

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