History of the War in Afghanistan, Volume 2

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R. Bentley, 1851 - Afghan Wars - 690 pages
 

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Page 647 - To force a Sovereign upon a reluctant people, would be as inconsistent with the policy as it is with the principles of the British Government...
Page 280 - A faithless enemy, stained by the foul crime of assassination, has, through a failure of supplies, followed by consummate treachery, been able to overcome a body of British troops, in a country removed, by distance and difficulties of season, from the possibility of succour. But the GovernorGeneral in Council, while he most deeply laments the loss of the brave officers and men, regards this partial reverse only as a new occasion for displaying the stability and vigour of the British power, and the...
Page 256 - We pronounce our decided opinion that for many years to come the restored monarchy will have need of a British force, in order to maintain peace in its own territory and prevent aggression from without. We must add that to attempt to accomplish this by a small force, or by the mere influence of British residents, will, in our opinion, be most unwise and frivolous, and that we prefer the entire abandonment of the country and a frank confession of complete failure...
Page 689 - If you should be enabled by a coup-de-main to get possession of Ghuznee and Cabul, you will act as you see fit, and leave decisive proofs of the power of the British army, without impeaching its humanity. You will bring away from the tomb of Mahmood of...
Page 647 - Content with the limits nature appears to have assigned to its empire, the Government of India will devote all its efforts to the establishment and maintenance of general peace...
Page 344 - ... bayoneted. The enemy's loss during the day must have been severe , the field of battle was strewed with the bodies of men and horses...
Page 647 - The enormous expenditure required for the support of a large force, in a false military position, at a distance from its own frontier and its resources, will no longer arrest every measure for the improvement of the country and of the people.
Page 558 - ... troops into positions wherein they may have easy and certain communication with India; and to this extent the instructions you have received remain unaltered. But the improved position of your army...
Page 650 - Guzerat, I .shall commit this glorious trophy of successful war. " You will, yourselves, with all honour, transmit the gates of sandal-wood through your respective territories to the restored temple of Somnauth. " The Chiefs of Sirhind shall be informed at what time our victorious Army will first deliver the gates of the temple into their guardianship, at the foot of the bridge of the Sutlej.
Page 466 - ... our character as a powerful nation would be entirely lost in this part of the world. It is true that the garrison of Jellalabad has been saved, which it would not have been, had a force not been sent to its relief. But the relief of that garrison is only one object; there still reVOL. II. 2 H main others which we cannot disregard — I allude to the release of the prisoners.