Handbook to government situations: or, The queen's Civil service considered with reference to nomination, mode of appointment and pay

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 205 - Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore, So do our minutes hasten to their end; Each changing place with that which goes before, In sequent toil all forwards do contend.
Page 186 - If two triangles have two sides of the one equal to two sides of the...
Page 21 - MACKENZIE. Studies in Roman Law. With Comparative Views of the Laws of France, England, and Scotland. By Lord MACKENZIE, one of the Judges of the Court of Session in Scotland.
Page 154 - The physical organization of the Bengalee is feeble, even to effeminacy. He lives in a constant vapour bath. His pursuits are sedentary, his limbs delicate, his movements languid. During many ages he has been trampled upon by men of bolder and more hardy breeds.
Page 186 - If a straight line be divided into two equal parts, and also into two unequal parts; the rectangle contained by the unequal parts, together with the square of the line between the points of section, is equal to the square of half the line.
Page 205 - gainst his glory fight, And Time that gave doth now his gift confound. Time doth transfix the flourish set on youth And delves the parallels in beauty's brow, Feeds on the rarities of nature's truth, And nothing stands but for his scythe to mow; And yet to times in hope my verse shall stand, Praising thy worth, despite his cruel hand.
Page 3 - That he is properly certified as free from any physical defect or disease which would be likely to interfere with the proper discharge of his duties ; Third.
Page 17 - No candidate will be allowed any marks in respect of any subject of examination, unless he shall be considered to possess a competent knowledge of that subject.* 7. The Examination will be conducted by means of printed questions and written answers, and by viva voce examination, as may be deemed necessary.
Page 206 - When the Duke of Richmond had spoken, Chatham rose. For some time his voice was inaudible. At length his tones became distinct and his action animated. Here and there his hearers caught a thought or an expression which reminded them of William Pitt. But it was clear that he was not himself. He lost the thread of his discourse, hesitated, repeated the same words several times, and was so confused that in speaking of the Act of Settlement he could not recall the name of the Electress Sophia.
Page 187 - No body can be healthful without exercise, neither natural body nor politic, and certainly to a kingdom or estate a just and honourable war is the true exercise. A civil war indeed is like the heat of a fever ; but a foreign war is like the heat of exercise, and serveth to keep the body in health ; for in a slothful peace both courages will effeminate and manners corrupt.

Bibliographic information