A Visit to Australia and Its Gold Regions

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Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, 1856 - Australia - 202 pages
 

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Page 158 - They consist often of the bark of a single tree, bent in the middle, and placed on its two ends in the ground, affording shelter to only one miserable tenant.
Page 92 - Thus, under the blessing of God, was happily completed, in eight months and one week, a voyage which, before it was undertaken, the mind hardly dared venture to contemplate, and on which it was impossible to reflect without some apprehension as to its termination.
Page 90 - ... guard and the convicts who had been landed in the morning. The spot chosen for this purpose was at the head of the cove, near the run of fresh water, which stole silently along through a very thick wood, the stillness of which had then, for the first time since the creation, been interrupted by the rude sound of the labourer's axe, and the downfall of its ancient inhabitants; a stillness and tranquillity which from that day were to give place to the voice of labour, the confusion of camps and...
Page 93 - Six thousand years ago. The loud wave's roar Were music in these wilds. The wise and good That wont of old, as hermits, to adore The God of Nature in the desert drear, Might sure have found a fit sojourning here.
Page 91 - ... union jack displayed, when the marines fired several vollies; between which the governor and the officers who accompanied him drank the healths of his Majesty and the Royal Family, and success to the new colony.
Page 11 - A traveller has no need of being a botanist, to recognise the torrid zone on the mere aspect of its vegetation ; and without having acquired any notions of astronomy, without any acquaintance with the celestial charts of Flamstead and de la Caille, he feels he is not in Europe, when he sees the immense constellation of the Ship, or the phosphorescent clouds of Magellan, arise on the horizon.
Page 10 - ... the south, opened new constellations to our view. We feel an indescribable sensation when, on approaching the equator, and particularly on passing from one hemisphere to the other, we see those stars, which we have contemplated from our infancy, progressively sink, and finally disappear. Nothing awakens in the traveller a livelier remembrance of the immense distance by which he is separated from his country, than the aspect of an i 5 unknown firmament.
Page 95 - OF chance or change, O let not man complain, Else shall he never never cease to wail : For, from the imperial dome, to where the swain Rears the lone cottage in the silent dale, All feel the assault of fortune's fickle gale...
Page 10 - From the time we entered the torrid zone, we were never wearied with admiring, every night, the beauty of the Southern sky, which, as we advanced towards the south, opened new constellations to our view. We feel an indescribable sensation, when, on approaching the equator, and particularly on passing from one hemisphere to the other, we see those stars, which we have contemplated from our infancy, progressively sink, and finally disappear. Nothing awakens in the...
Page 142 - ... the north is the hot wind, and the south the cold; where the humblest house is fitted up with cedar...

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