Scenes and incidents at sea, a new selection

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Page iv - Tis pleasant, by the cheerful hearth, to hear Of tempests and the dangers of the deep, And pause at times, and feel that we are safe ; Then listen to the perilous tale again, And with an eager and suspended soul, Woo terror to delight us.
Page 156 - ... the chase ; while they, in a manner really not unlike that of the hare, doubled more than once upon their pursuer. But it was soon too plainly to be seen that the strength and confidence of the Flyingfish were fast ebbing.
Page 14 - The crew climbed over the ledge of rocks that flanked their tents, and the sight of a shoal of manatees immediately beneath them, gladdened their hearts. These came in with the flood, and were left in the puddles between the broken rocks of the cove. This supply continued for two or three weeks. The flesh was mere blubber, and quite unfit for food, for not a man could retain it on his stomach; but the liver was excellent, and on this they subsisted. In the meantime, the carpenter with his gang had...
Page iv - ... eager and suspended soul, Woo terror to delight us. ... But to hear The roaring of the raging elements, . . To know all human skill, all human strength, Avail not, . . to look round, and only see The mountain wave incumbent with its weight Of bursting waters o'er the reeling bark...
Page 151 - And the other ran up to him, saying, " Where, where ? " He pointed to a flock of Mother Carey's chickens that had just appeared astern, and began to count how many there were of them. I inquired what was the matter, and the mate replied, " Why, only that we've seen the worst, that's all, master. I've a notion we'll fall in with a sail before twenty hours are past." — "Have you any particular reason for thinking so ? " said I. " To be sure I have," returned he ; " aren't them there birds the spirits...
Page 148 - I felt a strong repugnance at attempting to ascertain it, and rather wished that it might have been some spectre, or the offspring of my perturbed imagination, than a human being. As the sea continued to break over the vessel, I went down to the cabin, after having closely shut the gang-way doors and companion. Total darkness prevailed below. I addressed the captain and all my fellow passengers by name, but received no reply from any of them, though I sometimes fancied I heard moans and quick breathing,...
Page 11 - Blendenhall, who chanced to be upon deck earlier than usual, observed great quantities of sea-weed occasionally floating alongside. This excited some alarm, and a man was immediately sent aloft to keep a good look-out. — The weather was then extremely hazy, though moderate ; the weeds continued ; all were on the alert ; they shortened sail, and the boatswain piped for breakfast. In less than ten minutes, " breakers ahead !" startled every soul, and in a moment all were on deck. — " Breakers starboard...
Page 71 - I presume from the stealthy, timorous manner in which they seem to touch the water, and straightway vanish again. By and by, the true wind, the ripple from which had marked the horizon astern of us, and broken the face of the mirror shining brightly everywhere else, indicated its approach, by fanning out the sky-sails and other flying kites, generally supposed to be superfluous, but which upon such occasions as this do good service, by catching the first breath of air, that seems always to float...
Page 14 - A few were killed, but the flesh was so extremely rank and nauseous that it could not be eaten. The eggs were collected and dressed in all manner of ways, and supplied abundance of food for upwards of three weeks. At the expiration of that period, famine once more seemed inevitable ; the third morning began to dawn upon the unfortunate company after their stock of eggs were exhausted ; they had now been without food for more than forty hours, and were fainting and dejected ; when, as though this...
Page 65 - Enraged at seeing his prey about to escape him, the shark plunged to make a vigorous spring; then issuing from the sea with impetuosity, and darting forward like lightning, with the sharp teeth of his capacious mouth he tore asunder the body of the intrepid and unfortunate boy while suspended in the air.

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