Zoologist: A Monthly Journal of Natural History

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West, Newman, 1904 - English periodicals
 

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Page 185 - In North America the black bear was seen by Hearne swimming for hours with widely open mouth, thus catching, like a whale, insects in the water. Even in so extreme a case as this, if the supply of insects were constant, and if better adapted competitors did not already exist in the country, I can see no difficulty in a race of bears being rendered, by natural selection, more and more aquatic in their structure...
Page 124 - A most remarkable feature in the bite of the tsetse is its perfect harmlessness in man and wild animals, and even calves so long as they continue to suck the cows. We never experienced the slightest injury from them ourselves, personally, although we lived two months in their habitat, which was in this case as sharply defined as in many others, for the south bank of the Chobe was infested by them, and the northern bank, where our cattle were placed, only fifty yards distant, contained not a single...
Page 129 - The central Himalayan rivers often rise in Tibet from lakes full of fish, but have none (at least during the rains) in that rapid part of their course from 10,000 to 14,000...
Page 148 - It is a remarkable fact . . . that a common property has persisted in the bloods of certain groups of animals throughout the ages which have elapsed during their evolution from a common ancestor, and this in spite of differences of food and habits of life.
Page 181 - It is worthy of being recorded, says the Rev. L. Guilding^, " that a noble specimen of the Boa constrictor was lately conveyed to us by the currents, twisted round the trunk of a large sound cedar tree, which had probably been washed out of the bank by the floods of some great South American river, while its huge folds hung on the branches, as it waited for its prey. The monster was fortunately destroyed after killing a few sheep, and his skeleton now hangs before me in my study, putting...
Page 466 - And all the mental attributes of higher animals may be derived from those of lower animals. In other words, the doctrine of evolution is quite as valid in the province of psychology as it is in all the other provinces of organic life. Notwithstanding all the differences presented by animal organisms and the conditions of their existence, the psychic functions of the...
Page 153 - ... which, by a single stroke of his proboscis, might have laid them lifeless in the dust, could not but give rise to the most serious apprehensions. Although crowds be engaged in the chase on...
Page 400 - I. With 18 Photogravures by the AUTHOR; 31 Coloured Plates by the AUTHOR, ARCHIBALD THORBURN and GE LODGE ; and 63 Uncoloured Plates by the AUTHOR and from Photographs. £6 6s.
Page 117 - The laughing hecco, then the counterfeiting jay. The softer with the shrill (some hid among the leaves, Some in the taller trees, some in the lower greaves) Thus sing away the morn, until the mounting...
Page 120 - LEWIS can supply works in all branches of Pure and Applied Science. Catalogues on request. Please state interests. SCIENTIFIC LENDING LIBRARY Annual Subscription from £7.50.

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