Principles of General Grammar: Adapted to the Capacity of Youth, and Proper to Serve as an Introduction to the Study of Languages

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Flagg, Gould and Newman, 1834 - English language - 156 pages

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Contents

I
13
II
61
III
107

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Page 96 - The breezy call of incense-breathing morn, The swallow twittering from the straw-built shed, The cock's shrill clarion, or the echoing horn, No more shall rouse them from their lowly bed.
Page 116 - Silence was pleased: now glowed the firmament With living sapphires; Hesperus that led The starry host rode brightest, till the moon, Rising in clouded majesty, at length Apparent queen unveiled her peerless light, And o'er the dark her silver mantle threw.
Page 96 - On the other side, Satan, alarmed, Collecting all his might, dilated stood, Like Teneriff or Atlas, unremoved : His stature reached the sky, and on his crest Sat Horror plumed ; nor wanted in his grasp What seemed both spear and shield.
Page 114 - Air. A trim reckoning ! — Who hath it ? He that died o' Wednesday. Doth he feel it? No. Doth he hear it? No.
Page 29 - ... with an earnestness which shows how truly he avows that it is incompatible with his own opposite opinion. First, He fails to see clearly the facts — the actual usage — on the ground of which I contend for the relative classification of the term. Quoting from some writer on Grammar, he says — " Proper nouns designate beings in a definite manner, so that there is no need of any sign to point out the particular individuals to which they are applied. Appellative nouns " (relative or absolute)...
Page 29 - ... relative classification of the term. Quoting from some writer on Grammar, he says — " Proper nouns designate beings in a definite manner, so that there is no need of any sign to point out the particular individuals to which they are applied. Appellative nouns " (relative or absolute) " on the contrary, being common to all the individuals of the same species, when we wish to apply them to a single individual, or a certain number of individuals of this species, or lastly, to the whole species,...
Page 109 - THE COUNTRYMAN AND THE RAVEN. A RAVEN, while with glossy breast, Her new laid eggs she fondly press'd, And, on her wicker-work high mounted, Her chickens prematurely counted ; (A fault, philosophers might blame, If quite exempted from the same,) Enjoy'd at ease the genial day...
Page 100 - The first and principal use of the Passive Voice is, to express an action without pointing out the Subject who acts, which we are frequently obliged to do, sometimes because we do not know the Subject who acts, and sometimes because we do not wish to let those whom we address know it.
Page 44 - A relation. j rr ai two things are called the two terms of the relation; the first is called the Antecedent, the second, the Consequent. In these words, " a horse of pasteboard," the two terms of the relation are " horse" and "pasteboard ;" " horse" is the Antecedent, and "pasteboard
Page iii - I have thought it my duty to put within the reach of your youthful capacity, the first principles of General Grammar, in order that they may serve you as a guide in the study of languages, to which you are about to devote the first years of your education.

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