I Have Landed: The End of a Beginning in Natural History

Front Cover
Harmony Books, 2002 - Science - 418 pages
Gould writes about the themes that have defined his career, which his readers have come to expect and celebrate, casting new light upon them and conveying the ideas that science professionals exchange among themselves (minus the technical jargon). Here, of course, is Charles Darwin, from his centrality to any sound scientific education to little-known facts about his life. Gould touches on subjects as far-reaching and disparate as feathered dinosaurs, the scourge of syphilis and the frustration of the man who identified it, and Freud’s 'evolutionary fantasy'. He writes brilliantly of Nabokov’s delicately crafted drawings of butterflies and the true meaning of biological diversity. And in the poignant title essay, he details his grandfather’s journey from Hungary to America, where he arrived on September 11, 1901. It is from his grandfather’s journal entry of that day, stating simply 'I have landed,' that the book’s title was drawn. This landing occurred 100 years to the day before our greatest recent tragedy, also explored, but with optimism, in the concluding section of the book.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - clmerle - LibraryThing

It was with bittersweetness that I read Gould's final collection of Natural History essays. I started with his first, Ever Since Darwin, and read every collection. I learned a great deal about ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - tnilsson - LibraryThing

Gould is one of my favorite authors. I adore his books of essays. This one, however, did not do it for me, perhaps because the essays are more personal to Gould and less generally informative about science and history. Read full review

Contents

Preface
1
Jim Bowies Letter and Bill Buckners Legs
54
Thats Excellent
71
Copyright

9 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2002)

Stephen Jay Gould was one of the most influential evolutionary biologists and most acclaimed science essayists of the 20th century. He died in May 2002. He was the author of numerous books, including The Lying Stones of Marrakech and Questioning the Millennium.

Bibliographic information