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FORTY-SECOND DAY

Among Uncle Jack's mail on the morning of October twelfth was a letter from Ben. Uncle Jack opened the letter with surprise and read:

October 11, 1914. DEAR UNCLE JACK:

You have probably been wondering why we children have been getting home from school too late for your acéustomed afternoon story, and now I can tell you that we have been practicing every day for a Columbus Day program. Belle, May, and I are going to take part in the exercises, and we all hope that you can come to our entertainment in the Assembly Hall of the school, at half-past ten o'clock on the morning of October twelfth. We hope that you will enjoy it as much as we have enjoyed practicing for it. I am enclosing a program of the exercises. Your loving nephew,

BEN.

Uncle Jack was very much pleased to receive this invitation, and quickly unfolded the program.

This is the program of the school exercises:
COLUMBUS DAY PROGRAM

PART ONE

THE COLUMBUS STORY, A PLAY . . FIFTH GRADE

CAST OF CHARACTERS
Columbus

Carter Irvine
Queen Isabella

Sylvia Jones
King Ferdinand

Bobby Orde
First Sailor

Pudgy Kincaid
Second Sailor

Sylvester Jones
Third Sailor

Billy Blue
Fourth Sailor

Johnny English
Fifth Sailor

Rodney Drake
A Page

Morton Drake
A Trumpeter

Fred Fowler
A Flag Bearer
A Guard

Six other boys from
Four Indians)

the Fifth Grade

PART TWO

RECITATION: COLUMBUS ... JOAQUIN MILLER

Belle

RECITATION: THE Boy COLUMBUS

Ben

PART THREE

POSTLUDE: A SPANISH DANCE . . . THIRD GRADE

Led by May and Alice

A few minutes before half-past ten that morning Uncle Jack found a good seat on the middle aisle of the Assembly Hall of the children's school. You are now going to read what he heard and saw at the Columbus Day exercises.

THE COLUMBUS STORY*

SCENE I

Wharf scene sailors sitting on boxes and barrels. An oar, a coiled rope, and other things suggestive of sea life about.

FIRST SAILOR: The last time that I went to Ice

land we were nearly lost in a storm. If we had gone much farther west, I fear we should have come to the edge of the world;

then we surely would have fallen over. SECOND SAILOR: So you still believe that the

earth is flat, do you? I have heard that

some wise men are actually trying to make *From “Colonial Plays for the Schoolroom,” copyright by Educational Publishing Co., and used by their permission.

the people believe that the world is round,

(All laugh.) THIRD Sailor: Now, isn't that ridiculous when

you can see the edge of it right over there? (Points toward horizon.) Why, how could the world be round? If that were true the people on the other side would be walking

with their heads down. (All laugh.) FOURTH SAILOR: To-morrow we go on a trip

down the African coast. We may stop for

some negro slaves before we return. FIFTH SAILOR: Do any of you believe there is

any truth in this scheme of Henry the Navigator's to reach India by sailing around this

Africa? FIRST SAILOR: Why yes, I do, although most

people believe it can't be done. We've got to have a new route to India, and why not an ocean route? The Turks will surely

leave us alone then. SECOND SAILOR: Yes, we must have new routes

to India. 'Tis said that the Turks grow bolder every month now. Every caravan reports some trouble that they have had with the robbers. It grows harder and harder to make up caravan trains. Few men wish

UR

to risk their lives between the Turks and

the desert. THIRD SAILOR: I don't see, though, how Henry

of Portugal expects his schemes to succeed.
Does he not know that there are terrible
monsters in the ocean that would swallow
a ship, and who knows but that in sailing
to the south they will find that dreadful
place where the water boils? Indeed, I

think Henry's plan very dangerous. FOURTH SAILOR: I have been to Iceland and to

Africa also, and yet no terrible monsters have I seen. To-morrow I go to Africa

again and I am not afraid. COLUMBUS: (a barefoot boy, who has been listening

intently to the sailors' stories jumps up and stands before the fourth sailor) O sir! Do you think that your Captain would let me sail with him to-morrow? My father is a wool-comber and we are so poor that I must do something to earn a living. I want to be a

sailor more than anything else in the world. FOURTH SAILOR: (rising) We'll ask the Captain,

my boy. Come down to the dock with me if you are willing to work. A sailor's life is a hard one these days.

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