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OLD ROSIN THE BOW Arr. by GEORGE H. GARTLAN

Old English Song

1. I've trav-eld the wide world o - ver, And now to an 2. Then get you a couple of tomb-stones, That all who pass 3. I feel the grim tyrant approach-ing, That cru - el, im

Ho

oth - er I'll by, as they plac - a - ble

go; go, foe,

I know that good quar - ters are May read in the let - ters you Who spares nei- ther age nor con

wait - ing To wel - come Old Ro - sin the Bow; To put there, The name of Old Ro - sin the Bow; The di - tion, Nore - ven Old Ro - sin the Bow; Nor

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Ros - in
Ros - in
Ros - in

the Bow; I know that good quar - ters are the Bow; May read in the let - ters you the Bow; Who spares nei-ther age nor con

wait - ing Towel - come Old Ros - in the Bow.
put there The name of Old Ros - in the Bow.
di - tion, Note - ven Old Ros - in the Bow.

TO THE PUPIL:

1. Copy and memorize the first stanza of “Mistress Elizabeth.”

2. Use an adjective expressing a motion to describe each of the following: trees

a steamboat an automobile a snake a man

an avalanche 3. Why is the parenthesis used in the first stanza?

TO THE TEACHER:

Test the pupils' knowledge of the stanza.
Exercises 2 and 3 may be oral.
Review, pp. 419–424.

FORTY-FIFTH DAY Thanksgiving Day had come and gone, but still Uncle Jack had not come back.

As a consequence he missed this school play, in which the three children had taken part:

THE FIRST THANKSGIVING*

CHARACTERS

PRUDENCE
FAITH
MAKEPEACE

Do-WELL
PILGRIM Boy
INDIAN

SCENE

A kitchen. Two Pilgrim women working at kitchen table. One is cutting pumpkin for pies, the other mixing pie dough.

IA

PRUDENCE: Who would think that it has been

almost a year since the Mayflower first came

to Plymouth? * From “Colonial Plays for the Schoolroom,” copyright, 1912, by the Educational Publishing Company.

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PREPARING FOR THE FIRST THANKSGIVING FEAST FAITH: Ah yes! and whať a bitter time that was

too. We knew not how we should live

through the winter. PRUDENCE: 'Tis well that the Governor bids us be

thankful for our bountiful harvest this autumn. Methinks a thanksgiving day a most

fitting way by which to show our rejoicing. Faith: Makepeace says that the Indians of Mas

sasoit's tribe are coming to feast with us. Truly, these Indians have taught us many things and we should be glad to have them with us.

PRUDENCE: I well remember the first day that

Samoset walked into our village. How frightened I was! and then when Squanto came and could talk a little English, how glad we were! Without his help, I fear we would not have learned to grow this wonderful Indian corn.

(Enter Makepeace and Do-well, also in Pilgrim costume. They carry guns over their shoulders.)

Faith: What luck, brothers?
MAKEPEACE: Twenty wild turkeys have we killed

for the feast, and Massasoit says that his
Indian hunters will bring venison enough
for all. The Thanksgiving will be a time of

rejoicing and plenty, most surely. Do-WELL: Methinks that we will fare better this

winter with corn and beans in our granaries. I liked not the diet of clams and eels last

winter. PRUDENCE: (sternly) Be not ungrateful, Do-well,

but glad that such food was at hand, else we

surely should have starved. MAKEPEACE: I had a talk with Captain Standish

this morning and he said that the Narragansett Indians are angry with us for favor

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