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THE BLESSING OF PEACE

Is so inestimable in all the departments of life, that we cannot too much prize it. The follow. ing description of it is admirable ; we give it at length.

“ The prophet Isaiah styles our Saviour to be Prince of Peace long before he came into the world, and to answer the title, he made choice to enter into it at a tiine when all the nations were at peace with each other, which was in the days of Augustus; when the temple of Javus was shut, and all the alarms of war were hushed and silenced throughout the world. At his birth the host of heaven descended, and proclaimed peace on earth, as the best state and temper the world could be in to re. ceive and welcome the Author of it. His future conversation and doctrine here upon earth was ever agreeable with his peaceable entrance upon it ; the whole course of his life being one great example of meekness, peace, and pa. tience. At his death it was the only legacy he bequeathed to his followers,

my peace I give unto you !' How far this has taken place, or been actually enjoyed, is not my intention to enlarge upon any further than just to observe, how precious a bequest it was from the many miseries and calamities which have, and ever will ensue from the want of it. If we look into the larger circle of the world, what desolations, dissolutions of government, and invasions of property! What rapine, plunder, and profa. nation of the most sacred rights of mankind, are the certain unhappy effects of it---fields dyed in blood ; the cries of orphans and wi'

pleaded his pardon. It was then made to the eldest son, who, trembling, answered---" Though life is the most valuable of all possessions, yet even that may be purchased too dear. I can. not consent to preserve my existence by taking away him who gave it, nor could I face the world, or even myself, should I be left the only branch of that family I had destroyed !” Love, tenderness, compassion, and all the appendages of honour, must have associated in returning this answer. The proposition was then, of course, made to the younger, John, wlio accepted it with an avidity that seemed to tell the court he would hang half the creation, and even his judges, rather than be a sufferer himself. He performed the fatal work without remorse upon his father and brother, in which he acquitted himself with such dexterity, that he was appointed to the office of hangman, in Derby, and two or three neighbouring counties, and continued it to extreme age. So void of feeling for distress, he rejoiced at a murder, because it brought the prospect of a guinea. Perhaps he was the only man in court who could hear with pleasure a sent nce of death. The bodies of the executed were his perquisite; signs of life have been known to return after execution, in which case he prevented the growing existence by violence ! Loving none, and beloved by none, he spent a life of enmity with man. The very children pelted him in the streets! The mothers endeavored to stop the infant cry with the name of John Crosland, and I have the irksome task of recording him."

Hutton,

dearest interests by falsehood ; the maxims of war applaud it when employed in the destruc. tion of others. That a familiarity with such maxims must tend to harden the heart, as well as to pervert the moral sentiments, is too obvious to need illustration. The natural conse. quence of their prevalence is an unfeeling and unprincipled ambition, with an idolatry of ta. lents, and a contempt of virtue ; whence the esteem of mankind is turned from the humble, the beneficent, and the good, to men who are qualified by a genius fertile in expedients, a courage that is never appalled, and a heart that never pities, to become destroyers of the earth ! While the philanthropist is devising means to mitigate the evils, and augment the happiness of the world, a fellow-worker together with God in exploring, and giving effect to the benevolent ; tendencies of nature, the warrior is revolving, I in the gloomy recesses of his capacious mind, plans of future devastation and ruin---prisons crowded with captives ; cities emptied of their inhabitants ; fields desolate and waste; are among his proudest trophies! The structure of his fame is cemented with tears and blood, and if his name is wafted to the ends of the earth, it is in the shrill cry of suffering humanity, in the curses and imprecations of those whom his sword has reduced to despair ! --Hall.

ASTRONOMY

Is so noble and sublime a science, that every opportunity should be taken of introducing it to the acquaintance of the young and tender mind. The wonderful scenes it unfolds expand the intellectual powers, and lay the basis of a profound devotion towards the Supreme Being.

dows bereft of their best help, too fully instruct Qs! Look into private life ; 'behold how good and pleasant a thing it is to live together in unity ; it is like the precious ointment poured on the head of Aaron that ran down to his skirts!' importing that this balm of life is felt, and en. joyed not only by governors of kingdoms, but is derived down to the lowest ranks of life, and tasted in the most private recesses ; all from the king to the peasant are refreshed with its blessings, without which we can find no com. fort in any thing this world can give. It is this blessing gives every one to sit quietly under his vine, and reap the fruits of his labour and industry. In one word, which bespeaks who is the bestower of it, it is that only which keeps up the harmony and order of the world, and preserves every thing in it from ruin and con. fusion."..Sterne.

THE CURSE OF WAR May be emphatically learnt from the ennmeration of the horrors and miseries with which it is attended; it is one of those' tremendous evils which the Almighty employs to chastise a guilty world.

“ THE morality of peacefnl times is directly opposite to the maxims of war. The funda. mental rule of the first is to do good; of the latter, to inflict injuries. The former commands as to succour the oppressed; the latter to over. whelm the defenceless. The former teaches men to love their enemies, the latter to make themselves terrible even to strangers. The rules of morality will not suffer us to promote the

dearest interests by falsehood ; the maxims of war applaud it when employed in the destruc, tion of others. That a familiarity with such maxims must tend to harden the heart, as well as to pervert the moral sentiments, is too obvious to need illustration. The natural conse. quence of their prevalence is an unfeeling and unprincipled ambition, with an idolatry of ta. lents, and a contempt of virtue ; whence the es. teem of mankind is turned from the humble, the beneficent, and the good, to men who are qualified by a genius fertile in expedients, a courage that is never appalled, and a heart that never pities, to become destroyers of the earth! While the philanthropist is devising means to mitigate the evils, and augment the happiness of the world, a fellow-worker together with God in exploring, and giving effect to the benevolent tendencies of nature, the warrior is revolving, in the gloomy recesses of his capacious mind, plans of future devastation and ruin---prisons crowded with captives ; cities emptied of their inhabitants ; fields desolate and waste; are among his proudest trophies! The structure of his fame is cemented with tears and blood, and if his name is wafted to the ends of the earth, it is in the shrill cry of suffering humanity, in the curses and imprecations of those whom his sword has reduced to despair ! --Hall.

ASTRONOMY

Is so noble and sublime a science, that every opportunity should be taken of introducing it to the acquaintance of the young and tender mind. The wonderful scenes it unfolds expand the intellectual powers, and lay the basis of a profound devotion towards the Supreme Being.

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