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case with Milton and Shakespeare. Hence John. son's delineation of Shakespeare's talents in the following lines, turns on this point, and is con. fessed to be the most striking lines produced by that great Biographer..--

When Learning's triumph o'er her barb'rous foes
First reard the stage, immortal Shakespeare rose ;
Each change of mans-colour'd life he drew,
Exhausted worlds, and then imagin'd new :
Existence saw him spurn her bounded reign,
And panting Time toil'd after him in vain;
His powerful strokes presiding Truth confest,
And unresisted Passion storm'd the breast !

Let any

Milton also deals much in the sublime, and the most energetic parts of his poem are those where he expatiates in the regions of fancy. Even his devils are grand, and command a certain awful admiration. person take up Paradise Lost, and peruse the first books of that immortal work, he will feel the truth of these remarks. Genius in its bigh. est sense is this productive power, for it generates beauties of an exalted kind. Its corus. cations Aash upon the reader. We are amazed and confounded at its exertions. In this high class indeed few writers can be ranked. It requires extraordinary talents, such as seldom meet in more than one man in the course of a century:

But 'Genius must not be confined to these superior efforts. It has its degrees, like every thing else, in the wise economy of nature. We talk of a genius for poetry--for war--for politics, or for any mechanical employment. The word possesses an extensive signification, and may therefore be applied to almost every thing."

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writer for youth has little more to do than the Pioneer--hechalks out the path, perhaps, overgrown with thorns and brambles, and leads plain, simple, unsuspecting youth, in the road which terminates in present and future felicity.

Genius is that divine power of the mind to which mankind have in all ages, and in all nations, rendered their willing homage. Under whatever character it makes its appearance, it excites attention. We gaze at its creative energies, and contemplate its effusions with a more than ordinary delight. This is a fact so well established, that by no one will it be se. riously questioned.

But a reflecting mind will pause and ask itself, what is that power of the intellect which thus challenges universal admiration ? The question is important, and worthy of enquiry. Let us examine it.

Many definitions of Genias have been of. fered to the public, and have received discus sion. Perhaps the most unexceptionable is the following :---Genius is that power of the human mind by which literary beauties are generated. This definition is not given merely as the wri. ter's own private opinion, but rather as the result of the different accounts which have been communicated in various publications.

To confirm the justice of the definition, I will not revert to the origin of the terın, which is in my favour. Its etymology is clearly indica. tive of its creative energy. But let us refer to what are termed works of Genius. What are these, but generally speaking, works of imagi. nation ? The writer, spurning the narrow boundaries of time and space, launches forth into themes which excite admiration, and over. wbelm us with astonishment. This was the

case with Milton and Shakespeare. Hence John. son's delineation of Shakespeare's talents in the following lines, turns on this point, and is con. fessed to be the most striking lines produced by that great Biographer.....

When Learning's triumph o'er her barb'rous foes
First reard the stage, immortal Shakespeare rose ;
Each change of many-colour'd life he drew,
Exhausted worlds, and then imagin'd new :
Existence saw him spurn her bounded reign,
And panting Time toil'd after him in vain;
His powerful strokes presiding Truth confest,
And unresisted Passion storm'd the breast !

Let any

Milton also deals much in the sublime, and the most energetic parts of his poem are those where he expatiates in the regions of fancy. Even his devils are grand, and command a certain awful admiration. person take up Paradise Lost, and peruse the first books of that immortal work, he will feel the truth of these remarks. Genius in its highest sense is this productive power, for it generates beauties of an exalted kind. Its corus. cations Aash upon the reader. We are amazed and confounded at its exertions. In this high class indeed few writers can be ranked. It requires extraordinary talents, such as seldom meet in more than one man in the course of a century:

But Genius must not be confined to these superior efforts. It has its degrees, like every thing else, in the wise economy of nature. We talk of a genius for poetry--for war--for politics, or for any mechanical employment. The word possesses an extensive signification, and may therefore be applied to almost every thing.

We however remark, that Genius is necessary to distinguish a man, whatever line of life he follows, provided it has a connection with the operations of the intellect. In the learned world we frequently meet with productions that have something of this divine power to recommend them. Poor, indeed, must be the performance which is wholly destitute of it : In the Adventurer, written by Dr. Hawkes. worth, will be found an entertaining paper, where the works of men of genius are tried by a fiery ordeal, and serious consequences ensued. Many parts of these celebrated writers became expunged, those portions of them which were deemed unworthy of their talents, no lon. ger remained. Every thing which might be denominated unjust, obscene, trifling, was ba. nished. The efforts of intellect were purified from their dross. Thus remarks its ingenions author" It gave me the highest satisfaction to see Philosophy thus cleared from erroneous principles, History purged of falsehood, Poetry of fustian, and nothing left in each but Genius, Sense, and Truth !”

Let not men, however, of ordinary genius, throw their pens aside, and abandon themselves tu despair. There is a class of readers who may be pleased with their productions. For taste, as well as genius, exists in endless varieties. At the same time every one should exert himself for the improvement of those ta. lents with which heaven has endowed him.-Genius, though not to be conferred by any human being, yet may be enlarged and invigo. rated. There are instances, on record, where the slenderest sparks have been blown up into a Aame. There is indeed scarcely any faculty more capable of improvement. Hence the

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