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numerable stars; the moon, rising in clouded majesty, unveils her peerless light ; whilst the silent solemnity of the scene Alls the mind with sentiments and ideas beyond the power of language to express.

Variety is the source of every pleasure ; and the bountiful Author of nature, in the magni. ficent display of his wisdom and power, has afforded us every possible means of entertain. ment and instruction. What a pleasing succes. sion of scenes results from the gradual vicissi. tudes of the seasons! Summer, Winter, Spring, and Autumn, lead us insensibly through the varied circle of the year; and are no less pleasing to the mind, than necessary towards bringing to maturity the various productions of the earth. Whether the sun faines in the solstice, or pours his mild effulgence from the equator, we equally rejoice in his presence, and adore the omniscient Being, who gave him his appointed course, and prescribed the bounds which he can never pass !"... Bonnycastle.

ANIMAL AND VEGETABLE CREATION, Is replete with wonders...its variety is im. mense---its treasures are inexhaustible.

“THE Earth is covered with vegetables and animals, the entire vocabulary of which no scholar, no academy, no one nation has ever been able perfectly to acquire. An intelligent naturalist, at Paris, some years ago announced, that he was in possession of more than thirty thousand distinct species of animals, while his herbals contained only eighteen thousand spe. cies of plants. This number of animals, how. ever, so superior to that of vegetables, is a

mere nothing, in comparison with what exists on the globe.

When we recollect that every species of plant is a point of union for different genera of insects, and that there is not perhaps a single one but which has peculiar to itself a species of fly, butterfly, gnat, beetle, lady-bird, snail, and the like; that these insects serve for food to other species, and these too exceedingly numerous, such as the spider, the dragon-fly, the ant, the formica-leo : and to the immense families of small birds, of which many classes, such as the wood-pecker and the swallow, have no otber kind of nourishment; that these birds are in their turn devoured by birds of prey, such as kites, falcons, buzzards, rooks, crows, hawks, vultures, and others ; that the general spoil of these animals, swept off by the rains into the rivers, and thence to the sea, becomes the aliment of almost innumerable tribes of fishes, to the greatest part of which the naturalists of Europe have not hitherto given a name ; that numberless legions of river and sea fowls prey upon these fishes---We shall have good ground for believing, that every species of the vegetable kingdoin serves as a basis to many species of the animal kingdom which multiply around it as the rays of a circle round its centre.

I have not included in this superficial representation, either qnadrupeds, with which all the intervals of magnitude are filled, from the mouse which lives under the grass, to the ca. melopard, who can feed on the foliage of trees at the height of fifteen feet; or the amphibious tribes; or the birds of night;, or reptiles or polypuses, of which we have a knowledge so slender; or sea insects, some families of which,

such as the crab-fish, shrimp, and the like, would be alone sufficient to fill the greatest ca. binets.

I have made no mention of insects of many kinds; neither have I taken into any account that infinite number of living things, visible and invisible, known and unknown, which have no fixed determination, and which nature has scattered about, through the air, over the earth, and along the depths of the ocean!”

St. Pierre.

SOCIAL WORSHIP, Is attended with a thousand advantages ; it softens our nature, refines our affections, and improves the heart.

“ONE class of religious duties separately considered tends to depress the mind, filling it with ingenuous shame and wholesome sorrow; and to these humiliating feelings solitude might perhaps be found congenial: but the sentiments of admiration, love, and joy, swell the bosom with emotions which seek for fellowship and communi tio The flame, indeed, may be kindled by silent musing; but when kindled it must infallibly spread. The devout heart, penetrated with large and affecting views of the immensity of the works of God, the harmony of his laws, and the extent of his beneficence, bursts into loud and vocal expressions of praise and adoration; and, from a full and overflow. ing sensibility, seeks to expand itself to the ut. termost limits of creation. The mind is forçi. bly carried out of itself, and embracing the whole circle of animated existence, calls on all above, around, below, to help to bear the bur.

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numerable stars; the moon, rising in clouded majesty, unveils her peerless light ; whilst the silent solemnity of the scene Alls the mind with sentiments and ideas beyond the power of language to express.

Variety is the source of every pleasure ; and the bountiful Author of nature, in the magni. ficent display of his wisdom and power, has afforded us every possible means of entertain. ment and instruction. What a pleasing succes. sion of scenes results from the gradual vicissi. tudes of the seasons! Suminer, Winter, Spring, and Autumn, lead us insensibly through the varied circle of the year; and are no less pleasing to the mind, than necessary towards bringing to maturity the various productions of the earth. Whether the sun Aames in the solstice, or pours his mild effulgence from the equator, we equally rejoice in his presence, and adore the omniscient Being, who gave him his appointed course, and prescribed the bounds which he can never pass !"...Bonnycastle.

ANIMAL AND VEGETABLE CREATION, Is replete with wonders...its variety is im. mense..its treasures are inexhaustible.

“THE Earth is covered with vegetables and animals, the entire vocabulary of which no scholar, no academy, no one nation has ever been able perfectly to acquire. An intelligent naturalist, at Paris, some years ago announced, that he was in possession of more than thirty thousand distinct species of animals, while his herbals contained only eighteen thousand spe. cies of plants. This number of animals, how. ever, so superior to that of vegetables, is a

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