Handbook of Hope: Theory, Measures, and Applications

Front Cover
C. Richard Snyder
Academic Press, Jun 7, 2000 - Psychology - 440 pages
Hope has previously been a construct more of interest to philosophy and religion than in psychology. New research has shown, however, that hope is closely related to optimism, feelings of control, and motivation toward achieving one's goals. The Handbook of Hope presents a comprehensive overview of the psychological inquiry into hope, including its measurement, its development in children, how its loss is associated with specific clinical disorders, and therapeutic approaches that can help instill hope in those who have lost theirs. A final section discusses hope in occupational applications: how the use of hope can make one a better coach, teacher, or parent.
  • Defines hope as a construct and describes development of hope through the lifespan
  • Provides multiple instruments for measuring hope
  • Guides professionals in how to assess hope levels & implement hope as part of therapy
  • Relates hope to all portions of the population
  • Includes case studies, figures, and tables to aid understanding of research findings and concepts; discusses the importance of hope to relationships, achieving goals, and success at work
 

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User Review  - DaveShearon - LibraryThing

This is a handbook for practitioners versed in the research behind hope. It includes sections on the fundamentals of Dr. Snyder's Hope Theory, how hope develops and can wane, measuring hope, and ... Read full review

Contents

Developing and Deteriorating
23
Measuring
55
TheoryBased Applications
87
Applications to Specific People
183
Societal Implications
387
Author Index
413
Subject Index
431
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About the author (2000)

C.R. Snyder is a fellow of the APA in the divisions of teaching, social and personality, clinical, and health. He has been the director of the Clinical Psychology Program at the University of Kansas since 1975. Since 1987 he has been the editor of the Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology.

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