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AE
POETICAL WORKS

OF

GEOFF. CHAUCER.

IN FOURTEEN VOLUMES.
THE MISCELLANEOUS PIECES

From Urry's Edition 1721,
THE CANTERBURY TALES

From Tyrwhitt's Edition 1775.

Grete well CHAUCER whan yemetcars
Of ditees and of fonges glade,
The which he---made,
The londe fulfilled is over all.

GOWER.
My maifterCHAUCER.--chiefe pretenf Bretayne----
Whom all this londe schulde of ryght preferre,
Sith of our langage he was the lode-terre----
That made first to dy ftylle and rayne
The gold dewe dropys of fpechc and eloquence
Into our tunge thrugh his excellence.

LYDGATE.
The honour of English tong is dede----
My mayfier CHAUCER, floure of cloquence,
Mirrour of fructuous entendement,
Universel fadirin science...
This londis verray trefour and richefTe....
The firfte fynder of our fayre langage.

OCCLEVE.
Venerabili CHAUCER, principall poete but pere,
Hevinly trumpet, orlege and regulere,
In eloquence balme, condict and diali,
Mylky fountane, clere ftrand, and rois riall,
Of fresche endite throw Albiouniland hraid. DOUGLAS.

O reverend CHAUCER! role of rethouris all,
As in oure toung flourimperial
That raise in Brittane evir,quha reidis right
Thou beiris of Makers the triumphs royall,
The fresche enamiltterines celestiall:
This mater couth haif illuminit full bricht,
Was thou nocht, of our Inglis all the light,
Surrounting every toung terreftriall
As far as Mayi's morrow dois midnight.

DUNBAR.

VOL. XIII.

EDINBURG:
AT THE Apollo Prals, BY THE MARTINS.

Anno 1782.

THE

POETICAL WORKS

OF

GEOFFREY CHAUCER.

VOL. XIII.

CONTAINING HIS

MISCELLANEOUS PIECES, viz.

BOKE OF FAME. IN THREE || TOGETHER WITH TESTIMO. BOKES,

NIESOF LEARNED MEN CON. BALADES,

CERNING CHAUCER AND HIS WORDES TO A. SCRIVENERE, WORKS,

&c. &c. &c.

But natheles certain
I can right now no thrifty Tale fain,
But CHAUCER, (though he can but lewedly
On metres and on riming craftily)
Hath sayd hem in swiche English as he can
Of olde time, as knoweth many a man;
And if he have not sayd hem, leve brother,
In o book, he bath fayd hem in another.---
Who fo that wol his large Volume sekc. TALES, ver. 4465

Dan CHAUCER, well of English undefil'd,
On Fame's eternal bead-roll worthy to be fil'd...
010 Dan Geffrey, in whose gentle fpright
The pure well-head of poetry did dwell....
He whilft he lived was the foveraigne head
Of thepherds all-------

SPENSER,
Old CHAUCER, like the morning star,
Tous discovers day from far;
His light those mifts and clouds diffolv'd
Which our dark nation long involv'd;
But he descending to the shades
Darkness again the age invades.

DENHAM.
CHAUCER, him who firtt with harmony inform'd
Thelanguage of our fathers---His legends blithe
He sang of love or knighthood, or the wiles
Of homely life, thro' each eftate and age
The fashions and the follies of the world
With cunning hand portraying-----
Him who in times----
Dark and untaught began with charming verse
To tame the rudeness of his native land.

AKENSIDE.

EDINBURG:
AT THE Apollo Press, BY THE MARTINS.

Anno 1782.

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THE HOUSE OF FAME.

IN THREE BOKES.

In this book is foewed bow the deeds of all men and women,

be they good or bad, are carry'd by report to pofterity..

THE PROLOGUE.

5

10

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God tourne us everie dreme to gode,
For it is wondir thyng by the’rode,
To my witte, what caufith swevines
On the morowe or on evines,
And why the'effe&te foloweth of fome,
And of some it shall nevir come,
Why that is an avision,
And this a revelacion,
Why this a dreme, why that a sweven,
And not to every man liche even,
Why this a fantome, why that oracles,
I n'ot; but whoso of these miracles
The causis knowith bet than I
Define he, for I certainly
Ne can'hem not, ne nevir thinke
To busie my witte for to swinke
To knowe of ther significacions,
The gendris, ne the distinccions
Of the cymes of 'hem, ne the causis,
Or why that this is more then that is,

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