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And many a time, in my nightly slumbers,

Bearing a glove as a lady's I held the lists against countless numbers,

After the style of the middle.....

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I am changed at present; the olden fever

Has left my brain in a sounder state ; In common-place I'm a firm believer,

And hunt for figure and fact and date. I have lost a lot of my old affection,

For books on which I was wont to But still I can thrill at the recollection

Of mystery, magic, and martial

ROMANTIC RECOLLECTIONS.

BY A MUSICAL CARD.

I.

When I lay in a cradle and sucked a coral,

I loved romance in my childish way; And stories with or without a moral

Were welcome as ever the flow'rs in May.
For love of the false I learnt my spelling,

And braved the perils of
While matters of fact were most repelling,

Romance was p leasant as aught could......

SPORTING INTELLIGENCE.

Nicholas AT THE GREAT EXHIBITION.

THE ORIENTAL RepositoRY (LIMITED), HORSELAYDOWN. My Dear Young FRIEND, — Your kindly note, ordering of me for to describe my visit to the gay capital of our lively neighbours, and to do it if possible like the French style more than in my usual way, such being a method of composition which requires a good deal of space, it have come safe to hand; but you have been grossly misinformed, Sir, or you would never go so far as to say as the Old Man have been leading an abandoned life and made himself notorious at half the drinking-shops of Paris, there being a good deal of exaggeration in the reports concerning of my conduct. Gay I may have been, having your own instructions to that effect in writing, deny it, my dear young friend, if your conscience will allow you; but with the exception of a fling or two, owing to the light wines, Nicholas being used to a more trustworthy description of liquor, and freely confessing that I went about "seeing life” like any other fine old English gentleman, all the rest is but the turpid calumnies of them which grudges me my situation,

On one point, my dear young friend, it is impossible for the Prophet to be too explicit. There is no truth in the report that Nicholas have been photographed along of Menken, she never having offered the Old Man anything for to do so. Please contradict the rumour amongst the aristocracy. And so here goes for what they call a "fooleytone."

MONSIEUR LE REDACTEUR:-Such larks !

Up all night, a-drinking of claret wine along of the Britannic exhibitors, than whom a more affectuous nor yet a more respectuous corps, though a little gay, but youth will be served.

Toujours gai, ba! ha! ha!

Bu qui s'avance; not as your Prophet quite knows why the words should keep on a-ringing in his head, and a-singing in his ears, except perhaps his having sat up all night with a sick friend than whom no one more fond of cheerful music and a social glass.

Régumons.

The Exhibition—it is the triumph of civilization, Napoleonic and august.

So it says in the French papers, which they do not give you much for the money, and the Sporting Intelligence, my dear young friendI mean MONSIEUR LE REDACTEUR—it ain't fit for the lowest capacity.

Bu qui s'avance.

Ah, hospitality sympathetic of the old Gaulish nation! No sooner had the musicians of Paris heard of your Old Man's arrival, than they proposed to give a special performance in his honour, and out of compliment suggested "Le Prophete.”.

NICHOLAS, however, do not like these public ovations, he having his own reasons for keeping just a little in the background for a while.

Bu qui s'avance. Accept, Monsieur my dear young Redactorial Friend, the assurance of my most distinguished consideration,

NICHOLAS. (Suite next week.) P. S.-If it is all to be done in these here jerking sort of sentences, you and me must come to some new agreement with regard to the honoraryrium, as we say in the classics.

A Deputation. The papers, under the heading "a gorilla hunt,” state that three gigantic specimens of the species made their escape the other day from a caravan at Belper. The account goes on to state that “after consulting together on the top of the caravan they all set out for Derby." The noble Earl no doubt received the deputation with his usual urbanity, but, as yet, no account of what transpired at the meeting has appeared in those organs, which would of course be supplied with the monkeys.

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A (N) AG-GRAVATING PROPOSAL.

SCENE.Hampstead Heath on Sunday morning. Cad (to Curate on his way to his duty) :-"Now's YER CHANCE, SIR. HERE'S THB '088 AB'LL TAKE YER ALL ROUND THE 'EATH IN A CANTER BEFORE CHURCH TIME!

DOUBLE ACROSTIC.

No. 15. Go and visit Trafalgar-square Say whose works are the finest there; Praise each artist, and still confess, This is the painter to paint a dress : Be it velvet or satin sheen, Clothing a child or mighty queen, Never a limner, all men know, Skill like his at a dress can show.

6.
To hit it you can never fail,
A simple third note in the scale.

7. Supposing a pretty girl asked for a kiss, I'll wager your answer would surely mean this.

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1.
A city where the sunlight smiles
On leagues of long canals, and tiles.

2.
Well has SHELLEY told the awful story

Of a father's guilt, a daughter's woe;
When a great crime won immortal glory
For a lovely maiden long ago.

3. You hear it when you pace the village street, When summer eventides are fresh and sweet, Still loud resounding with the blows, the theme Once of a great musician's tuneful dream.

4. The artist may have done his work with skill, And yet our wood-block needs a something still Before it meets the public's eager eye, And that this man can best of all supply.

5. There's something wrong and so you look For these at one end of the book.

ANSWER TO AGROSTIO No. 13.
C Caw

W
R Rienzi

I
I Idiotic
C Cork
K Kettle
E Elephant T

T Thames
CORRECT SOLUTIONS OF ACROSTIC No. 13, RECEIVED JUNE 12:–M. C. P., Truro;
F. W.; Blind Cat; Benhill; Three Furies; Ah, that Rascal; F. and P.; Gyp;
Spodger; Middle Stump; H. McP.; Acute; N. L. R.; Kiss Polly Twice; J. B. D. W.;
Sandy Shin; T. B.; Nikns, etc.; D. N. 0. B.; G. W. M. H.; Entrave; J. S.;
0. and Sons ; Covent Garden; W.D., Jockey Club; Tzatleca; Lechuga; P. L.A.T.;
Hat and Jin; Jumper; Fides; Vampyre; W. H.; Jock; Mountain Heath; Kate
V.; BRLKK.; A Voice from Bradbourne; A Gowk; Nem; M. T.; Bumplepuppy;
The Old Man ; Pater; S. S.N.; Anser; W.F., Croydon ; Ginger; Bob de Vichy;
H. B. P.; Hartow Weald; Dio dell'or; Miles ; 'R. S.; Quartette; Clara B.;
Portobello; Constance; Old Trafford ; Nobs; Rhoda; Shorncliffe; Ruby; L. A. K.
Never No More ; Brick Court; Snooks; South Side ; Trissie ; Warming Pan;
Penalverne; W. B.; Caterham; Breakside and Hamish ; Mike; Liverpool; Icks;
F. A. B.; Jib Jobbey; Three Glasgow Bodies; Mammy Muff; Rose S.; C. M.;
Knurr and Spell; Four Boobies; Thomas à T.; Two Marine Dealers; D. E. H.;
Wisbechensis; Corporal Chalks; 0. K., Brighton; Mem Jay; Regento; F. W.;
Leo Minor; Ísatlee; Correct Kyard; H. B. c.; Tootle Three; Myrtle; J. H.
and A. L. S.; Tommy; A. H. Y.; He Who Is; E. G. C.; Bow Wow; A Gowk;
D. C. L.; Snip; B. W. S. H.; Ormskirk; Xarifa; F.J. G. W.; Cerevino.

PARLIAMENTARY.—There is no truth in the report that MR. DISRAELI is about to be raised to the peerage under the title of Baron De Veer!

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display, which was evidently written for publication on Whit Monday, but was deferred till the Tuesday. It contained a passing reference to OLMAR, of whom, apparently, by a change of tenses, necessitated by the standing-over of the article, it was made to speak as if he had appeared, whereas his performance was put off, like the article, till a later date. Thereupon our old and revered friend the Pall Mall Gazette waxes moral, and says, “It is dangerous to write reviews of notices of public performances without sceing them, on the simple faith of advertisements or programmes." Quite so. And nobody ought to be more aware of the danger than the Pall Mall, for to add to its previous blunders, whose name is Legion, it, a few days ago, reported a public festival,"with Mr. CHARLER DICKENS in the chair,' whereas that gentleman was not near the spot. But to trifle with a bishop is even a more serious matter than to take liberties with an author; and the P. M. G., on a recent occasion, gave a report of the installation of certain bishops at Canterbury Cathedral. It was hardly possible that it could have received even a telegraphic report of the ceremony in time for the same day's edition, but it nevertheless gave its readers an account, mentioning three bishops, and then next day coolly corrected the bungle, by stating that "its Canterbury Correspondent” had fallen into an error, and that, in fact, only two bishops were present, the third had been kept away by illness, or some such circumstance. Yes—it is dangerous to write reviews of public per

formances without seeing them ! WM

Some time since, in discussing the mismanagement of the pension-list, I drew attention to a paragraph in a Perth paper which stated that a retired military officer residing near the Bridge of Allan had received a literary pension with but slender claims to it. I questioned the statement at the time, and I have since learnt that the paragraph was incorrect—the pension was given for “distinguished service," as the local journal should have known; there is no excuse for a provincial paper's mis-statement of facts which it has the means of investigating, and the Perth print would do well to be more scrupulous.

SCHOOLMASTERS are not at first sight the sort of people we should consider to be allied to the poets, but they belong to the genus irritabile, notwithstanding. There has been a pretty little stir at Hanwell, got up by a local pedagogue, who wishes to change the name of the little village because the 'bus-cads chaff him when he desires to ride in the direction of the lunatic asylum. A public meeting was held, and the inhabitants present decided that they preferred to be called inhabitants of Hanwell rather than Bishopstown, and quite right too! It is an

honour and not a discredit to a place to bear the same name as an DOWN ON HIM, AND UP TO HIM I institution founded and supported for the care and cure of one of the

saddest of all human afflictions. Sensible folks are not made miserable A Fact. SCENE.—Ludgate Station.

by the stale wit of 'bus-cads--besides, some people may give Hanwell Railway Oficial (to Rustic) :-"KING's Cross P UPSTAIRS, SIR!" as their address without the least chance of being suspected of residing

Rustic (who has been warned of the wicked ways of London) :-“Nay, at the asylum; to become qualified for a mad-house, one must at some
NAY; THEE DOESN'T KOTCH I LIKE THAT! I BEAN'T GOIN' Oopstairs time or other have had a reason to lose !
TO THE Oonderground RAILWAY."

“What is the Broadway ?" is a question which the papers have been putting to us lately. Well, it is a new magazine to be published

by MESSRS. ROUTLEDGE, who stand with one foot in Broadway, LudTown Talk.

gate-hill, and the other in Broadway, New York, like an Atlantic

Colossus. The wrapper is one of the best I've seen since the Cornhill, BY THE SAUNTERER IN SOCIETY.

and the list of authors' names the strongest ever published, for it includes most of the American as well as of the English writers of note. The

line it is to take is sufficiently foreshadowed by this :-it will be essenHERE is to be a concert at the Crystal tially international, and will, I hope, strengthen our fraternal relations

Palace shortly in aid of the fund for with Brother Jonathan. There is room and a career for so novel a
repairing the damage done by the project, even though we have so many magazines already.
fire last autumn. It is fixed for the I have mentioned lately that whatever may be its drawbacks in the
26th inst., and there will be a gather-financial sense, the London, Chatham, and Dover line is unrivalled in
ing of musical stars, including, I its treatment of the public. From recent experience, I'm sorry to find
believe, the harmonious comet, whose I can't say as much for the London and Brighton. It happens to have
eccentric orbit is shortly to give a good many branches, and is therefore a confusing line to those who
employment to the gentlemen of the do not ordinarily travel by it, but the porters, with scarcely an ex-
long robe, as our friend the penny-a-ception, are utterly incapable of giving one any information that can
liner puts it. I sincerely hope that be relied upon, and to judge from a case that came under my notice,
the public will come forward hand- the station masters contrast most unfavourably with those of the
somely and support the concert. It L., C., and D. R. on the score of civility. At by-stations, tickets are
is not often that the public has the not issued until about a minute before the train arrives, and in the
opportunity of doing a beneficent consequent hurry, mistakes and overcharges (I have not heard of
action, and getting the full value of undercharges) arise, and are not likely to be discovered until too late.
its money at the same time, as it will As for the changes, and the number of trains going in different direc-
do in this case. The Palace is full of tions, heaven help the unprotected female at-East Croydon let us say
sights and curiosities, the programme for example, bound for Three Bridges! A thought occurs to me of
is varied and extensive, and the which I will give the benefit to the L., C., and D. R.--the funds of
grounds look lovely. But one cannot the company might be honourably augmented if its employés were set
help missing the Tropical Depart- to give lessons in intelligence and civility to those lines that may happen
ment, and feeling that the People's to need them. Certainly the L., B., and S. C. might advantageously
Palace is shorn of some of its glory. lay out the proverbial "twopence."

So the sooner we put our shoulders to the wheel and push forward the rebuilding the better for all of us. Apropos of the entertainments at Sydenham, and specially of the last RACING INTELLIGENCE. We shall, in all probability, shortly publish grand firework display, there was a notice in the Telegraph of that some "stable notes" from Our Roan Correspondent.

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