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(This was one of the Cambridge Prize Epigrams for 1824.)

TRANSLATION OF THE FOREGOING.

Both the wise and the witless scribble ;
But the wight, whom here we bury,

By the grace of the skies

Must have been very wise,
Or very foolish,--very !

He never wrote a stanza:
Small weight will Charon find him;

The only Ghost

Who comes to the coast,
And brings no harp behind him!

NUGÆ SERIA DUCUNT IN MALA.

Odit Charinus serias senum barbas,
Totusque nugis illaborat urbanis.
Nugus amicus, tota territat nutu
Critico theatra, fit gravis cothurnorum
Fidiumque censor, laudat auream Ledæ
Vocem, pedesque mobiles Tigellini,
Et seminudam Thaidos venustatem.
Nugis amicus, scit leves puellarum
Captare risus, ore vota mellito
Garrire callet, seu Neæra seu Phyllis
Telo medullas læserit venenato.
Nugis amicus, per beata Parnassi
Errat vireta, floridas Camenarum
Legit corollas, aureum quatit plectrum,
Permessioque labra proluit rivo.
Quid inde fiet ?—his senescit in nugis,
Veneris facetus servus,--et columnarum;
Inutilisque canet, esurit, torpet,
Nimis jocosus, seriusque nugator.

(This was one of the Cambridge Prize Epigrams for 1822.) TRIFLES END IN SERIOUS EVILS.

TRANSLATION OF THE FOREGOING.

With all a fashionable’s rage
Charinus loathes the beard of age;
A trifler all, he loves to sit
The very sovereign of the Pit,
To terrify the Tragic Muse
He talks about the dancers' shoes,
And raves of Vestris' eyes of jet
And Mercandotti's pirouette;
A trifler all, he studies bows,
Makes earnest love in whispered vows,
And talks about the shafts that fly
From Phillis' or Neæra's eye;
A trifler all, he kills an hour
In wandering through Thalia's bower,
Shakes his wild harp with frantic mien,
And gets dead drunk with Hippocrene;
And so becomes an ancient Beau,
The slave of Venus, and the Row;
And prates, and puns, and stares away,
And stupefies from day to day;
Till Death cuts short the quibbling knave,
And sinks the merry-in the Grave !
VOL. II.-15

II.

NugaroR merus, at nec inficetus,
Tuas, et Veneris, fero catenas.
Nugas mille dabo, dabo libenter,
Gemmas, pallia, Chia vina, pisces,
Pæsti florea serta, serta Pindi.
Nugas mille loquor, loquor disertus,
Preces, blanditias, jocos, amores,
Quotquot sint, Veneres Cupidinesque.
Tu nugas mihi mille conferenti,
Tu nugas mihi milie garrienti,
Compresso memoras, Chloe, susurro
Aras, flammea, nuptias, pudorem,
Et quantum est hominum severiorum.
Aut nugas precor aut nihil! valeto;
Nimis seria, ini Chloe, laboras.

CAVEBIS, Abra, dum Cupidinum curæ
Periculosis te morantur in nugis;
Dum Veneris arma ludicro cies bello,
Nutus, susurros, lacrymas, jocos, risus,

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