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WALK UP

VAVUI FUNS SHOW

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WALK UP! WALK UP! THE extinguisher of Father Time had all but fallen on the dying and spluttering flame of 1882, when FUN manipulated with dexterity his own “ Patent Luminiferous Dobrowoski Blacking-Brush Electric Light”-a light clear, brilliant, and lucid as himself. FUN then used his well-padded drumsticks with appalling vigour on his largest and most discordant drum, and began his New Year's address to the British Public as follows:

“Dear B. P., you imagine probably that I am about to puff my own show, in which case it's a hundred-ton gun to a penny peashooter you are right. Somebody or other (an unread Republican, possibly) once remarked, 'The British Public is a hass !' which utterance was neither polite nor true. The B. P. is, on the contrary, remarkably 'fly;' but at the same time it is sceptical, and will not believe in shows that are not puffed. Therefore," continued Fun, while he gracefully bowed (at least, as gracefully as a jester with a big drumslung round his neck could bow) and cocked his left optic pleasantly at the British Public, “therefore, though I assert in a fearless manner that I can give any other comic show in the world 'points, and win, I am not afraid to admit that there are several others in existence of most excellent quality ; but before I'll ever be beaten, hang me! I'll—I 'll- » Here FUN plied his drumsticks so furiously, that the drums of the British Public's ears, as well as his own sonorous instrument, were nearly broken,

“ If you are never beaten," shrieked the drum, "I am. Don't be quite so handy with those sticks, guv'nor!”

“Dear B. P.,” resumed FUN, disdaining to notice the appeal, “ I have re-engaged for this year, that has just made its welcome appearance, some of the most eccentric Comic Artists and peculiar Comic Journalists of the present day—and a few of 'em are eccentric and peculiar, you bet. I allow them to stand on their heads in the office, to appropriate my best cigars, to incite my head clerk to sing 'Tiddy-fol-lol !' during office hours, to dance with the Office Boy's great-aunt, and all for your sake, dear B. P. I have to put up with much in order to provide my grand weekly show for you, B. P.”

Here Fun showed signs of weeping, but the cheers of the B. P. revived him. And once more the big drum had cause

for serious complaint. “Walk up! walk up!” cried the People's Jester ; "plank down your pennies, and revel in the most mirth-creating show in the world!”

VOL. XXXVII. -NO, 921,

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SLABAES AND PUFFS.

facts; while the son would only look for corroboration of what he had

already made up Y my halidome

his mind to as
and in good the truth; and
sooth, the life of at the worst nei.
the humble no- ther of these
ticer becometh points appears
more than bear. So weak to me
able ! Time was as Sir George's
when of half a rather

oppor
dozen plays, tune brain-lever,
nay, of more time · honourei
the proportion and perfectly
that did not allowable as the
weary, or out. device is.
rage, or inap-
propriately Anyway, we

might forgive
one, and weari.

something more ness of spirit fell than this to the upon the noticer authors of such and dulled his a sterling playdays, whereas not so much a of late it seem. brilliantly writ.

eth, and indeed ten play as one THE Court.-COME READY TO ENJOY Cumrades. is, that he is not strong in human

The Savoy.—MORE ÆSTHETICISM, Two TOOTLING,

dulled, nay, ab- interest (which solutely enjoyeth himself in ten times to the extent of nine-tenths of 1 is probably the secret of its power)—and one giving opportunity for such ten, so that the noticer goeth cheerily to his

magnificent acting as that of Mr. Clayton work and beginneth to believe that the stage

and Mr. Coghlan in the second act. The of his country is at last showing itself worthy

acting throughout shows all the completeness, of its possibilities.

care, and delicately handled power which

are characteristic of the company, but Mr. This improvement is distinctly attributable

Coghlan's picture of mental struggle and to Mr. Fun-it is useless for that gentleman

pain in this scene and the following one with to attempt to conceal the fact; did not "the

Lady Constance will not be easily excelled or little house in Tottenham Street” inaugurate

readily forgotten. Miss Marion Terry is that school of quiet art and natural acting

graceful and tender as ever as Lady Con. which is the guiding star of modern effort?

stance. Mr. Mackintosh's rather obtrusive Did not the late T. W. Robertson supply

Tom Stirrup is a good study

of an unconven. them with the means of inauguration, and

tional Irishman, and Mr. D. G. Boucicault was not be an honoured member of Mr.

looks lovely in the full uniform and medals he Fon's most poble army of witty ones? But

lavished upon himself in the last act. the blush of conscious modesty rises to the gifted one's cheek, and I pass from the topic.

Mr. Gilbert's Yolanthe, except that it is

rather thinner in plot than his previous pieces The comparative newness of the authors of

of the series, is just what one might have ex. the Silver King as authors, and the absolute

pected it to be: quaint turns of thought, newness of one of the authors (and that the

whimsical incongruities, demure liberties principal one concerned, I believe) of Com.

taken with exalted personages, perfect com. rades, will surely justify these opening re

mand of the technicalities of expression (no marks. There are said to be two weak points

less in prose than in rhyme), Miss Alice in Comrades (it is good when stress is laid

The Savoy.-AN HOP-ERRATIC CHANCELLOR.

Barnett, Mr. Grossmith, Miss Gwynne—all, upon “ weak points," there must be some.

all are there, and, in spite of the familiarity of thing strong about the article). The first

their features, invested with a freshness which point is the General's concealment of his first marriage from his second only Mr. Gilbert himself could give them. The acting of the Savoy

wife, but I ven. company is nei-
ture (with fear ther better nor
and trembling, worse than
of course) to usual, which is
think that this quite sufficiently
is a very pro-

good, and the
bable thing un. singing, except
der the circum- in the case of
stances and con- Miss Braham
ditions in which (whose words
it is placed in are indistin.
the story. The guishable even
other point, the with the assist.
ambiguity of

of the language which book), and Mr. causes Darleigh Grossmith (who to believe him. bas not

been self illegitimate, provided by Na also seems very

ture with a singnatural to me :

ing voice, al. taking the pro

though she has bable bent of supplied him

man's with a certain The Savoy.-STILL Æsthetic, NOT QUITE OUT OF

thoughts at the dry bumour
moment,
the which enables

The Savoy.-TAKING UP A SOLDIER.
question of ille.

bim to carry off gitimacy would never occur to the father at all his knowledge of the the deficiency) possesses the necessary qualities of tunefulness. NESTOR,

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“An All-Rounder." THOUGH most regard their Fon no end Their guide, philosopher, and friend, There are who look on him as quite Beneath their ken—which isn't right. 'Tis not for these that he essays To annotate the Christmas plays; No, no! his love for such is dim; 'Tis done for those who 're fond of him. For these alone he goes betimes To all the plays and pantomimes, For these alone he does the round, And begs to mention what he's found. And first with favour be regards The Covent Garden Promenardes; (He likes them well-suggests a callThere's "smoking" in the Floral Hall). There's Sindbad starts a brilliant reign Within the walls of Drury Lane, So great in play, in cast and dress, A pure emb-Harris de richesse; The Yellow Dwarf will please the town (Although that dwarf needs cutting down), And at Her Majesty's will run Until the new Pandora "'s done. Then let us take a cab, old pal, And off to the Imperial, Where Jack the Giant Killer shows (As “ Hobson's choice," we may suppose), Or seek the distant Sadler's Wells, Where Crusoe in his glory dwells, Or seek the still more distant Britt., And give that Lane a turn, to wit. Then mark the new-raised Alcazar Where Cinderella reigns the star, A favourite; for see, we have Another of her at "the Pav." Though Whittington like praise may own (See Avenue and Marylebone); And there two Hoods, it's plain to see, At Hengler's and the Standard be. Then some for fun may put to use The Elephant and Castle Goose; The Forty Thieves at Crystal Pal., Or Messrs. Sanger's Bluff King Hal ; Or if you are an aunt or pa, (As very many people a') You 'll take some puss in shoes (which soots) To see the Surrey Puss in Boots. Who cry for taste and acting too Should make a fuss with Much Ado, Or listen to the sterling ring There is about The Silver King; Or how Jane Eyre her part sustains And Jane Eyre-al approval gains ; Or pleased see Comrades win, no less Than mark a Rivals' great success. Nor let the Haymarket be passed, Though shortly 't will be losing Caste, Nor miss where the St. James's lives For art, and nightly Impulse gives ; Let Love or Money be their choice For melodrame who raise the voice, While we, for those who'd laugh, rehearse Some items in a final verse. Eloped 's the means the Strand e.nploys To make you "reg'lar roar," my buys. The Novelty Melita plays; Then Valentine and o. 's the Ga's; The Comedy's is Rip; the O.. Comique's is ladies, as you know ; While Tooleseses is Girls and Boys, And Iolanthe the Savoy's. Ye who in holidays rejoice Peruse the list and make your choice ; But ye who would select a gem Observe what NESTOR says of them.

A SA-TIS JAM! Miss] Edith.—"AND YOU 'RE TAKING GREAT CARE OF YOUR THROAT, I SEE, MR. DE BROMLEY."

Mr. Reginald de Bromley:—"Aw !_YES. I'M TO SING AT THE BICKLEYS' TO-NIGHT, DON'T YOU KNOW? AND I'M TRYING TO PRESERVE WHAT LITTLE VOICE I HAVE,"

Miss Fanny la rattle).-OH! THEN YOU THINK IT'SWEET' ENOUGH TO 'PRESERVE,' MR. DE BROMLEY, DO YOU?”

[Mr. Reginald de Bromley (after vainly endeavouring to make an appropriate re

partee) is obliged to pursue the light tenor" of his way, or rather the way of The light tenor, discomfiled.

The Ire Education Question. Here's a lark !-another appropriate name. Look here :-"A lad was charged with stealing sugar from a van in the Wandsworth Road. Mr. Iremonger, the School Board officer, informed his worship

Just picture to yourself the anger and deep-seated yearning for vengeance stirred up in any neighbourhood by the visit of a School Board officer, and then say to yourself, “Mr. Iremonger !" Hol ho! By Jove! Talk about appropri — just fancy now!

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THAT RETARDED POSTAL DELIVERY QUESTION-(SOME CAUSES OF THOSE DISGRACEFUL DELAYS).

Of course we would not suggest that the public is itself in any way responsible for the lateness of its letters; but still

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Here's a postman on his round. Cause of delay No. 1.—The thoughtless person (Mr. Legion) who will not have a letter-box. The party who will have a name,

instead of a number, to his hovel.

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Pet dogs with an aversion to uniforms. At the end of his round the postman arrives at the residence of Indignant City Man. -I. C. M. writes to the papers.

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THE NEW YEAR'S PARTY.-OUT IN THE COLD.

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