Cultural Politics in Modern India: Postcolonial prospects, colourful cosmopolitanism, global proximities

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Routledge, Jan 22, 2016 - Social Science - 306 pages
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India’s global proximities derive in good measure from its struggle against British imperialism. In its efforts to become a nation, India turned modern in its own unusual way. At the heart of this metamorphosis was a "colourful cosmopolitanism," the unique manner in which India made the world its neighbourhood. The most creative thinkers and leaders of that period reimagined diverse horizons. They collaborated not only in widespread anti-colonial struggles but also in articulating the vision of alter-globalization, universalism, and cosmopolitanism. This book, in revealing this dimension, offers new and original interpretations of figures such as Kant, Tagore, Heidegger, Gandhi, Aurobindo, Gebser, Kosambi, Narayan, Ezekiel, and Spivak. It also analyses cultural and aesthetic phenomena, from the rasa theory to Bollywood cinema, explaining how Indian ideas, texts, and cultural expressions interacted with a wider world and contributed to the making of modern India.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
PART I Postcolonial prospects
27
PART II Colourful cosmopolitanism
99
PART III Global proximities
195
Index
291
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About the author (2016)

Makarand R. Paranjape is Professor of English at the Centre for English Studies, School of Language, Literature and Culture Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. He was the inaugural Eric Auerbach Visiting Chair in Global Literary Studies at the University of Tubingen, Germany, and served as the first ICCR Chair in Indian Studies at the National University of Singapore. His latest works includes The Death and Afterlife of Mahatma Gandhi (2014) and Swami Vivekananda: A Contemporary Reader (2015).

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