Appletons' Popular Science Monthly, Volume 50

Front Cover
William Jay Youmans
D. Appleton and Company, 1897 - Science
 

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Page 192 - As the hart panteth after the water-brooks, so panteth my soul after thee, O God. My soul thirsteth for God, for the living God : when shall I come and appear before God...
Page 474 - The negotiation of sales of goods which are in another State, for the purpose of introducing them into the State in which the negotiation is made, is interstate commerce.
Page 471 - The result is a conviction that the states have no power, by taxation or otherwise, to retard, impede, burden, or in any manner control the operations of the constitutional laws enacted by Congress to carry into execution the powers vested in the general government.
Page 617 - It would reduce the whole instrument to a single phrase, that of instituting a Congress with power to do whatever would be for the good of the United States...
Page 153 - The theory of our governments, State and national, is opposed to the deposit of unlimited power anywhere. The executive, the legislative, and the judicial branches of these governments are all of limited and defined powers.
Page 46 - SEE what a lovely shell, Small and pure as a pearl, Lying close to my foot, Frail, but a work divine, Made so fairily well With delicate spire and whorl, How exquisitely minute, A miracle of design ! What is it ? a learned man Could give it a clumsy name.
Page 473 - That anterior to the formation of the Constitution, a course of legislation had prevailed in many, if not in all, of the states, which weakened the confidence of man in man, and embarrassed all transactions between individuals, by dispensing with a faithful performance of engagements. To correct this mischief, by restraining the power which produced it, the state...
Page 439 - It is the final product of that process which begins with' a mere colligation of crude observations, goes on establishing propositions that are broader and more separated from particular cases, and ends in universal propositions. Or to bring the definition to its simplest and clearest form: — Knowledge of the lowest kind is un-unified knowledge ; Science is partially -unified knowledge; Philosophy is completely-unified knowledge.
Page 143 - DANIEL TREADWELL, Rumford Professor and Lecturer on the Application of Science to the Useful Arts, 1834-1845.
Page 616 - Have Congress a right to raise and appropriate the money to any and to every purpose according to their will and pleasure? They certainly have not.

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