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Memoirs of Adj. Gen. Ramel - - 346
Melville's, Lord Viscount, Trial of 78
Mental Recreations - - - - 82
Miseries of Human Life, Antidote to 426
Mollcson's Miscellanies - - - 253
Moore's Sermon at Rochester - 81
Moore's Lives of Alberonj and Rip-

perda ---«..-__ 327
Moral Evidence, Gambier on - 422
—— Science, Forsyth's Principles

of 97. 211.

Murray's, L Power of Religion - 277
Musical Grammar, Calcott's - 535

Q.

N.

Napoleon, and the French under
his Empire -----. 179

Navy, Derrick's Memoirs of Royal 354
Neill's Tour to Orkney and Shet-
land ------_. 339

Nelson, Lord, Beatty's Narrative of 447
Newman's Sermon ----- 35^

Nicholson's Vindication of the Scrip-
tures - - - - - - - 545

Nice, Ancient and Modern History
of 497

Observations, Schroeter's, at Lilian-
thai -------- 182.

Odell's Essay on English Elements,
Accents and Prosody - - - 131

Oriental Customs, S. Burder's,
Vol. II. 434

P.

Quakerism, Clarkson's Portraiture
of -- 318.381

Persian Verbs, Gilchrist's Theory
of 36

Persius, Translation of - - - 510
Pha?drus, Schwabe's Edition - - 280
Philosophy, Natural, Bryan's Lec-
tures on ------- 42

Pinkerton's Recollections of Paris 29
Pine's Dissertation on Hebrew

Routs 523

Pleading, Lawes's Treatise on - 243
Poems, Lane*s ------ 546

.Bath's •• 340

roetical Works, M' Neill's - 170

Poetry, Herbert's M iscellaneous - 310
Poet's Day ------- 447

Polybius, Fragment of, translated 179
Porchester, Lord, Letter to - - 175
Porson's Herodotus - - - 224

Ramel, Memoirs of Adj. Gen. - 34$
Rawlinson on Brewing - - - 181
Render's German Dictionany - 356
Richards's Welch Grammar - - 436
Ripperda, Duke, Life of - - - 327
Roberts's Mechanic's Assistant - 361
Robertson's Theological Lectures 230
Roucher de Ratte's Melanges - 88
Roullier's Greek Primitives in five

Languages - ----- 172

Russia, Advantages of, in a contest

with France ------ 278

, Literary Information

from ------- 94.188

Ruth, Lawson's Lectures on - - 479
Ryder's Sermon at Leicester - - 439

Sacred Hours ------ 276

Saurin's Sermons, translated by

Sutcliffe -- 47

Scenes for the Young - - - - 370

Schroeter's Observations made at
Lilienthal -------184

Scotland, Hall's Travels in - - 410
Scott's Ballads and Lyrical Pieces 374
Sermon, Allen's, at Lvnn - - - 54*-

, Aspland's, for* C. J. Fox 71

——, Belsham's, ditto - - 71

■ ■, Bogne's, for Lobb - - 440

, Brichan's, Fast - - - 80

, Burder's, for Moody - - 367

, Cracknell's, at Hoxton - 262

——, Dickenson's, for Bishop

Horsley 169

, Gaskin's ----- 168

, Graves's Consecration - 264

, Griffin's Fast - - - - 79

, Jebb's Visitation - - - 65

, Kingsbury's, for Towle, and

Kello's Address 178

, Knox's, for the Philanthro-
pic Society ------351

. Moore's at Rochester - 81

, Newman's ----- 358
, Ryder's Visitation - - 439

, Stevenson's Fast - - • 366

, S yles's Association - - 266

, Wnitakcr's Charity - - 441

.Winter's 300

Sern.ons, Brackenbury's Fifty three 10 , Beddome's - - - - 531

Page

Brewster's on the Acts - 406
Bruiningk's translated - 546
G.Clayton's - - - - 364

Draper's, on the liturgy 418
Grant's ------ 245

Sunn's ------ 366

Lawson's, on Ruth - - 478
iaunn's translated, vol. vii. 41
Six to Jews - - - - 173

ryerman's - - " 542

Van Mildert's on infide-

...----- 122

and Orkney, Neill's Tour

339

I's Employ, Fawcett's - 275
ide. New Reasons for abat-

268

—, Wilberforce's Letter

_ 429

iospel Delineated - - 588

Water Meadows - - 163
2. History of England - 247
i's, Bishop, Charge - - «56
d's, Bishop, Evidences of
anity ------ 315

ti's Fast Sermon - - - 366
issociation Sermon - - 266
•ssay on the Stage . - - 335
ent.Boucher's, to Johnson's
,ary ------ 303

:'s Exposition des Opera-
en Lapponie - - - - 370

s Architectural Etchings 362
- Designs for ornamental

escriptive, to the Lakes
Bishop of London's

, Pas*

Translation of Anacreon - - - 74

Chateaubriand - - - 526

Persius ----- 5)0
Travels, Browne's in Africa - 365.483

, Hall's in Scotland - - 410

, Neill's in Orkney, &c. - 339

Triomphe de l'Evangile - - - 376
Twiss's Verbal Index to Shakespeare 75
Tyerman's Sermons - - - - 542

Van Mildert's Historical View of In-
fidelity (Boylean Lecture) - 122

Vaughan's Address to his Pa-
rishioners ------- 81

Villey, Col., Bain's Narrative of - 81

W.

Water Meadows, Smith on - - 163
Webster's American Dictionary - 82
Welch Vocabulary and Grammar 436
Werneria ------- 176

Westring's Svenska Lafrarnas Farg-

historia ---.... 176
Whitaker's Sermon for the Rufuge

of the Destitute - - - - - 441
Whitbread, Cottingbam's Letter to 278

1 Hale's - - Do, - 157

Wilberforce's Letter on the Slave

Trade ---.--.-429
Winter's Sermon ----- 3GQ

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Art. I. An Account of the Life and Writings of James Beattie, LL. D. late Professor of Moral Philosophy and Logic, in the Marischal College and University of Aberdeen; including many of his Original Letters. By Sir William Forbes, of Pitsligo, Bart. 2 vols. pp. 850. 4to, 21. 12s. 6d. extra bds. royal, 51. 5s. Longman and Co. 1806.

"VyHEN a man of humble condition and education, who has cultivated literature under the pressure of many disadvantages, and perhaps distresses, comes before the public with a work which has cost him great labour, costs the purchaser hut a moderate price, and communicates very necessary, or at least very useful audscasonable information, he may justly claim for the faults of his book, the very last degree of forbearance, which criticism can exercise, without surrendering its essential laws. But when a man of fortune, who had a liberal education, who has been intimate with many of the most distinguished individuals, both in literature and rank, for forty years, who would indignantly disown any wish to raise money on the grave of his friend, who knows that an ample memoir of that friend has already been given to the public, and'-who adopts the easiest of all possible modes of making up volumes, publishes a splendid work, he will naturally disdain to be under any obligation to the clemency of critics. We shall therefore feel perfectly at liberty to express our honest opinion on Vol. III. B

these volumes; and laying out of the question all the excellences which the author doubtless possesses, we shall consider him simply in the character which he has assumed in appearing before the public.

We cannot but earnestly wish that the present epidemical disease in literature, the custom of making very large books about individuals, may in due time find, like other diseases, some limit to its prevalence, and at length decline and disappear. What is to become of readers, if the exit of every man of some literary eminence is thus to be followed' by a long array of publications, beginning with duodecimos, extending into octavos, and expanded at last into a battalion of magnificent quartos? This is reviving to some purpose the Theban method of attacking in the form of a wedge; and we do hope the curiosity, diligence, and patience of readers will at last be completely put to the rout.

This swelling fungous kind of biography confounds all the right proportions in which the, claims and the importance of individuals should be arranged, and exhibited to the attention of the public. When a private person, whose life was marked by few striking varieties, is thus brought forward in two volumes quarto, while many an individual of modern times, who influenced the fate of nations, has been confined to a sixth part of the compass, it reminds us too much of that political rule of proportion by which Old Sarum, consisting of one house, is represented by two illustrious senators, while many very populous towns are not' represented at all. If a professor of a college is to lie thus magnificently in state, what must be done for such a man as Mr. Pitt or Mr. Fox .' And still more, what must be done after the exit of some persons who are at present acting their part in human affairs? The French Encyclopedic will be,in point of bulk, but a horn-book in comparison of the stupendous host of folios, which must come forth after the departure of Bonaparte and Talleyrand; provided, that is to say, that sufficient materials, in the way of paper, ink, &c, can then be obtained wherewithal to furnish out this mighty blazon of monumental history. And by the way, the makers ot paper will do well to take the hint from us, and have their warehouses ready for the event which will happen soouer or later in their favour, though to the confusion and dismay of the most courageous and indefatigable readers. As to reviewers, the most industrious and incorruptible of all the servants of the public, they will then have the plea of absolute necessity for resorting to the practice of which they have sometimes been most unrighteously accused, that of reviewing books without inspecting them.

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