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LONO:64

OXFO

LONDON

PRINTED BY THE LONDON LITERARY SOCIETY,

376, STRAND, W.c.

CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.

PAGE

Jeremy Taylor's definition of Drunkenness—Jonathan Swift

Beer Drinking-Longevity of a Beer Drinker-Evils
Habitual Tipplers not the worst fellows in the world

1•13

CHAPTER II.

Legislative Interference in the sale of Intoxicating Drinks

Sabbath Rest—Taking Refreshments upon long Country
Walks-Shenstone's Lines in an Inn Window .

14.25

CHAPTER III.

One result of too free Beer Drinking–The Temptation 10

Drinking of inexperienced Travellers_Victims to good
fellowship-The difficulty of shaking off confirmed habits
of using Stimulants

26-39

CHAPTER IV.

My Wife's Influence-Alcohol stimulates the Imagination, but

depresses the Judgment-Resolve of Total Abstinence-
Aids to Temperance-Results of Self-Indulgence-Advan-
tage of entire Abstinence in intercourse with Habitual
Drinkers-Dr. Johnson's Experience --Barclay and Perkin's
Brewery.

.

40-53 CHAPTER V.

Jeremy Taylor's Definition of Drunkenness—Evil Consequences

of Drunkenness—Signs of Drunkenness, Rules for obtain-
ing Temperance-Signs and Effects of Temperance-The
Highest Degree of Sobriety-Evil Consequences of Sensu-
ality (in which must be included Immoderate Drinking) 54-62

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CHAPTER VI.

Habitual Drunkards' Act of 1879. .

· 63.70

CHAPTER VII.

A Rill from the Town l'ump"

71•79

CHAPTER I.

OF

JEREMY TAYLOR'S DEFINITION OF DRUNKENNESS. JONATHAN Swift. BEER DRINKING.

LONGEVITY

A BEER DRINKER. Evils. HABITUAL TIPPLERS NOT THE WORST FELLOWS IN THE WORLD.

AT

T this time when various efforts are being made in the

cause of Temperance, and the “Blue Ribbon Movement,” as it is called, has been the means of causing an unusual amount of attention to be directed to the subject of intemperate drinking, moderate drinking, and total abstinence from all alcoholic beverages, upon which a good deal of controversy has arisen, and difference of opinion expressed; it has occurred to me, that if the experience of an individual, was truly and candidly narrated, who has passed through all the different stages of the use and abuse of intoxicating liquors, in the course of a life extending over sixty years, giving due allowance to all considerations that might be fairly urged for, or against, the use of stimulants, without the frantic zeal of a zealot ; it might possibly be of considerable service to a good many persons capable from exercising similarity of choice-subject to the same apparent necessity-or lack of strength of will, to sympathise with the writer, and turn his experience to

B

2

Jeremy Twylor's definition of Drunkenness.

their own benefit, in analogous instances, or, at least, to take useful warning.

Jeremy Taylor's definition of Drunkenness.-I ought to remark here in reference to the title, or style of this little work, that, in giving my experience, when I term myself as having once been a drunkard, I must not be set down as at one time being on a par with those poor unfortunates, who abandon themselves to drinking without having regard to the slightest sense of decency; who give themselves. over entirely to the satiating of an inordinate appetite for stimulants, and are oblivious to anything else, like those miserable wretches who are sometimes seen hanging about the doors of public houses. But I regret to say that, I was. once an habitual drunkard, in the sense of the term as it is defined by Jeremy Taylor.

“ Drunkenness is an immoderate affection and use of drink. That I call immoderate is beside, or beyond, that order of good things for which God hath given us the use of drink, which, if we go at any time beyond, is inordinate and criminal, and is the vice of drunkenness. He that drinks much and is strong to bear it, and is not deprived of his reason violently, is guilty of the sin of drunkenness. Let your drink never go beyond such a refreshment, as may a little lighten the present load of a sad, or troubled spirit.”

In the first quarter of the present century, in which I was born, drinking was a habit with all who occupied such a position in life as could afford the expense.

My father used to consider himself a moderate man, I

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