Modernism and the Culture of Efficiency: Ideology and Fiction

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University of Toronto Press, 2009 - Literary Criticism - 344 pages
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Modernism and the Culture of Efficiency engages with the idea of efficiency as it emerged at the beginning of the twentieth century. Evelyn Cobley's close readings of modernist British fiction by writers as diverse as Aldous Huxley, Joseph Conrad, and E.M. Forster identify characters whose attitudes and behaviour patterns indirectly manifest cultural anxieties that can be traced to the conflicted logic of efficiency.

Revisiting the principles of work developed by Henry Ford and F.W. Taylor, Cobley draws out the broader social, political, cultural, and psychological implications of the assembly line and the efficiency expert's stopwatch. The pursuit of efficiency, she argues, was the often unintentional impetus for the development of social control mechanisms that gradually infiltrated the consciousness of individuals and eventually suffused the fabric of society. Evelyn Cobley's sophisticated analysis is the first step in understanding an ideology that has received little attention from literary critics despite its broad sociocultural implications.

 

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Contents

Elation and Doubt
25
Henry Ford and F
38
The Iron Cage and
113
Wells Shaw Orwell
153
Joseph Conrads Heart of Darkness
185
D H Lawrences Women in Love
203
Ford Madox Fords The Good
224
Aldous Huxleys Brave
282
Notes
313
Works Cited
325
Index
335
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Evelyn Cobley is a professor in the Department of English at the University of Victoria.

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