The Works of Francis Bacon: Translations of the philosophical works

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 503 - Critical and Historical Essays contributed to the Edinburgh Review. By the Right Hon. Lord MACAULAY. CHEAP EDITION, crown 8vo. 3*. 6</. STUDENT'S EDITION, crown 8vo. 6s. PEOPLE'S EDITION, 2 vols. crown 8vo. 8s. CABINET EDITION, 4 vols. 24*.
Page 252 - For man by the fall fell at the same time from his state of innocency and from his dominion over creation. Both of these losses however can even in this life be in some part repaired ; the former by religion and faith, the latter by arts and sciences.
Page 410 - He hath made man of the dust of the earth, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life...
Page 106 - But for my part I do not trouble myself with any such speculative and withal unprofitable matters. My purpose, on the contrary, is to try whether I cannot in very fact lay more firmly the foundations, and extend more widely the limits, of the power and greatness of man.
Page 367 - For to say that the hairs of the eyelids are for a quickset and fence about the sight; or that the firmness of the skins and hides of living creatures is to defend them from the extremities of heat or cold; or that the bones are for the columns or beams, whereupon the frames of the bodies of living creatures are built...
Page 62 - ... extreme admiration of antiquity, others to an extreme love and appetite for novelty; but few so duly tempered that they can hold the mean, neither carping at what has been well laid down by the ancients, nor despising what is well introduced by the moderns. This however turns to the great injury of the sciences and philosophy: since these affectations of antiquity and novelty are the...
Page 62 - But the Idols of the Market-place arc the most troublesome of all : idols which have crept into the understanding through the alliances of words and names. For men believe that their reason governs words ; but it is also true that words react on the understanding ; and this it is that has rendered philosophy and the sciences sophistical and inactive.
Page 60 - But by far the greatest hindrance and aberration of the human understanding proceeds from the dulness, incompetency, and deceptions of the senses ; in that things which strike the sense outweigh things which do not immediately strike it, though they be more important.
Page 388 - The first is the discontinuance of the ancient and serious diligence of Hippocrates, which used to set down a narrative of the special cases of his patients, and how they proceeded, and how they were judged by recovery or death.
Page 60 - Such then are the idols which I call Idols of the Tribe; and which take their rise either from the homogeneity of the substance of the human spirit, or from its preoccupation, or from its narrowness, or from its restless motion, or from an infusion of the affections, or from the incompetency of the senses, or from the mode of impression.

Bibliographic information