The Essayes Or Counsels Civill and Morall of Francis Bacon, Lord Verulam

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J.M. Dent & Company, 1907 - 199 pages
 

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Contents

XXIX
89
XXX
98
XXXIII
104
XXXV
110
XXXIX
119
riun
131
TClVIII
148
UI
156

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Page 3 - WHAT is Truth? said jesting Pilate; and would not stay for an answer. Certainly there be that delight in giddiness', and count it a bondage to fix a belief; affecting free-will in thinking, as well as in acting.
Page 4 - Certainly it is heaven upon earth to have a man's mind move in charity, rest in providence, and turn upon the poles of truth.
Page 74 - Surely every medicine is an innovation, and he that will not apply new remedies must expect new evils; for time is the greatest innovator...
Page 4 - ... it ; for these winding and crooked courses are the goings of the serpent, which goeth basely upon the belly and not upon the feet. There is no vice that doth so cover a man with shame as to be found false and perfidious.
Page 74 - All this is true, if time stood still; which, contrariwise, moveth so round, that a froward retention of custom is as turbulent a thing as an innovation ; and they that reverence too much old times are but a scorn to the new.
Page xxxi - And because the breath of flowers is far sweeter in the air (where it comes and goes like the warbling of music) than in the hand, therefore nothing is more fit for that delight, than to know what be the flowers and plants that do best perfume the air.
Page 5 - If it be well weighed, to say that a man lieth, is as much to say as that he is brave towards God and a coward towards men." For a lie faces God, and shrinks from man. Surely the wickedness of falsehood and breach of faith cannot possibly be so highly expressed as in that it shall be the last peal to call the judgments of God upon the generations of men; it being foretold that when Christ cometh, "he shall not find faith upon the earth.
Page 85 - I mean aid, and bearing a part in all actions and occasions. Here the best way to represent to life the manifold use of friendship, is to cast and see how many things there are which a man cannot do himself; and then it will appear that it was a sparing speech of the ancients to say, That a friend is another himself; for that a friend is far more than himself.
Page 109 - Believe not much them that seem to despise riches ; for they despise them that despair of them ; and none worse, when they come to them. Be not pennywise ; riches have wings, and sometimes they fly away of themselves, sometimes they must be set flying to bring in more.
Page 22 - HE that hath wife and children hath given hostages to fortune ; for they are impediments to great enterprises, either of virtue or mischief. Certainly the best works, and of greatest merit for the public, have proceeded from the unmarried or childless men ; which both in affection and means have married and endowed the public.

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