Half-hours with the stars

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Robert Hardwicke, 1869 - Stars - 22 pages
 

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Page 15 - Thro' cells of madness, haunts of horror and fear, That I come to be grateful at last for a little thing : My mood is changed, for it fell at a time of year When the face of night is fair on the dewy downs, And the shining daffodil dies, and the Charioteer And starry Gemini hang like glorious crowns Over Orion's grave low down in the west...
Page 3 - HALF-HOURS WITH THE STARS: a Plain and Easy Guide to the Knowledge of the Constellations. Showing in 12 Maps the position of the principal Star-Groups night after night throughout the year. With Introduction and a separate Explanation of each Map. True for every Year.
Page 10 - The following table exhibits the names of all the stars of the first three magnitudes to -which astronomers have given names ; at least, all those whose names are in common use...
Page 7 - EAST to gain a knowledge of the stars, if the learner sets to work in the proper manner. But he commonly meets with a difficulty at the outset of his task. He provides himself with a set of the ordinary star-maps, and then finds himself at a loss how to make use of them. Such maps tell him nothing of the position of the constellations on the sty. If he happen to recognise a constellation, then indeed his maps, if properly constructed, will tell him the names of the stars forming the constellation...
Page 7 - Such maps tell him nothing of the position of the constellations on the sky. If he happen to recognize a constellation, then, indeed, his maps, if properly constructed, will tell him the names of the stars forming the constellation, and also he may be able to recognize a few of the neighboring constellations. But when he has done this, he may meet with a new difficulty, even as respects this very constellation. For if he look for it again some months later, he will neither find it in its former place,...
Page 15 - It is impossible not to recognise, from the configuration of this constellation as now seen, that the ancients looked on the stars which form the Lesser Bear as forming a wing of Draco.

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