The Book of Humorous Verse

Front Cover
George H. Doran Company, 1920 - American poetry - 962 pages

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Companions
63
A Plea for Trigamy Owen Seaman
70
Homeopathic Soup Unknown
77
The Fishermans Chant F C Burnand
86
Ai lazing Facts About Food Unknown
92
An Old Bachelor
98
Reflections on Cleopatheras Needle Cormac OLeary
106
Hiram Hover
113
Mis Smith
119
Over the
125
A
132
Husband
134
Wing Tee
139
A Dialogue from Plato Austin Dobson
142
Nothing to Wear
148
Mrs Smith
155
The New Church Organ Will Carleton
166
The Retort
174
How to Ask and Have Samuel Lover
185
Lilies
188
Feminine Arithmetic Charles Graham Halpine
191
Gifts Returned
198
My Love and My Heart Henry S Leigh
204
The Secret Combination Ellis Parker Butler
209
The Sabine Farmers Serenade Father Prout
217
Ballade of Forgotten Loves Arthur Grissom
223
Miniver Cheevy Edwin Arlington Robinson
229
PostImpressionism
235
A Grain of Salt
241
The Three Black Crows John Byrom
254
A Modest
260
The Devonshire Lane John Marriott
267
The Learned Negro Unknown
274
Trust in Women
276
Of a Certain Man Sir John Harrington
283
Fable
290
The Razor Seller John Wolcot
297
The Devils Walk on Earth Robert Southey
307
Thursday
313
After Horace
320
John Grumlie
326
Philliss
332
A Ballade of an AntiPuritan G K Chesterton
338
The Joys of Marriage Charies
344
The Annuity
350
Fin de Siecle
357
The Fool and the Poet
363
On a FullLength Portrait
369
Soldier Rest Robert J Burdette
375
A Little Swirl of Vers Libre Thomas R Ybarra
380
Lament of the ScotchIrish Exile James Jeffrey Roche
386
The Cantelope
393
C
399
An Idyll of Phatte and Leene Unknown
406
To Julia in Shooting Togs Owen Seaman
418
Imitation of Walt Whitman Unknown
436
BATHOS
443
Optimism
445
The Bitter Bit William E Ayloun
451
The Imaginative Crisis Unknown
457
Styx River Anthology Carolyn Wells
521
Song of the Springtide Unknown
527
How the Daughters Come Down
533
Only Seven
543
The Wofile New Ballad of Jane
552
Misadventures at Margate Richard Harris Barham
558
The Diverting History of John
565
Paddy ORafther Samuel Lover
571
The Jester Condemned to Death Horace Smith
578
The Well of St Keyne Robert Southey
584
The Knight and the Lady Richard Harris Barham
590
An Eastern Question H M Paull
601
The Goose Lord Tennyson
611
Charles E Carryl
617
Tam OShanter
623
Ferdinando and Elvira W S Gilbert
635
The Story of Prince Agib W S Gilbert
644
Jim
652
The Enchanted Shirt John
658
The Alarmed Skipper James T Fields
664
Ballad by Hans Breitmann Charles Godfrey Leland
672
The Romance of the Carpet Robert J Burdelte
680
Skipper Iresons Ride John Greenleaf Whillier
688
The Donnybrook Jig Viscount Dillon
700
The Ballad of Bouillabaisse W M Thackeray
714
Barney Mcgee
721
John Barleycorn
730
Ode to a Bobtailed
736
The Irishman and the Lady William Maginn
742
Bellagcholly Days
747
Lay of Ancient Rome Thomas R Ybarra
753
The Zealless Xylographer Mary Mapes Dodge
760
Old Grimes
766
Half Hours with the Classics H J DeBurgh
779
Life Unknown
785
Similes
791
Sally Simpkins Lament Thomas Hood
800
A Ternary of Littles Upon
806
Conjugal Conjugations A W Bellaw
812
Lovelilts
824
To My Nose
832
Uffia
877
A Ballad of Bediam William
886
The
892
Nirvana
900
The Viper
906
A Darwinian Ballad
913
The Young Gazelle Walter Parke
921
Leedle Yawcob Strauss Charles Follen Adams
941
Bunches of Grapes
947
Dirge
955
250
956
264
965
00 00 00 00
968
Prior to Miss Belles Appearance James Whitcomb Riley
974
615
976
Frederick Moron
977
Home and Mother
980
C
981
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 898 - The time has come', the Walrus said, 'To talk of many things: Of shoes - and ships - and sealing wax Of cabbages - and kings And why the sea is boiling hot And whether pigs have wings.
Page 564 - JOHN GILPIN was a citizen Of credit and renown, A trainband captain eke was he Of famous London town. John Gilpin's spouse said to her dear, Though wedded we have been These twice ten tedious years, yet we No holiday have seen. To-morrow is our wedding day, And we will then repair Unto the Bell at Edmonton All in a chaise and pair. My sister, and my sister's child, Myself, and children three, Will fill the chaise ; so you must ride On horseback after we.
Page 382 - One touch to her hand, and one word in her ear, When they reached the hall door, and the charger stood near; So light to the croupe the fair lady he swung, So light to the saddle before her he sprung ! — "She is won ! we are gone, over bank, bush, and scaur ! They'll have fleet steeds that follow !
Page 564 - And we will then repair Unto the Bell at Edmonton All in a chaise and pair. My sister, and my sister's child, Myself, and children three, Will fill the chaise ; so you must ride On horseback after we. He soon replied, I do admire Of womankind but one, And you are she, my dearest dear, Therefore it shall be done. I am a linendraper bold, As all the world doth know, And my good friend the calender Will lend his horse to go.
Page 581 - ... em, Never an axe had seen their chips, And the wedges flew from between their lips, Their blunt ends frizzled like celery-tips; Step and prop-iron, bolt and screw, Spring, tire, axle, and linchpin too, Steel of the finest, bright and blue; Thoroughbrace bison-skin, thick and wide; Boot, top, dasher, from tough old hide Found in the pit when the tanner died. That was the way he "put her through.
Page 110 - GOD makes sech nights, all white an' still Fur 'z you can look or listen, Moonshine an' snow on field an' hill, All silence an' all glisten. Zekle crep' up quite unbeknown An' peeked in thru' the winder, An' there sot Huldy all alone, 'ith no one nigh to hender. A fireplace filled the room's one side With half a cord o' wood in — There warn't no stoves (tell comfort died) To bake ye to a puddin'.
Page 688 - Body of turkey, head of owl, Wings a-droop like a rained-on fowl, Feathered and ruffled in every part, Skipper Ireson stood in the cart. Scores of women, old and young, Strong of muscle, and glib of tongue, Pushed and pulled up the rocky lane, Shouting and singing the shrill refrain: "Here's Flud Oirson, fur his horrd horrt Torr'd an' futherr'd an' corr'd in a corrt By the women o...
Page 624 - O'er a' the ills o" life victorious ! But pleasures are like poppies spread, You seize the flow'r, its bloom is shed ; Or like the snow falls in the river, A moment white — then melts for ever; Or like the Borealis race, That flit ere you can point their place; Or like the rainbow's lovely form Evanishing amid the storm.
Page 485 - You are old, father William" the young man said, " And your hair has become very white; And yet you incessantly stand on your head — Do you think, at your age, it is right ? " "In my youth," father William replied to his son, " I feared it might injure the brain; But now that I'm perfectly sure I have none, Why, I do it again and again.
Page 869 - Twas brillig, and the slithy toves Did gyre and gimble in the wabe: All mimsy were the borogoves. And the mome raths outgrabe.

Bibliographic information