The Wild Silk Moths of North America: A Natural History of the Saturniidae of the United States and Canada

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Cornell University Press, 1996 - Nature - 250 pages
2 Reviews
The Saturniidae are among the largest and showiest moths in North America. This comprehensive work covers the life history and taxonomy of a hundred species and subspecies. The adults and larvae of all species are illustrated in thirty color plates, which are supplemented by line drawings of cocoons, photographs of behavior, and distribution maps.
More than a natural history, this book includes chapters on population biology, life history strategies, disease and parasitoids, and the importance of silk moths to human culture. The systematic account emphasizes genetic differences among populations and the process of speciation and presents new information on experimental hybridization and life histories. For the student, researcher, and naturalist practical information is offered on collecting, rearing, and conducting original research. The entire text is referenced to an extensive bibliography.
 

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The wild silk moths of North America: a natural history of the Saturniidae of the United States and Canada

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An entomologist (Tuskes), collector (James P. Tuttle), and zoologist (Michael M. Collins), all having a common interest in wild silk moths (family Saturniidae) have combined their expertise to write ... Read full review

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This is a great book for learning about and rearing these fantastic moths. Anyone who is an insect lover should have a copy of this book in their library.

Contents

Acknowledgments
1
Parasitism
24
Collecting
39
Rearing
45
Silk Moths and Human Culture
52
Subfamily Ceratocampinae
59
Eacles
64
imperialis pini
66
neumoegeni
132
burnsi
134
chinatiensis
135
griffini
137
eglanterina eglanterina
138
eglanterina shastaensis
140
eglanterina annulata
141
Other Hemileuca eglanterina Populations
143

oslari
68
Anisota
69
stigma
70
manitobensis
71
consularis
73
virginiensis
74
senatoria
76
finlaysoni
77
peigleri
78
Oslari
79
Dryocampa
80
Sphingicampa
82
bisecta
83
bicolor
85
heiligbrodti
86
hubbardi
87
blanchardi
88
montana
90
raspa
91
albolineata
92
Adeloneivaia
93
Subfamily Hemileucinae
95
doris
96
luski
98
pandora pandora
99
pandora davisi
101
velda
102
Hemileuca
103
tricolor
106
hualapai
107
oliviae
109
maia maia
111
maia peigleri
114
lucina
115
nevadensis
117
slosseri
119
maia complex Great Lakes Region Populations
120
electra electra
122
electra clio
124
electra mojavensis
125
electra Lower Colorado Desert Population
126
juno
127
grotei grotei
128
grotei diana
130
stonel
131
hera hera
145
hera marcata
147
hera magnifica
148
Automeris
149
io io
150
io neomexicana
152
louisiana
153
patagoniensis
155
iris hesselorum
157
cecrops pamina
158
zephyria
159
randa
160
Subfamily Saturniinae
162
mendocino
163
walterorum
166
albofasciata
168
Agapema
169
galbina
170
anoma anona
171
homogena
175
Antheraea
176
polyphemus
177
oculea
179
Actias
182
Samia
184
Rothschildia
187
cincta cincta
189
Eupackardia
191
Callosamia
194
angulifera
197
securifera
198
Hyalophora
200
cecropia
201
columbia columbia
205
columbia gloveri
207
euryalus
211
kasloensis and Other Hybrid Populations in the Pacific Northwest
213
HostParasitoid Records
217
Saturniid Hybrids
224
Literature Cited
227
Subject Index
241
Taxonomic Index
244
Index to Host Plants
247
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

Michael M. Collins is a scientific research associate in the section of Invertebrate Zoology at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh. He is a coauthor of Wild Silk Moths of North America and has published widely in the fields of Natural hybridization and speciation. He lives in Nevada City, California.

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