M. Tulli Ciceronis Cato Maior de Senectute: A Dialogue on Old Age (Classic Reprint)

Front Cover
1kg Limited, Mar 18, 2018 - 134 pages
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
Excerpt from M. Tulli Ciceronis Cato Maior De Senectute: A Dialogue on Old Age

It has been the aim of this revision to preserve the general characteristics of the old edition while making such changes as newly accessible material and new methods of instruction have made desirable, - such changes as the original editors would have been likely to make if they had lived to carry through the work of revision.

About the Publisher

Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com

This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

About the author (2018)

Born in Arpinum on January 3, 106 B.C., Marcus Tullius Cicero was a Roman orator, writer, and politician. In Rome, Cicero studied law, oratory, philosophy, and literature, before embarking on a political career. Banished from Rome in 59 B.C. for the execution of some members of the Catiline group, Cicero devoted himself to literature. Cicero was pardoned by Julius Caesar in 47 B.C., and returned to Rome to deliver his famous speeches, known as the "Philippics," urging the senate to declare war on Marc Antony. Cicero's chief works, written between 46 and 44 B.C., can be classified in the categories of philosophical works, letters, and speeches. The letters, edited by his secretary Tiro, showcase a unique writing style and charm. The most popular work of the period was De Officiis, a manual of ethics, in which Cicero espoused fundamental Christian values half a century before Christ. Cicero was murdered in Formiae, Italy, on December 4, 43 B.C., by Antony's soldiers after the triumvirate of Antony, Lepidus, and Octavius was formed.

Bibliographic information