An Introduction to Greek and Latin Etymology

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Macmillan, 1872 - Greek language - 454 pages

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Page 360 - Atque haec ipsa S littera ab his nominibus exclusa in quibusdam ipsa alteri successit, nam mertare atque pultare...
Page 39 - Languai)e, c. 18, p. 202. lopment of other roots (eg gan, gnu) that a more original form was sat: in which case the explanation does not seem so probable. It is essentially a guess and incapable of verification. On this question of the connection between idea and form, I adopt unhesitatingly Kenan's view1, "La liaison du sens et du mot n'est jamais ne'cessaire, jamais arbitraire, toujours elle est motive'e.
Page 110 - I venture to suggest that Teutonic and Italic Aryans witnessed the transition of the oak period into the beech period, of the bronze age into the iron age, and that while the Greeks retained phegos in its original sense, the Teutonic and Italian colonists transferred the name, as an appellative, to the new forests that were springing up in their wild homes.
Page iii - PEILE (JOHN, MA)— AN INTRODUCTION TO GREEK AND LATIN ETYMOLOGY. By JOHN PEILE, MA, Fellow and Tutor of Christ's College, Cambridge, formerly Teacher of Sanskrit in the University of Cambridge. Third and Revised Edition. Crown 8vo.
Page 5 - all articulate sounds," he says, "are produced by effort, by expenditure of muscular energy in the throat, lungs, and mouth. This effort, like every other that man makes, he has an instinctive disposition to seek relief from, to avoid: we may call it laziness, or we may call it economy: it is in fact either the one or the other according to the circumstances of each particular case : it is laziness when it gives up more than it gains: it is economy when it gains more than it abandons.
Page 5 - All articulate sounds are produced by effort, by expenditure of muscular energy, in the lungs, throat, and mouth. This effort, like every other which man makes, he has an instinctive disposition to seek relief from, to avoid : we may call it laziness, or we may call it economy ; it is, in fact, either the one or the other, according to the circumstances of each separate case : it is laziness when it gives up more than it gains ; economy, when it gains more than it abandons.
Page 65 - ... contrary, can be sounded, because, in pronouncing it more or less distinctly, the breath is checked near the chordae vocales, and can there be intoned. This simplest breathing, in its double character of asper and lenis, can be modified in eight different ways by interposing certain barriers or gates formed by the tongue, the soft and hard palate, the teeth, and the lips. Before we examine these, it will...
Page 310 - We now come lastly to the absolute loss of the vowel, cither when it stands actually last, or when it is followed only by a weakly-sounded consonant, that is, practically, by none at all — the result, like the loss of quantity already considered, of the tendency in Latin to throw back the accent as far as possible from the end of the word, subject to the rule of the length of the penultima. First under this head comes the loss of original o, or later u, in the nominatives, such as ager(os...
Page 13 - I feel strongly inclined to ascribe the phonetic diversity which we observe between Sanskrit, Greek, and Latin, to a previous state of language, in which, as in the Polynesian dialects, the two or three principal points of consonantal contact were not yet felt as definitely separated from each other.

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