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(Being THE FIFTH OF A NEW SERIES.)

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LONDON: Printed by NICHOLS, SON, and BENTLEY,

at Cicero's Head, Red Lion Passage, Fleet Street ;
where LETTERS are particularly requested to be sent, Post-Paid.

And sold by J. HARRIS (Successor to Mrs. NEWBERY),
at the Corner of St. Paul's Church Yard, Ludgate Street. 1812.

Tae following Table, constructed upon a philosophical consideration of the attraction of the Sun and Moon' in thoir several positions respecting the Earth, and confirmed by the experience of many years actual observation, will, without trouble, suggest to the observer what kind of Weather will most probably follow the Moon's entrance into any one of her Quarters; and that so near the truth, that in very few instances it will be found to fail.

NEW OR FULL MOON.

SUMMER.

WINTER.

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Very rainy

If it be a New or Full Moon, or the Moon

enters into the First or Last Quarter,
at the hour of 12 at Noon
Or between the hours of
and 4

6
6

8

Snow, or Rain

V.82

8

10 Midnight

2

10 Midnight

Changeable
Fair
Fair, if the Wind is N. W.; Rainy, if S.

or S. W.
Ditto
Faip
Fair
Cold with frequent Showers
Rain
Wind and Rain
Changeable
Frequent Showers

Fair and Mild
Fair
Fair and Frosty, if N, or N. E.; Rain, or

Snow, if S. or S. W.
Ditto
Fair and Frosty
Hard Frost, unless Wind S. or W.
Snow and Stormy
Ditto
Stormy
Cold Rain, if W.; Snow, if E.
Cold, with high Wind

6 8 10

8 10 12 at Noon.

OF GEOR

Henee the nearer the time of the Moon's Entrance at Full, and Change, and Quarters is to Midnight (that is, within two hours before or atjer Midnight), the more fair the weather is in the Summer; but the nearer to Noon, the less fair. Also, the Moon's Entrance at Full, fhange and Quarters, during six of the Afternoon hours, viz. from 4 to 10, may be followed by fair weather, but this is mostly dependent on the wind. The same entrance during all the hours after Midnight, except the two first, is unfavourable to fair weather, The like, nearly, may be observed in the Winter

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Dec. 31, 1812. IN

our periodical Addresses to our Friends and Correspondents, it has happened, for a long Series of Years, that our Political Hemisphere has been sadly darkened by storms and tempests, and that but few rays of hope or expectation have at intervals irradiated the horizon. А Star has at length appeared from the North, which bids fair to mark the limit of the most sanguinary ambition, to check the career of as implacable a Tyrant as ever excited the indignation of a suffering world.

Spes virtusque cadunt, trepidaque à mente recedit
Vertere terga pudor, nec leti cura decori,

Sed fagere infixum est, terræque optantur hiatus.” View the Individual at this moment, who at the distance of a few short months, led an Army amounting to almost half a Million of well-accoutred Warriors, accustomed to conquest, with the aspiring confidence of fixing for ever the Throne of his Sovereignty over the oppressed, abashed, desponding Nations of Europe -

“ Shorn of his beams, how is the mighty man fallen!" Surely now, the elasticity of the human heart will be restored to its due confidence in the gracious dispensations of Providence; Surely now, the eyes of Europe will be opened to the proper sense of the relative interests of each and all its Nations; Surely, high and mighty Potentates who exhibit a long and noble list of Imperial Ancestry, will no longer crouch, and bow the servile knee, to an Upstart and a Despot. The sinews of his arm are paralyzed, his sword is dishonoured, his confidence lost. But why do we so long,

:... and with an earnestness which we are at no pains to soften

MIVERSITY OF CEORGIA

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