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** As it is the wish of the Editors to render this Work a REPOSITORY O

whatever may be supposed to be most interesting to general readers, they bels

leave to offer one or two remarks, on what is new in the plan they have adopt

ed, and on the specimen of it now subinitted to the Public.

UNDER the title of Antiquarian Repertory, they have reason to hope, froi

the access that has been most liberally allowed them to unpublished manu

scripts, both in the national and in family repositories, that they shall for di

long period be able, not only to lay before their readers articles calculated to

gratify curiosity, but also to rescue from oblivion such materials as may throw

some light on the disputed points in British history, and on such minute fea-

tures in the state of society in former ages, as must necessarily be excluded

from the pages of the historian.

THE Editors have ventured to allot a part of their MAGAZINE to notices of

the articles contained in the most celebrated periodical publications ;-under

which they propose also to include works published in parts, at more irregular

intervals, and a list of the contents of the minor Journals. They are aware of

the difficulty of giving general satisfaction under this head; but as they have

never seen any attempt of the kind made, or at least persevered in, either by

their predecessors or contemporaries, they cannot but hope, that this proof of

their resolution to spare no pains for the gratification of their readers, will be

received with indulgence. And here they must regret, that it has not been in

their power to notice, in the present number, the British Review, No XVII,

which contains the best discussion they have any where seen, of the means by

which an equalization of weights and measures may be effected.

If the Editors shall be able to realize their own wishes and expectations, the

Register will comprise a greater variety of information than is to be found at

present in any monthly publication. Rash as it may appear, they will venture

to declare, that it is their ambition to give such a view of Foreign and Do-

mestic Affairs, as may in a great measure supersede the necessity of resorting

to Annual Registers, or other more voluminous and expensive works, for the

period which their labours may embrace. But as their limits had been almost

reached before they began to print this their last branch, the Editors must re-

quest their Readers to take the present as but an imperfect specimen of what

they mean it to contain. Every division of it has been curtailed ; and the

Public Papers and Accounts, as well as the list of Patents, Promotions, &c,

have been unavoidably postponed. All these, however, shall be given, from

the commencement of the year, in the early Numbers of the Magazine.

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ORIGINAL COMMUNICATIONS.

ORIGINAL POETRY.

On the Nature of the Office of Mareschal 123 A Last Adieu

169

Account of_Mr Ruthven's improved The Pastama

ib.

*Printing Press

mamman 125 The Mossy Seat

ib.

Account of the Method of Engraving on Stanzas

170

Stonemam

128 A Night Scene

ib.

Anecdote of the Highlanders in 1745 ; Lines written in Spring

ib.

by Mary Lady Clerk

w129 The Mermaid (From the German of

Inscription in the Church of St Hilary. 130 Goethe Journama

mim. 171

On the Origin of Hospitals for the Sick ib. Greece (From the French of Ardans ). ib.

On “ Šitting below the Sält” .132

REVIEW OF NEW PUBLICATIONS.

On the Fall of Volcanic Dust in the

Island of Barbadoes como

.134

Duchess of Angouleme's Journal.comm.172

Anecdotes of Antiquariesam

136

Ricardo on the Principles of Political

Chemical Process of Combustion mmmmm 138

Economy and Taxation mammamanam. 175

On the Original of Milton's Satan man

m140

Bingley's Useful Knowledge mamman 178

White's New Invented Horizon.amman 142 ANALYTICAL NOTICES.

Tales and Anecdotes of the Pastoral Life,

Encyclopædia Britannica-Supplement,

No FÍ...

143 Vol. II. Part I.

180

Remarks on Greek Tragedy, No II. Edinburgh Encyclopædia, Vol. XĮ.

Æschyli Chæphòri-Sophocles Elec Part I.

186

tra Juanian

147 LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC

Shakspeare Club of Alloa mummoniamm.152 INTELLIGENCE mananampananm. 189

Notices concerning the Scottish Gypsies WORKS PREPARING for PUBLICATION 194

(continued)

154 MontaLY LIST OF NEW PUBLICĄ.

SELECT EXTRACTS.

TIONS

.196

MONTHLY REGISTER.

Memorie of the Somervilles omaanmaan 162

FOREIGN INTELLIGENCEmmmmmmm199

ANTIQUARIAN REPERTORY.

PROCEEDINGS OF PARLIAMENT m. 206

Letter from James IV. to the King of BRITISH CHRONICLE umuman 211

Denmark, in Favour of Anthony British Legislation mmmmmmm218

Gawino, Earl of Little Egypt, &c. Promotions and Appointments.umam. 219

1506

www.mm.167

Commercial Report

.221

Act of the Lords of Council, respecting Agricultural Reportmammas

224

John Faw, &c. 1541

ib. Meteorological Report.com

-226

Confessions of Witchcraft, 1623.com ib. | Births, Marriages, and Deaths.com 227

WILLIAM BLACKWOOD, NO 17, PRINCE'S STREET, EDINBURGH ;
AND T. CADELL AND W. DAVIES, STRAND, LONDON ;

To whom Communications (post paid) may be addressed.
SOLD ALSO BY ALL THE BOOKSELLERS OF THE UNITED KINGDOM.

NOTICES TO CORRESPONDENTS.

The curious “ Antiquarian Notices,” by the learned author of the article
“On the Nature of the Office of Mareschal,”—and the letter relating to the
compilation of a Gaelic Dictionary, will appear in our next.

The articles—“On the Utility of studying the Ancient and Foreign Lan-
guages”—“On the Origin of Whig and Tory”—“On the Detrition of Moun-
tains, &c.”—and the Review of a recent elegant Poem, transmitted by A. D.
are under consideration.

The Review of Dr Irving's Life of Buchanan has been unavoidably post-
poned.

The continuation of the “ Memorandums of a View-Hunter,”—and the
Letter relating to the proposed New Translation of the Psalms, were too late
for insertion.

The obliging 'Hints' from N-'s, and the Additional Communications from

Strila,' and from “ An unknown Friend,” have been duly received :-Also,
several Gypsey Notices, which will be carefully attended to in our next.

The paper on 'Craniology,' by ` Peter Candid,' would have appeared in our
present Number if it had not contained some improper personal allusions.

The “ Memoirs of the House of Graham,” in the shape in which they have
been sent us, have nothing moic to recommend them than the good intentions
of the author.

The paper under the title of “ Irish Literature,” which announces the
intended early publication of an “ Irish-English Dictionary," in one volume
quarto, by Edward O'Reilly,” was omitted to be noticed in another place.
From the same quarter we have received some extracts from a new work, of
which the object seems to be to prove an affinity between the Hebrew and
Irish languages; but we know not well what to make of them, and our corres-
pondent has not condescended to assist us.

Contents.

ORIGINAL COMMUNICATIONS.

ORIGINAL POETRY.

Account of the Wernerian Natural His. Sonnet to the Yew-tree (By the late Dr
tory Society of Edinburgh.com.mmmm... 231 Leyden),

277

Communication from Colonel Mudge..... 234 The Wreath.

ib.

Account of Bowed Davie, the supposed Song

ib.

Original of the Black Dwarf. 235 The Burial of Sir John Moore.common ib.

Epistle of a Highland Chief

-236 The Moss Rose (From the German of

Oath of Bread and Salta

ib. Krummacher)

278

Remarks on the Humour of Ancient The Two Graves (From the German of

Scottish Songs

.237 Klopstock)

ib.

Experiment, by Mr Lauder Dick, re-

lative to the Preservation of the Ve-

REVIEW OF NEW PUBLICATIONS.

getative Power in the Seeds of Plants 239 | Lalla Rookh ; an Oriental Romance.
Narrow Escape from drowning of the By Thomas Moore..

279

Blind and Deaf Boy, James Mitchell 240

Memoirs of the Life and Writings of

Extracts from a Communication to J. George Buchanan. By Dr Irving.com 286

C. Curwen, Esq. M. P. on the Relief The Craniad, or Spurzheim Illustrated ;

of the Poor.

241

a Poem

m288

Origin of the Terms, Whig and Tory...246 Manfred ; a Dramatic Poem. By Lord

Tales and Anecdotes of the Pastoral Life, Byron

No III.

247

ANALYTICAL NOTICES.

Anecdotes of the Inquisition.am -250

296

Sketches of Foreign Scenery and Man.

Quarterly Review, No 32mm

nersama

300

-251 Edinburgh Review, No 55.caraman

Letter froin the late Dr M.Lagan, rela-

LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC

tive to the Compilation of a Gaelic INTELLIGENCEmmmmmm

m303

Dictionary

-256 WORKSPREPARING for PUBLICATION 308

Letter of Dr Vincent respecting Dr MONTHLY LIST OF NEW PUBLICA-

Adam

m260

TIONS nuo

310

Observations on Mr Wordsworth's Let-

ter relative to a new edition of Burns'

MONTHLY REGISTER.

Works

261 FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE cccommm...315

Introduction to a Medical Report of

PROCEEDINGS OF PARLIAMENT 319

Edinburgh

266

British CIIRONICLE mar

Sketch of a Tradition related by a Monk Promotions and Appointments com

330

in Switzerland

270 | Commercial Report

333

Account of Sir George Mackenzie's MS. Agricultural Reportmamman

336

History of Scotland (By the Rev. Dr Meteorological Report....

ma 338

M'Crie)

-273 Births, Marriages, and Deaths...um.339

323

NOTICES TO CORRESPONDENTS.

The following Articles, which we have been under the necessity of postponing,
shall, if possible, appear in our next:

-Car-Rock Stone Beacon'— On the
Study of some branches of Natural History' — Attack upon Bergen-op-Zoom'

- Danger of Early Attachments, a Tale;'-Continuations of the View-Hunter
-Greek Tragedy_and Scottish Gypsies ;-Reviews of • Grenfell's Speech
of the · Life of William Hutton'--of Miss Edgeworth's Comic Dramas'—and
of Colman's . Eccentricities for Edinburgh.'

The communications upon · The Origin and Descent of the Gaeľ— Etýmo-
logy of the Alpliabéť– Isle of ManDangers of Good Fortune - Origin
of the Gypsies' Story of Colonel M‘Gregor'— Valley of the Voice of Fear,'
—and a number of poetical pieces, are under consideration.

Besides the paper by 'Candidus,' noticed in our last, we have received various
communications upon Dr Spurzheim's system-or rather upon the controversies
to which it has given rise. Two of these now before us are ably written, but
nevertheless inadmissible. They are opposite in their views of the subject, but
equally objectionable on account of frequent and invidious personal reflections.
We have no objection to insert another paper on Craniology; but only on con-
dition that the subject be treated exclusively upon its own merits—as a philo-
sophical discussion, and not as a party quarrel.

We have just received a valuable communication, entitled, “On sitting bea
low the Salt, and the Stewarts of Allanton. This able vindication of that an-
cient family was too late for our present Number, but it shall occupy a promi-
nent place in our next.
From the

press of materials requiring immediate attention, and the length of
our Review branch; we have been obliged to leave over, till next month, the
very excellent paper (already in types), entitled, “Cursory Remarks on Music,
and likewise our Select Extracts and Antiquarian Repertory.

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