The Administration of India from 1859-1868: The First Ten Years of Administration Under the Crown, Volume 2

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Macmillan, 1869 - Great Britain - 360 pages
 

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Page 187 - We know and respect the feelings of attachment with which the natives of India regard the lands inherited by them from their ancestors, and we desire to protect them in all rights connected therewith, subject to the equitable demands of the state; and we will that generally, in framing and administering the law, due regard be paid to the ancient rights, usages, and customs of India.
Page 86 - The importance of female education in India cannot be over-rated ; and we have observed with pleasure the evidence which is now afforded of an increased desire on the part of many of the natives of India to give a good education to their daughters. By this means a far greater proportional impulse is imparted to the educational and moral tone of the people than by the education of men.
Page 108 - ... of his victorious enemies by accusing him. An Indian government has only to let it be understood that it wishes a particular man to be ruined ; and, in twenty-four hours, it will be furnished with grave charges, supported by depositions so full and circumstantial that any person unaccustomed to Asiatic mendacity would regard them s decisive.
Page 169 - The advance of money by way of loan to a person engaged or about to engage in any business on a contract with that person that the lender shall receive a rate of interest varying with the profits...
Page 87 - ... useful and practical knowledge suited to every station in life may be best conveyed to the great mass of the people who are utterly incapable of obtaining any education worthy of the name by their own unaided efforts...
Page 86 - ... to pass every student of ordinary ability who has fairly " profited by the curriculum of school and college study which he " has passed through, the standard required being such as to " command respect without discouraging the efforts of deserving
Page 80 - We look forward to the time when any general system of education entirely provided by Government may be discontinued, with the gradual advance of the system of grants in aid, and when many of the existing Government institutions, especially those of the higher order, may be safely closed, or ^ transferred to the management of local bodies under the control of, and aided by, the State.
Page 86 - What we desire is, that, where the other qualifications of the candidates for appointments under Government are equal, a person who has received a good education, irrespective of the place or manner in which it may have been acquired, should be preferred to one who has not ; and that, even in lower situations, a man who can read and write be preferred to one who cannot, if he is equally eligible in other respects.
Page 162 - The rule laid down in section 4 that no person shall by marriage acquire any interest in the property of the person whom he or she marries nor become'incapable of doing any act in respect of his or her own property which he or she could have done if unmarried, was challenged in Council by such eminent and 1 Grant Duff, Memoir of Sir H.
Page 88 - Schools — whose object should be, not to train highly a few youths, but to provide more opportunities than now exist for the acquisition of such an improved education as will make those who possess it more useful members of society in every condition of life — should exist in every district in India.

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