The London Magazine, and Monthly Chronologer, Volume 1

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C. Ackers, 1732 - English essays
 

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Page 148 - GENTLEMAN'S Monthly Intelligencer. JUNE, 1732. THURSDAY, June i. HIS Day his Majefty went to the Houl'e of Peers, and gave the royal Afl'ent to the following Bills, viz.
Page 36 - I'll bring to my arms. The GENTLEMAN'S Monthly Intelligencer. APRIL, 1732. MONDAY, April 3. 1 1 S Majefty went to the Houfe of Peers, and gave the royal Affent to the following Bills, viz.
Page 161 - Dublin : translated from the Latin, with Notes, and a Dissertation concerning the Principle and Criterion of Virtue, and the Origin of the Passions.
Page 111 - Becaufe it has been found by Experience, during the Time the Duties upon Salt were taken off, that great Improvements have been made in feveral Parts of the Kingdom, by ufing Salt in manuring of Land, but by the Revival of thofe Duties, without the Provifion defigned by...
Page 110 - Moved, that it be an Inftruftion to the faid Committee, that they do receive a Claufe to "exempt all Salt ufed for manuring of Land from the Duties laid by the faid Bill.
Page 229 - Charlestown (a great mart) is within 120 miles. If the Colony is attacked, it may be relieved by sea, from Port Royal, or the Bahamas ; and the Militia of South Carolina is ready to support it, by land.
Page 39 - Think not, indignant reader His life useless to mankind: PROVIDENCE Favoured, or rather connived at, His execrable designs, That he might remain To this and future ages, A conspicuous proof and example Of how small estimation Exorbitant wealth is held in the sight Of the ALMIGHTY, By his...
Page 103 - Edition, to which is now added an Account of the Author's Journey to the Banks of Euphrates at Beer, and to the Country of Mesopotamia.
Page 306 - Those marriages generally abound most with love and constancy, that are preceded by a long courtship. The passion should strike root, and gather strength before marriage be grafted on it. A long course of hopes and expectations fixes the idea in our minds, and habituates us to a fondness of the person beloved.
Page 216 - ... it in his head to carry the ship a great way about, through sands, rocks, and shallows ; who, after having- lost a great number of seamen, destroyed a great deal of tackle and rigging, and subjected the owners to an enormous expense, at last by chance hits the port, and triumphs in his good conduct.

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