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W. E. Goldsborough, C. A. Adams, Jr., C. P. Matthews, Geo. F. Sever, Chas. E. Skinner, and R. W. Pope. General remarks on methods and ideals of electrical engineering education.

THE TEACHING OF PHYSICS TO ENGINEERING STUDENTS W. S. Franklin

Vol. xxii – 1903, pp. 561-566 Discussion of certain common faults in teaching methods, followed by a general outline of the author's method.

Discussion, p. 567, by Messrs. W. E. Goldsborough and A. S. Langsdorf.

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THE PROBLEMS THAT ARE FACING THE ELECTRICAL ENGINEER OF TO-DAY
AND THE QUALITIES OF MIND AND CHARACTER WHICH ARE

NEEDED TO MEET THEM
J. G. White

Vol. xxii-1903, pp. 569-578 Outline of the scope and character of training required by engineers. Qualifications for successful engineer.

Discussion, incorporated with that of paper by L. A. Osborne on “Proper Qualifications of Electrical Engineering School Graduates, from the Manufacturer's Standpoint.”

THE PROPER QUALIFICATIONS OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING SCHOOL GRADUATES

FROM THE TELEPHONE ENGINEERS STANDPOINT Bancroft Gherardi, Jr.

Vol. xxii-1903, pp. 579-586 Outline of the functions of a technical education and criticisms of technical graduates.

Discussion, incorporated with that of paper by L. A. Osborne on "Proper Qualifications of Electrical Engineering School Graduates, from the Manufacturer's Standpoint."

PROPER QUALIFICATIONS OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING SCHOOL GRADUATES,

FROM THE MANUFACTURER'S STANDPOINT L. A. Osborne

Vol. xxii-1903, pp. 587-591 Suggestions for improvement of technical education of engineers for manufacturing work.

Discussion (including that of paper by J. G. White on "The Problems that are Facing the Electrical Engineer of To-day and the Qualities of Mind and Character which are Needed to Meet them”; and paper by Bancroft Gherardi, Jr., on “The Proper Qualifications of Electrical Engineering School Graduates from the Telephone Engineer's Standpoint"), pp. 592-598, by Messrs. W. E. Goldsborough, Prof. Jacoby, A. F. Ganz, F. C. Caldwell, Hugo Diemer, Prof. Allen, Prof. Waldo, J. G. White, H. S. Carhart and D. B. Rushmore.

Engineering education from a teacher's standpoint.

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THE TYPICAL COLLEGE COURSES DEALING WITH THE PROFESSIONAL AND

THEORETICAL PHASES OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING Dugald C. Jackson

Vol. xxii-1903, pp. 599-607 Characterization of students entering college and outline of studies requisite for their training as electrical engineers. Classification of typical electrical engineering courses.

No discussion.

ENGINEERING ENGLISH T. J. Johnston

Vol. xxii-1903, pp. 609-614 Examples of poor engineering English and a plea for adequate instruction in English.

No discussion.

TRAINING AN ARTIST IN THE FORCES OF NATURE E. H. Mullin

Vol. xxii --1903, pp. 615-622 Faults in modern educational methods. Discussion of education as an art and as a science.

No discussion.

THE ATTITUDE OF THE TECHNICAL SCHOOL TOWARD THE PROFESSION

OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING Henry H. Norris

Vol. xxvi-1907, pp. 1429-1439 Outline of the purpose of technical education, followed by brief résumé of the history of technical schools in the United States, with special reference to Sibley College and its early development. Short description of present curriculum at Sibley College and method of rating students searching employment. Table of present occupation of Sibley graduates.

Discussion, incorporated with paper by V. Karapetoff on "On the Concentric Method of Teaching Electrical Engineering."

ON THE CONCENTRIC METHOD OF TEACHING ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING V. Karapetoff

Vol. xxvi-1907, pp. 1441-1456 Description of a new method of education that begins by establishing a general view of the scope and character of the career, and then works gradually outward, taking up the auxiliary studies as the student learns to appreciate their use and importance. The general exposition of the method is followed by a suggested schedule of subjects for a complete electrical engineering course.

Discussion (including that of paper by Henry H. Norris on "The Attitude of the Technical School Toward the Profession of Electrical Engineering"), pp. 1457-1468, by Messrs. V. Karapetoff, F. D. Crocker, Gano Dunn, William Esty, G. W. Patterson, Lester W. Gill, L. D. Nordstrum, Charles F. Scott and J. J. Carty.

Criticisms of the concentric method of education. General remarks on methods used in various important engineering schools. Motion carried to appoint Educational Committee.

THE BEST ENGINEERING EDUCATION Charles F. Scott

Vol. xxvii-1908, pp. 67-78 General scope and purpose of engineering education; followed by a digest of all the educational papers presented before the Institute since 1892.

Discussion, incorporated with Chas. P. Steinmetz's paper on "Electrical Engineering Education."

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING EDUCATION Chas, P. Steinmetz

Vol. xxvii-1908, pp. 79-85 Criticism of the American system of education, with special reference to the compensation of teachers, etc.

Discussion (included with the paper by Chas. F. Scott on "The Best Engineering Education"), pp. 86-135, by Messrs. Chas. F. Scott, Chas. P. Steinmetz, L. A. Osborne, H. E. Clifford, F. B. Crocker, H. W. Buck, W. S. Franklin, L. B. Stillwell, Albert F. Ganz, J. G. White, W. E. S. Temple, Louis A. Ferguson, Samuel Sheldon, P. H. Thomas, W. L. Robb, C. 0. Mailloux, A. E. Kennelly, H. P. Coho, A. S. McAllister, O. J. Ferguson, H. W. Blake, and Dugald C. Jackson.

Comprehensive discussion on the scope and character of engineering education, pointing out defects and suggesting reforms.

THE NEW METHOD OF TRAINING ENGINEERS Magnus W. Alexander

Vol. xxvii – 1908, pp. 1459-1471 Experience with the General Electric apprenticeship course at Lynn. Plan outlined for co-operative engineering course between colleges and factories.

Discussion, incorporated with paper by B. A. Behrend on "The Relation of the Manufacturing Company to the Technical Graduate."

RELATION OF THE MANUFACTURING COMPANY TO THE TECHNICAL GRADUATE

Vol. xxvii-1908, pp. 1473-1476

David B. Rushmore

No discussion.

THE RELATION OF THE MANUFACTURING COMPANY TO THE TECHNICAL GRADUATE B. A. Behrend

Vol. xxvii-1908, pp. 1477-1479 Discussion (including that of paper by Magnus W. Alexander on "The New Method of Training Engineers," and paper by David B. Rushmore on “Relation of the Manufacturing Company to the Technical Graduate”), pp. 1480-1497, by Messrs. B. A. Behrend, J. P. Jackson, Elihu Thomson, Percy H. Thomas, Morgan Brooks, Henry H. Norris, Charles P. Steinmetz, Dugald C. Jackson, C. A. Adams, A. F. Ganz, Charles F. Scott, Gano Dunn and M. W. Alexander.

General discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of co-operative system of education from different points of view.

FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES OF INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION Herman Schneider

Vol. xxviii-1909, PP. 269-278 Description of a system of education involving co-operation between the industrial com panies and public schools, the pupils dividing their time between the factory and the school. Results from systems in use.

Discussion, pp. 279-311, by Messrs. Harry Barker, Arthur D. Dean, C. E. Downton, Charles P. Steinmetz, W. S. Franklin, John Price Jackson, Otis Allen Kenyon, Dugald C. Jackson, A. R. Dennington, Herman Schneider, Charles S. Howe, V. Karapetoff, G. M. Basford, Jackson C. Humphries, Ralph W. Pope, Sidney W. Ashe, Franklin Phillips and Willard S. Atkinson.

Discussion of general and industrial education, with special reference to the co-operative system, night schools, apprenticeship courses and lecture courses for employees.

THE TRAINING OF NON-TECHNICAL MEN

C. R. Dooley

Vol. xxviii-1909, pp. 1095-1101 Description of the apprenticeship and night school systems used in training non-technical men employed by the Westinghouse Companies at East Pittsburg.

Discussion, incorporated with that of Dr. Charles P. Steinmetz's paper on “The Value of Classics in Engineering Education.”

THE VALUE OF CLASSICS IN ENGINEERING EDUCATION Charles P. Steinmetz

Vol. xxviii-1909, pp. 1103-1106 Criticism of modern engineering education.

Discussion, pp. 1107-1131, including discussion of paper by Mr. C. R. Dooley on "The Training of Non-Technical Men,” by Messrs. Charles P. Steinmetz, Frederick P. Fish, Comfort A. Adams, Farley Osgood, M. G. Lloyd, John C. Parker, David B. Rushmore, Clayton H. Sharp, James G. White, C. R. Dooley, George F. Sever, George H. Gibson, A. E. Kennelly, H. W. Fisher, J. Dalemont and Ralph D. Mershon.

General discussion of the character and scope of training required by electrical engineers.

EDUCATION FOR LEADERSHIP IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING Samuel Sheldon

Vol. xxix-1910, pp. 649-662 Statistical study of the importance of electrical engineering and the electrical engineer, followed by general suggestions for the modification of existing college practices, with reference to increasing the chances of engineering graduates becoming leaders.

Discussion, pp. 663-674, by Messrs. Charles S. Howe, Abraham Flexner, J. W. Lieb, Jr., A. E. Kennelly, William McClellan, L. B. Stillwell, William J. Berry, A. S. Langsdorf and Samuel Sheldon.

General remarks on electrical engineering education.

2. GENERAL THEORY

THEORETICAL INVESTIGATION OF SOME OSCILLATIONS OF EXTREMLY HIGH

POTENTIAL IN ALTERNATING HIGH-POTENTIAL TRANSMISSIONS Charles Proteus Steinmetz

Vol. xviii-1901, pp. 383-405 Mathematical investigation of the effect of the exponential term in the general equation for alternating-current circuits, followed by numerical examples showing the nature of disturbances due to opening a shortcircuit on the line and to connecting the line to a source of alternatingcurrent energy.

Discussion, incorporated with that of paper by E. W. Rice, Jr., on "The Control of High-Voltage Systems of Large Power."

A DISCUSSION OF SOME POINTS IN ALTERNATING-CURRENT THEORY W. S. Franklin

Vol. xxi-1903, pp. 589-501 Discussion of ideas and conceptions with reference to presentation of theory of alternating current. Criticisms of Dr. Steinmetz's methods Polar diagram vs. crank diagram, necessity of choosing signs in circuit problems, topographical vs. vector methods, physical basis of transformer and induction motor equations, vector representation of power.

No discussion.

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THE EFFECT OF IRON IN DISTORTING ALTERNATING CURRENT WAVE FORM Frederick Bedell and Elbert B. Tuttle

Vol. XXV–1906, pp. 671-691 Theoretical investigation of the relation between the third harmonic introduced by iron into the exciting current and the hysteresis loop. Also, an exposition of the relation between the area of the hysteresis loop and the angle of hysteresis advance.

Discussion, pp. 692-714, by Messrs. Chas. P. Steinmetz, Philip Torchio, W. S. Franklin, Frederick Bedell, Harold Pender, A. Henry Pikler, S. P. Grace, H. B. Tuttle, S. N. Kintner and A. W. Copley.

Full discusison of wave distortion due to iron, showing that other harmonics than the third modify Professor Bedell's conclusions. References to early work of Huguet, Froelich, Kennelly, Gerosa, Finzi, Eickemeyer and Steinmetz. Effect of wave distortion with different polyphase transformer connections. Derivation of the parabolic law of magnetic induction. Oscillograms of induced e. m. f. showing effect of primary impedance on wave form in core loss tests and in transformers.

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THE PROPERTIES OF ELECTRONS

PRESIDENTS ADDRESS Samuel Sheldon

Vol. xxvi-1907, pp. 937-968 Conception of electrons and brief exposition of their properties. Application of electronic theory to the explanation of the fundamental principles of electrophysics-conduction of electricity in gases, vapors and

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