Manual of Geology: Theoretical and Practical, Volume 2

Front Cover
C. Griffin, 1885 - Geology

From inside the book

Contents

Cambrian and Silurian Brachiopoda Comparison through Four Genera
9
Cambrian and Silurian Pelecypoda Comparison through
10
Genera
11
Llandovery Species Geographical Analysis
12
Lower Llandovery Rocks Fauna
13
Faunal Relationship between the Caradoc and Llandovery Groups
14
Ludlow Actinozoa Geographical Distribution of in Eight
15
PRECAMBRIAN PERIOD
16
Localities
26
PALEONTOLOGY OF THE LOWEST CAMBRIAN ROCKS
35
Menevian trilobites
41
Dolgelly group
54
Sequence of the Arenig rocks
61
888
66
LOWER BALA AND LLANDEILO FLAGS
69
CARADOC SANDSTONE BALA BEDS AND CONISTON
76
Coniston limestone position
81
02080
86
LOWER LLANDOVERY
89
THE WENLOCK LIMESTONE
113
142149
150
and PalŠontological Particulars
158
Devonian and Old Red Sandstone
190
PalŠozoic Series of the Boulonnais with British Equivalents 22 European and American Equivalents of the Three Stages of British Devonian Rocks
196
TABLE PAGE 26 Carboniferous Rocks Subdivisions of
213
Bernician and Tuedian Series Correlation of
249
Irish CoalMeasures General Section
255
28a Areas of CoalFields of the United Kingdom
257
Geographical Distribution of Carboniferous Rocks in Great Britain and Ireland 258259
258
Carboniferous Actinozoa in Great Britain Ireland Belgium and America
278
Carboniferous Brachiopoda in the same
283
162
284
Carboniferous Pelecypoda Dimyaria in the same
286
Carboniferous Gasteropoda in the same
288
Carboniferous Cephalopoda in the same
289
Summary of Upper PalŠozoic Carboniferous Life
293
GENERAL TABLES of the ORGANIC REMAINS of the UPPER PALEOZOIC CARBONIFEROUS STRATA 294305
295
Permian Rocks Types of
311
Sequence of Conditions in Upper PalŠozoic Strata
313
Stratigraphical Sequence and Geographical Distribution of British Permian Strata
319
Summary of Permian Life
320
Keuper and Bunter Beds General Succession of for Britain
326
Triassic and Permian Strata General Classification of
329
SupraCoralline beds
341
Triassic Deposits of Germany
344
Summary of Triassic Life
345
British Jurassic Series Subdivisions of
349
German Jurassic Series Classification of
350
General review
429
Groups of Middle Jurassic rocks
441
Geographical Distribution of the Jurassic Horizons through Four
445
Section of PassageBeds at Carr Naze
451
Section of the Lamb Inn Quarry
458
Series N E of Oxford
459
Coralline Beds of Scarborough Sequence
467
THE KIMMERIDGE CLAY AND PORTLAND OOLITE
471
Jurassic Rocks Distribution over Four of the chief Areas
472
St Albans Head
479
GENERAL TABLES of the ORGANIC REMAINS of the JURASSIC STRATA 489502
489
History
505
UPPER MESOZOIC STRATA
512
Lower or Hastings Series
517
cluding the PUNFIELD SERIES
527
Atherfield clay
533
Physical characters
543
UPPER GREENSAND AND CHALK
552
Chalk of the south of England
559
The ten zones of the English Chalk
565
Cretaceous rocks of France and
572
Summary of Cretaceous life
579
Strata
583
PAGE
598
British Tertiary Rocks Historical Classification showing
602
OLIGOCENE STRATA
621
Oligocene Fauna through the Headon Osborne Bembridge
624
Summary of Eocene Life
645
History and range
646
The Crag
650
Italy and Sicily
655
Upper or Norwich Crag Fossils Distribution through Sixteen
657
Subdivisions
666
Summary of Pliocene Life
667
POSTTERTIARY POSTPLIOCENE OR QUATERNARY
672
GENERAL TABLES of the ORGANIC REMAINS of the PLIOCENE
673
Preglacial land surfaces
674
Scottish Glacial Deposits
679
Subsidence of the
683
Summary of Pleistocene Life
686
Glacial succession in Scotland
695
581
697
170173 190
698
Purbeck Strata at Lulworth Sequence
703
Scottish glacial deposits
704
GENERAL TABLES of the ORGANIC REMAINS of the MIDDLE PALEOZOIC STRATA 206211
706
British Cretaceous System Subdivisions of
709
GENERAL TABLES of the ORGANIC REMAINS of the PLEISTO
710

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 679 - ... which, if we multiply this depth by the length and breadth of the cavern, will be found to exceed 5000 cubic feet. The whole of this mass has been again and again dug over in search of teeth and bones, which it still contains abundantly, though in broken fragments. The state of these is very different from that of the bones we find in any of the other caverns, being of a black, or, more properly speaking, dark umber colour throughout, and many of them readily crumbling under the finger into a...
Page viii - Numerous TABLES of ORGANIC REMAINS have been prepared and brought down to 1884, embracing the accumulated wealth of the labours of past and present investigators during the last thirty years. Eleven of these Tables contain every known British genus, zoologically or systematically placed, with the number of species in each, showing their broad distribution through time. The remaining 105 Tables are devoted to the analysis, relation, historical value, and distribution of specific life through each...
Page 679 - It is literally true that in this single cavern (the size and proportions of which are nearly equal to those of the interior of a large church) there are hundreds of cart-loads of black animal dust entirely covering the whole floor, to a depth which must average at least six feet, and which, if we multiply this depth by the length and breadth of the cavern, will be found to exceed 5000 cubic feet.
Page 679 - ... in broken fragments. The state of these is very different from that of the bones we find in any of the other caverns, being of a black, or more properly speaking, dark umber colour throughout, and many of them readily crumbling under the finger into a soft dark powder, resembling mummy powder, and being of the same nature with the black earth in which they are embedded. The quantity of animal matter accumulated on this floor...
Page 276 - ... circulars, to which the replies appear to have been exceedingly disproportionate, although the viva voce evidence which they obtained was sufficient. In brief, their conclusions are as follows : — The workable depth of coal mines depends upon human endurance of high temperatures and the possibility of reducing the temperature of the air in contact with heated strata. The mechanical difficulties connected with increased depth, and the cost of steam power for hoisting the deeper coal, do not...
Page 679 - ... were finally dispossessed of their hold by an irruption of water which let fall the muddy sediment now enveloping the bones. The ordinary action of water passing through the calcareous rock then covered the whole with stalagmite, and closed up the bones from the destructive agency of moisture and air. This accounts for the conservation of their gelatine. Few conclusions of this precise nature appear better supported by the facts of the case, and when we reflect on the remarkable analogy in almost...
Page 267 - In some instances a single seam of coal in these strata is sixty feet thick ; and near the middle of the valley, between the Sharp and Broad mountains no less than 65 seams have been counted. The bituminous coal-field, embracing the western part of Pennsylvania, and a part of Ohio, extends over an area of twenty-four thousand square miles ; the largest accumulation of carbonaceous matter probably in the world.
Page 240 - Caermarthen, and part of Brecon, is from 18 to 20 miles ; it becomes much narrower in Pembrokeshire, being there only from 3 to 5 miles. This area extends from Pontypool on the east to St. Bride's Bay on the west, and forms a vast basin of limestone in which all the strata of coal and ironstone are deposited. The...
Page 26 - Hunt, animal life may have afforded part of the carbonaceous material, and, perhaps, as large a part as vegetable life. The presence of graphite in large deposits occurring both in beds and veins in the Laurentian rocks, clearly determines that its origin and deposition were contemporaneous with the mass or containing rock ; the graphite, again, is associated with calcite, quartz, and orthoclase.
Page 267 - ... 65 seams have been counted. The bituminous coal-field, embracing the western part of Pennsylvania, and a part of Ohio, extends over an area of twenty-four thousand square miles ; the largest accumulation of carbonaceous matter probably in the world. In fact, the bituminous coal measures can perhaps be traced almost continuously from Pennsylvania to the Mississippi, and even into Missouri, two hundred miles west of that river. Indeed, coal exists on the eastern slope of the Rocky Mountains ; and...

Bibliographic information