The Electrical Researches of ... Henry Cavendish, F. R. S.: Written Between 1771 and 1781, Ed. from the Original Manuscript ...

Front Cover
University Press, 1879 - Electricity - 454 pages
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

AN ATTEMPT TO EXPLAIN SOME OF THE PRINCIPAL PHENOMENA OF ELECTRICITY
1
3 COMPARISON OF THE CHARGES OF COATED PLATES
3
4 REPULSION AS SQUARE OF REDUNDANT FLUID
4
The repulsion between two bodies electrified to the same degree ought
11
From MS No
13
Pressure of electric fluid against a surface
21
Charge of a thin flat plate independent of its thickness
31
Plan of usual disposition of vials and bodies to be tried
42
Molecular constitution of
43
On the cases in which bodies receive electricity from or part with
51
Charge of a condenser little affected by the presence of an over
52
Capacity when the density is supposed uniform
61
Prop xxx1 Fig 3 Charge of cylinder compared with that of globe
69
Concave plate compared with flat
76
Cor 176
85
Cor 7
97
FIG PAGE
104
Comparison with the globe
108
The Leyden jars
110
Advantages of the method 246
115
Trial Plate
116
New apparatus for the comparison of capacities Fig 20 295
120
Dec 16 1771 Conductivity of stone squares
129
Consideration of the effects of external bodies on the globe and the plates
132
Hypothesis about the relative effect of surrounding bodies on the capa
142
List of plates of glass 592
144
The trial plate 297
147
Ten plates from Nairne 593
157
Slit coatings
159
Charge directly as surface and inversely as thickness
163
Experiment to determine whether the air between the plates is charged
164
Fig 9 Theory of conducting strata in the glass plate
169
342
170
Comparison with a very weak degree of electrification Large cylinder
176
Density more nearly uniform than if there had been
179
Effect of heat on glass To face p
180
Cor 2
181
Electric spark
182
Lemma Potential of two equal particles compared with that of their
187
386
189
Effect of floor and walls of the room
193
Condition of electric equilibrium between conductors in electric com
199
Electrification by induction
205
Effect of an overcharged body
209
1st Night
216
The electricity of glass is here taken to be positive
217
Two tin circles of 93 compared with one of 18 5
222
The charging jar
223
of the same thickness
224
Advantages of the second method
229
Diminution of shock by passing through different liquors 524
262
Six different arrangements
266
PAGE OF MS ARTICLES
269
Effect of the thickness of a plate on its capacity
272
Bearing on the theory
278
+ and electricity
280
Oblong plate
284
Comparison of Lanes electrometer with light straw electro
291
Charge of coated glass at different temperatures Fig
294
MEASURES
298
Advantage of the second method
299
These methods abandoned
305
Cor Distribution probably nearly the same as in plate of air of equiva
307
Conditions requisite for a spark and for attraction and repulsion
310
Recapitulation of the theory of coated plates
311
First leather Torpedo 599
312
Experiment of p 61 tried with small ball blown to the
316
Comparison of D + E + F when close together and when six inches apart
317
Experiments without any Torpedo 613
319
Comparison of charges of jars and battery method of repeated communi
321
on thick plates and 009 on thin plates
323
Comparison of water purged of air and plain water 624
326
Spreading not uniform throughout its extent
328
To find what power of the velocity the resistance is proportional to 629
336
Results 646
343
Coated plate compared with nonelectric body with strong and weak
344
Increase of charge by induction 652
347
Correction for spreading with electricity strong and weak 665
353
RESULTS ON RESISTANCE
359
NOTES BY THE EDITOR
362
Distribution of hypothetical fluids in spheres
368
Canals of incompressible fluid
375
Fifth hypothesis on the communication of electricity between conductor
384
Electromotive force required to produce a spark
386
Capacity of a long narrow cylinder
393
The battery and its charge
397
14
401
Theory of this method 582
403
The two flat conductors between which the plate of air lies or in modern
404
The testing electrometer 244
418
Torpedo in a basket in sand shock through wet shoes and through net 421424
421
Experiment of the globe and hemispheres
423
Structure of the electric organ
434
negative side
437
Pump water rain water salt in 1000 sea water 684
443
Sea salt
444
Other saline solutions
448
lent thickness
452
135139
453

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page lxvi - AN ATTEMPT TO EXPLAIN SOME OF THE PRINCIPAL PHENOMENA OF ELECTRICITY, BY MEANS OF AN ELASTIC FLUID*.
Page 376 - An Essay on the application of Mathematical Analysis to the Theories of Electricity and Magnetism...
Page 4 - ... which I call the electric fluid, the particles of which repel each other and attract the particles of all other matter with a force inversely as some less power of the distance than the cube ; the particles of all other matter also repel each other and attract those of the electric fluid, with a force varying according to the same power of the distances. Or, to express it more concisely, if you look upon the electric fluid as matter of a contrary kind to other matter...
Page xlv - He would undertake the most laborious researches in order to clear up a difficulty which no one but himself could appreciate, or was even aware of, and we cannot doubt that the result of his enquiries, when successful, gave him a certain degree of satisfaction. But it did not excite in him that desire to communicate the discovery to others which, in the case of ordinary men of science, generally ensures the publication of their results. How completely these researches of Cavendish remained unknown...
Page lx - Arts. 57-1, 575, 629, 686. intensity, are contained in the Report of the British Association for 1876. The laws of the strength of currents in multiple and divided circuits are accurately stated by Cavendish in Arts. 417, 597, 598. Cavendish applied the same method of experiment to compare the resistance of the same liquid at different temperatures*, and he found that "salt in 69 [of water] conducts 1'97 times better in heat of 105 than in that of 58." He also found that "the proportion of the...
Page 8 - WE. 80] COR. V. Let now the body H consist of a globe, whose diameter equals AB ; the globe being situated in such a manner, that the canal CG, if continued, would pass through its center; and let the electric attraction and repulsion be inversely as the square of the distance, the quantity of redundant fluid in the globe will be...
Page xxxv - The following extracts will indicate the chief points of electrical interest. " The vigour of the fresh taken Torpedos at the Isle of R6 was not "able to force the torpedinal fluid across the minutest tract of air; " not from one link of a small chain, suspended freely, to another ; not " through an almost invisible separation, made by the edge of a pen" knife in a slip of tinfoil pasted on sealing-wax.

Bibliographic information