The American Whig Review, Volume 8

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Wiley and Putnam, 1848
 

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Page 374 - But I suffer not a woman to teach, nor to usurp authority over the man, but to be in silence. For Adam was first formed then Eve. And Adam was not deceived ; but the woman, being deceived, was in the transgression ; notwithstanding she shall be saved in child-bearing, if they continue in faith, and charity, and holiness with sobriety.
Page 112 - The migration or importation of such persons as any of the states now existing shall think proper to admit, shall not be prohibited by the Congress prior to the year 1808, but a tax or duty may be imposed on such importation, not exceeding ten dollars for each person.
Page 376 - But I would have you know, that the head of every man is Christ; and the head of the woman is the man; and the head of Christ is God . 4 Every man praying or prophesying, having his head covered, dishonoureth his head.
Page 18 - There is no antidote against the opium of time, which temporally considereth all things: our fathers find their graves in our short memories, and sadly tell us how we may be buried in our survivors.
Page 123 - But this momentous question, like a fire bell in the night, awakened and filled me with terror. I considered it at once as the knell of the Union. It is hushed, indeed, for the moment. But this is a reprieve only, not a final sentence.
Page 374 - Let your women keep silence in the churches : for it is not permitted unto them to speak; but they are commanded to be under obedience, as also saith the law.
Page 18 - Darkness and light divide the course of time, and oblivion shares with memory a great part even of our living beings; we slightly remember our felicities, and the smartest strokes of affliction leave but short smart upon us. Sense endureth no extremities, and sorrows destroy us or themselves.
Page 18 - But the iniquity of oblivion blindly scattereth her poppy, and deals with the memory of men without distinction to merit of perpetuity...
Page 272 - My pulse as yours doth temperately keep time, And makes as healthful music. It is not madness That I have uttered : bring me to the test, And I the matter will re-word ; which madness Would gambol from.
Page 285 - Thanks to its tenderness, its joys and fears, To me the meanest flower that blows can give Thoughts that do often lie too deep for tears.

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