The National Third Reader: Containing Exercises in Articulation, Accent, Emphasis, Pronunciation, and Punctuation; Numerous and Progressive Exercises in Reading; and Notes

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Barnes & Burr, 1865 - Readers and speakers - 286 pages
 

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Page 185 - I REMEMBER, I REMEMBER. I REMEMBER, I remember The house where I was born, The little window where the sun Came peeping in at morn : He never came a wink too soon, Nor brought too long a day, But now I often wish the night Had borne my breath away ! I remember, I remember...
Page 185 - I remember, I remember Where I was used to swing, And thought the air must rush as fresh To swallows on the wing ; My spirit flew in feathers then That is so heavy now, And summer pools could hardly cool The fever on my brow. I remember, I remember The fir-trees dark and high ; I used to think their slender tops Were close against the sky : It was a childish ignorance, But now 'tis little joy To know I'm farther off from Heaven Than when I was a boy.
Page 31 - If I have seen any perish for want of clothing, or any poor without covering; If his loins have not blessed me, and if he were not warmed with the fleece of my sheep...
Page 262 - Tis life to feel the night-wind That lifts his tossing mane. A moment in the British camp — A moment — and away, Back to the pathless forest Before the peep of day. Grave men there are by broad Santee, Grave men with hoary hairs; Their hearts are all with Marion, For Marion are their prayers. And lovely ladies greet our band With kindliest welcoming, With smiles like those of summer, And tears like those of spring. For them we wear these trusty arms, And lay them down no more Till we have driven...
Page 126 - But a certain Samaritan as he journeyed came where he was, and when he saw him he had compassion on him and went to him and bound up his wounds, pouring in oil and wine, and set him on his own beast and brought him to an inn and took care of him.
Page 262 - We know the forest round us, As seamen know the sea; We know its walls of thorny vines. Its glades of reedy grass, Its safe and silent islands Within the dark morass. Woe to the English soldiery That little dread us near! On them shall light at midnight A strange and sudden fear; . When, waking to their tents on fire They grasp their arms in vain, And they who stand to face us Are beat to earth again...
Page 90 - That clustered round her head. She had a rustic, woodland air, And she was wildly clad: Her eyes were fair, and very fair ; — Her beauty made me glad. "Sisters and brothers, little Maid, How many may you be?" "How many? Seven in all," she said, And wondering looked at me.
Page 92 - And when the ground was white with snow, And I could run and slide, My brother John was forced to go, And he lies by her side". "How many are you, then, "said I, "If they two are in heaven?
Page 281 - Last May we made a crown of flowers: we had a merry day; Beneath the hawthorn on the green they made me Queen of May; And we danced about the may-pole and in the hazel copse, Till Charles's Wain came out above the tall white chimney-tops.
Page 266 - King of two hands, he does his part In every useful toil and art; A heritage, it seems to me, A king might wish to hold in fee.

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